What other hobbies attract coin collectors?
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I have a few but my other major one has been music. Namely synthesizers from new to vintage. In common with coins that both are major ebay markets. My quaint home studio in progress below.

Other than lame sports card(which i have too) what other hobbies mix with coins here on the board?

 

 

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Edited by mumu

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Lincolniana of all types, including exonumia, birth centennial material, prints, busts, vintage postcards, stamps, books. Also art glass (with the wife). Have the collector gene I'm afraid, doesn't take much to set me off on a hunt.

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That's easy - guns and trains. At least that is what I see in a lot of magazines.

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Interesting hobby/pastime mumu.  Somewhat of a common theme here- WWI & WWII military collectibles, and guns for me too.  Also enjoy walking fields looking for Indian artifacts.

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Antiques and horticulture.  I started with the latter last year, and am shopping for a commercial grade greenhouse.  My interest in organic food free of pesticide (coupled with my interest in science) finally piqued my interest in the subject matter.  So far I have young fruit trees and bushes, and once I have a nice greenhouse, I will start growing organic vegetables... again.

Edited by coinman_23885

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Metal detecting and Indian artifacts.

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spearpoint.jpg

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Edited by rrantique
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38 minutes ago, rrantique said:

Metal detecting and Indian artifacts.

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spearpoint.jpg

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Looks like you have a couple broken paleo base's in your frame- very rare finds.  Would be nice to stumble upon a "5 1/2 Cumberland type fluted to tip on both sides made out of Carter Cave flint in your area...would be worth more than a UNC 1907, High Relief Wire Rim DE!         

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23 hours ago, asdfgh said:

Guns, militaria, lanterns, old books

I had not heard lanterns as a hobby before. What is the general cutoff that makes a lantern collectible? Before a certain year 1XXX ?

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37 minutes ago, PocketArt said:

Looks like you have a couple broken paleo base's in your frame- very rare finds.  Would be nice to stumble upon a "5 1/2 Cumberland type fluted to tip on both sides made out of Carter Cave flint in your area...would be worth more than a UNC 1907, High Relief Wire Rim DE!         

I've never seen those words used together before. Hobby vernacular sure is something. Imagine saying that as a response to someone who didnt know the subject being discusses. The sentence becomes incoherent.

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Hobby Farm.   It has been fun raising crops and 20 head of Black Angus. (only 30 acres) Now the separated pastures rent out since I sold the cows. The rent keeps the pastures cut and generates 1.5 free acre of land purchase return each year.   --- 15 years to go and my property cost will be returned!!   lol

Edited by Six Mile Rick

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Interest artifact, Rich. I would like to add that to my history collection. 

I collecting several different history artifacts and Hot Wheels Redline (1968-1977). I will not post all of Hot Wheels Redline cars, just some to give you an idea what I am collecting (if some of you never heard of Hot Wheels Redline). 

 

 

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1 hour ago, PocketArt said:

Yes, I understand this.  Hobby's I suppose are sort of like genre, using music as a analogy.  We all collect different "things" so each hobby shares a language that is identifiable among collectors in that particular "genre."  rrantique knows what I said, but I should share a bit more with this particular vein of collectibles so all are on the same wave length.  Apologize for previous terms mumu.  I'll post a few pics with description concerning Indian Artifacts!  Never thought I'd do this on a coin forum- but here goes!

 

This projectile in center is a piece I found about 15 years ago.  It's a Paleo piece known as a Folsom type, noted for it's discovery at a paleolithic site in Folsom, New Mexico.  The Paleolithic hunters of North America are believed to have crossed the land bridge between Alaska and Russia some 14,000-15,000 years BC.  Paleolithic peoples were nomadic hunters- they followed the meat.  The projectile was either used as a knife, or, as a projectile in conjunction with the atl-atl, a spear throwing device used to fell big game.  Such as the Mastodon.     

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This relic is known as the 3/4 grooved axe.  It wasn't used to chop down trees, but used perhaps for girdling trees, "burn down tree."  I believe it was more of a utilitarian tool to bust open the brisket of a deer, elk, or, other large game for easier consumption in the process of cleaning game.  This particular relic is middle-archaic, roughly 3,000-4,000 BC.

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The next item was one of spiritual qualities, and of relaxation.  This is a pipe, made out of green banded slate.  This was a late archaic item- about 3,000 years BC.

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This particular piece is known as an atl-atl weight.  It was on the spear throwing device, and believed used as a counterbalance.  The atl-atl was used before the bow and arrow came into use with North American indigenous people.  It is a middle archaic piece, and is roughly 4,000 BC.

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Lastly, to bring up to "historic" times.  A gun flint.  This was an item that was traded to indigenous peoples as the influence of European technology took hold, and shed light on our proud native inhabitants of nearly 16,000-17,000 years.  There's always a better way- perhaps not the "best" way, but a means...

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All items are personal finds throughout Northwest Ohio.  There's many relics that are waiting to be found.  The story in stone is yet another chapter of our pre-history / history.

 

Rich  

I like the pipe and the axe Rich.

 

Keeping it coin related.

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Edited by rrantique

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Finding relics from BC era must be something else while looking.

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Nice hobbies here, love the thread! 

is it just me or is this word impossible to pronounce? Lincolniana 

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Regarding "Lincolniana", always wondered who came up with this tongue-twister. At cocktail parties I tell people I collect "Lincoln stuff". They still wander off. Very informative thread.

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As many of you know, I collect space memorabilia, particularly pieces from the 1957 - 1975 time frame (launch of Sputnik to end of Apollo era).  My original collecting goal was to collect at least one flown item from every Mercury, Gemini and Apollo (MGA) mission.  There were 27 missions in total, 6, 10 and 11 respectively, with another 4 post Apollo flights using Apollo equipment; Skylabs 1 - 3, and Apollo-Soyuz.  Along the way, I've branched out into trying to collect at least one signature from all the astronauts on the assorted MGA flights, as well as the very earliest Soviet space missions (Vostok).  I've also picked up a certain amount of Skylab material, as well as Space Shuttle material.  One of the neatest aspects of the whole process is that I've met and had the chance to talk with 12 of the 24 men who went to the Moon including 6 of the 12 who walked on the Moon.  The centerpiece of my collection is the Flight Plan for Apollo 12, in essence the log for the second manned Moon landing.  

 

 

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World globes, check out my avatar. Also have collections of playing cards with advertising or political themes, Coke back National Geographic magazines, PEZ dispensers, McDonald's Happy Meal toys, vintage milk caps, etc., etc. Once had a nice collection of coconut heads but that was where my wife drew the line.

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On Monday I visited the Antique Fan Museum in Zionsville, Indiana. That was a new hobby to me, but I don't anticipate joining the club. Still, it was fun to see what others had achieved in the field. 

I recommend any interested persons wait until summertime to visit that museum. All of those fans running in wintertime has left me with a cold. 

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18 hours ago, PocketArt said:

Yes, I understand this.  Hobby's I suppose are sort of like genre, using music as a analogy.  We all collect different "things" so each hobby shares a language that is identifiable among collectors in that particular "genre."  rrantique knows what I said, but I should share a bit more with this particular vein of collectibles so all are on the same wave length.  Apologize for previous terms mumu.  I'll post a few pics with description concerning Indian Artifacts!  Never thought I'd do this on a coin forum- but here goes!

 

This projectile in center is a piece I found about 15 years ago.  It's a Paleo piece known as a Folsom type, noted for it's discovery at a paleolithic site in Folsom, New Mexico.  The Paleolithic hunters of North America are believed to have crossed the land bridge between Alaska and Russia some 14,000-15,000 years BC.  Paleolithic peoples were nomadic hunters- they followed the meat.  The projectile was either used as a knife, or, as a projectile in conjunction with the atl-atl, a spear throwing device used to fell big game.  Such as the Mastodon.     

005.JPG.94fcc0ca7b5be5571e21ecb20b5ae451.JPG  

 

This relic is known as the 3/4 grooved axe.  It wasn't used to chop down trees, but used perhaps for girdling trees, "burn down tree."  I believe it was more of a utilitarian tool to bust open the brisket of a deer, elk, or, other large game for easier consumption in the process of cleaning game.  This particular relic is middle-archaic, roughly 3,000-4,000 BC.

007.JPG.840ad68cad329d65ad911191ba55343a.JPG    

 

The next item was one of spiritual qualities, and of relaxation.  This is a pipe, made out of green banded slate.  This was a late archaic item- about 3,000 years BC.

 009.JPG.f5961a00aec75e0920890be709b28ea8.JPG

 

This particular piece is known as an atl-atl weight.  It was on the spear throwing device, and believed used as a counterbalance.  The atl-atl was used before the bow and arrow came into use with North American indigenous people.  It is a middle archaic piece, and is roughly 4,000 BC.

008.JPG.04fa9bfca3269b9cd2dab003f99ff0c1.JPG

 

Lastly, to bring up to "historic" times.  A gun flint.  This was an item that was traded to indigenous peoples as the influence of European technology took hold, and shed light on our proud native inhabitants of nearly 16,000-17,000 years.  There's always a better way- perhaps not the "best" way, but a means...

015.JPG.d9cd4b1521326188d03d7d93ccb25f6c.JPG

 

All items are personal finds throughout Northwest Ohio.  There's many relics that are waiting to be found.  The story in stone is yet another chapter of our pre-history / history.

 

Rich  

Rich, those are really incredible.

When you go out looking for them, do you go to places where, when you get there, you can just tell that it should be a good place to search?

And then when there, does it take long to find something?

I'm imagining you climbing up boulders to cliff bases, then looking for petroglyphs, and then figuring out where camps could have been nearby.

Maybe find some of the spear-tips where natural "kill zones" might have existed, like cliff drop-offs, or old river banks where cornering would have been possible.

Something like that?

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Thanks Bob- Not any cliffs, or, bluffs in my neck of the woods- but those are good ideas. I’ve had a lot of success hunting plowed fields that are adjacent to rivers, creeks, spring fed ponds, or, natural lakes.  Usually the best places to look on the plowed fields are the highest points, or, ridges.  You want to make sure though that the plowed field has had a good rain before venturing out.  Some of the clues I look for that tell me I’ve stumbled across a site are fine flint chips, flakes, and fire cracked rock.  That’s usually an indication that there was habitation for a period of time.  Really good fields that I’ve found several artifacts from are quite rare.  After 100-125 years of farming, many relics have already been picked up, usually the largest, and what you find anymore are typically broken projectiles, and smaller intact pieces.  It’s rare to find a large knife without a plow ding, an axe without plow scars, or, even some of the more beautiful banded slate banner stones and ceremonial relics that are already broken.  Sometimes if you find a good field that had significant erosion exposing a layer of earth that hasn‘t been worked; you might find a large relic but that’s just dumb luck really.  Many of the small earthen burial mounds along the higher points by a river have been plowed over too.  The bones have since turned to dust but the stone burial implements are left; drug and scattered by the plow through the years.   Most of these knives, spear points, and other stone relics from burials were large, nicely flaked, and made out of exotic materials- usually precious flints, beautiful green, brown, and red banded slates, and granite with porphyry inclusions that are quite spectacular.

Some other tips you should consider is that you need an up to date Plat book of your county.  You can get that from the Bureau of Land Management.  This is important, as you’re out and about looking for sites you know who the owner is so you can get permission to walk their property.  Many times I’ve been turned down prospective sites because others had ruined it for me- walking fields without permission, or, walking on crops.  I’ve taken “friends” out to some of my fields only to find them returning next spring and walking them before I had a chance!  Good sites are hard to find- once you do find a good field, best to keep to yourself, and stay on good terms with the farmer.  I can spend an hour just speaking with the farmer before even walking the field.  It’s a fun hobby, and can be rewarding with a little patience, and persistence.

Lastly, I’d caution against buying Indian Artifacts unless you know someone that has knowledge, and is trustworthy that can help you make a purchase.  There are many fakes on the market, and there are even authentic relics that have been re-chipped, or, slate items that have been scrubbed, reworked, puttied, and recolored.  Some relics bring very strong money- so there are similar bandits who try to make a fast buck in this hobby too.

Hope this helps,

Rich           

Edited by PocketArt

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Awesome stuff guys! I like the arrowheads, the hot wheels stuff, cigar boxes, well heck, all of its pretty cool. Besides coins, I collect vintage wristwatches and and a couple pocket watches. I have a bit of Harley-Davidson stuff, Dallas Cowboy stuff and then a few old guns. 

 

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I collect puzzles.

The interest goes back to my childhood when, with so many brothers and sisters, a jigsaw puzzle would be a Holiday gift to the family, we'd set up a card table, and slowly piece it together.  Herb Alpert would be on the stereo (Whipped Cream and Other Delights), a fire would be warming the living room in the fireplace, everyone home for vacation, and just really good times.

From jigsaws I've branched to Puzzle Boxes, of which Karakuri Creation Group mind benders are a subset, and most people don't know anything about these, but they are gorgeous works of art, finely crafted, made from exotic woods, and involve clever opening mechanisms.

To further round out my collection, I headed toward mechanical disentanglement puzzles, Tucker Jones House wrought irons, for example, and many of the Will Strijbos (his stuff is so good) aluminum puzzles.

I figure I have around 50 puzzles, and many of the more beautiful ones I just haven't gotten around to even attempting to solve.

To solve them, you keep a notebook, a diary so to speak.  And you describe your progress.  Although just about every puzzle comes with a sealed opening diagram/instructions packet, I have only resorted to that once, and I forever regretted it.  You only have one chance to solve a puzzle, and then, forever, for you, its secret is known, and it cannot become unknown.  So you cheat yourself by looking up the solution.

So, how do they get solved?

You chip away at their secrets.  You shake them to see if they have a rattle, you gently push and pry on panels, you probe them for metal by bringing a magnet close by, and you imagine yourself as the creator of the puzzle, and what might be a nuanced approach to a locking mechanism.

There is nothing like the feeling of being completely stumped, maybe for over a month, and suddenly, for some unknown reason, you accidentally test a path you happen to think of, and something changes, the puzzle is different all of the sudden, and you have the sneaking suspicion that you're on to something.  And then something else loosens up.

Imagine if you received a puzzle box gift as a child, you don't have the solution (or the solution is enclosed within it, just for completeness, to make it whole after the puzzle box has been solved by trial and error), and when you finally do solve it, a beautiful coin is found within, maybe even a slabbed coin within that has some value, or is just beautiful to behold.  Think how that would change your life, having that special gift.  It's very magical.

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