Secondary market value for "Registered Sets?"
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Does anyone have reliable information on the resale value of "Registered Sets?" For example, when a collector of such sets dies how much of the original cost was recovered for his/her Estate?

 

I ask because the high prices paid for common coins seems driven by these "Registered Sets," yet little is said about the secondary market for the coins. Is it truly money wasted or is there some retention of value?

 

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You mean, a Registry Set?

 

In the vast majority of cases, I would assume that the registry set is broken up, sold individually, and with no mention of it having been a registry set. A registry set isn't really important unless it has won an award, or it is in the top couple of sets. The vast majority of sets don't meet these criteria - they are just an average collectors work and coins. Those top sets may get mentioned on the label - but usually a top set is going to have top coins anyways, and top coins are always going to sell well. It isn't really a function of the registry.

 

As for high grade moderns, which is what I'm guessing you are really asking - I think you and I both know that those don't sell well.

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I just saw a registry set auctioned by Heritage. It was the second ranked set in a particular series. I asked that same question to the owner. He sold the set to buy a house overseas. He hasn't relied yet, but from the pieces that I picked up from his set - it seems that after the auction fees are deducted the set did not fair all that well. It may have just been bad timing, however. It is also just one data point, so no conclusions should be made.

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Modern coins do sell well if they are marketed right. Have you been following top pop moderns lately? Probably not.

01/08/2017 Heritage auctions weekly ---- state quarters. You might be surprised of the hammer prices for so called non selling modern coins. lol

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I've heard both good and bad things.

 

I met a gentleman at a show about 5 years ago that told me that he lost over $20K when he sold his top ten ranking Washington quarter set.

 

Yet, I've also known others who have made substantial profits above and beyond simply recouping their money.

 

I guess it all depends on the economy, market timing, popularity of a series and optimal grade level, as well as, whether you purchased them right and also how long you have held them.

 

So.....there are many factors at work here and no 'one size fits all' answer. JMHO.

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Unless the set is at the top of the registry, I can't see how it's and advantage to sell it as a set. Selling the whole thing in mass forces many would be buyers to purchase duplicates, which many collectors don't like to do. Selling single pieces pulls in more potential bidders or buyers.

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Unsurprisingly a great deal depends on whether one bought the metal or the plastic. No matter how you select coins whether on strike, surfaces, or "eye appeal" if you like a coin odds are good someone else will as well.

 

If you just buy plastic you'll end up with a lot of coins that are simply "maxed out" and you'll pay plastic prices for common metal.

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Modern coins do sell well if they are marketed right. Have you been following top pop moderns lately? Probably not.

01/08/2017 Heritage auctions weekly ---- state quarters. You might be surprised of the hammer prices for so called non selling modern coins. lol

 

I agree with Rick, it HAS been impressive...

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This thread got me curious to look at what these quarters are selling for.

 

First one I see:

 

https://coins.ha.com/itm/statehood-quarters/quarters-and-twenty-cents/2003-d-25c-illinois-ms68-pcgs-pcgs-population-17-0-ngc-census-6-0-from-the-mile-high-collection/a/1251-9540.s?ic4=ListView-ShortDescription-071515#

 

Can someone please explain how this grades 68? I see marks all over. I know some of it is die chatter, but still. The face/neck is covered in nicks.

 

Now I just opened the Maine 2003 D and the marks are even worse!

 

https://coins.ha.com/itm/statehood-quarters/quarters-and-twenty-cents/2003-d-25c-maine-ms68-pcgs-pcgs-population-9-0-ngc-census-12-0-from-the-mile-high-collection/a/1251-9542.s?ic4=ListView-ShortDescription-071515#

 

I mainly collect Latin American these days, but if I applied the standards I know for 19th Century LA coins, these wouldn't break 66, if that. What am I missing?

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Awful. The hits on the neck are sufficient to render it no better than MS63. Too much rests on the plastic.

 

+1

 

I hate to say it but this one may have even spent a few days in commerce. :sick:

 

I am left aghast by the prices of such common, modern coins.

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Yeah, I was watching some of the Prooflikes. They went for a bit higher than I wanted to chase, although I *really* wanted that 69PL South Carolina quarter.

 

The quarter I wanted went for $3500.... I dropped out at $350, which I felt was already a really strong price.... https://coins.ha.com/itm/statehood-quarters/2000-p-25c-south-carolina-ms69-prooflike-ngc-ngc-census-1-0-pcgs-population-1-0-from-the-mile-high-collection/a/1251-9533.s?ic2=mybidspage-lotlinks-12202013&tab=MyBids-101116

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Yeah, I was watching some of the Prooflikes. They went for a bit higher than I wanted to chase, although I *really* wanted that 69PL South Carolina quarter.

 

The quarter I wanted went for $3500.... I dropped out at $350, which I felt was already a really strong price.... https://coins.ha.com/itm/statehood-quarters/2000-p-25c-south-carolina-ms69-prooflike-ngc-ngc-census-1-0-pcgs-population-1-0-from-the-mile-high-collection/a/1251-9533.s?ic2=mybidspage-lotlinks-12202013&tab=MyBids-101116

 

That's beyond crazy......:insane:

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