1980 uniface D roosevelt dime
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1,043 posts

It is PMD (Post Mint Damage). Someone machined iy down or something like that, It's worth 10 cents.

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I would be willing to bet on it.

 

Whatever machine markings left on it would be quickly worn away in circulation. It could have been anything, people have done all sorts of things with coins since coins were a thing.

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There is also a secondary ring only visible when light is shone on at a certain angle. Other than that it appears to be entirely smooth with no hint of the strike other than the dimple that occurs in the center.

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AHFreak is correct. It was damaged after leaving the US mint. It's worth a dime.

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Yes. It is a damaged/mutilated dime. With luck, you can spend it a your local 7-11.

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1980?

 

While I do believe that its PMD, I doubt that it was machined given the fact that the actual nickel cladding is really thin on these coins.

 

Maybe a shot or the edge would reveal more about how it was created.

Edited by 19Lyds

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There is also a secondary ring only visible when light is shone on at a certain angle. Other than that it appears to be entirely smooth with no hint of the strike other than the dimple that occurs in the center.

 

At first glance, it appears to have been machined into a button face. I wouldn't mind seeing larger photographs, but this does not resemble any known form of mint error.

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I posted more pictures on the facebook post to show the edge better. The thing is that the clad layer is intact all the way around the dimple around the center and looks way to uniform to be anything but pressed to my eyes ... I am by no means an expert but it just seems too uniform, like I said.

Edited by evarcane

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323 posts

It may have gotten caught in a clothes dryer and then circulated. That would explain the raised round bump in the center. I have a cent that came out of our dryer that looks virtually identical, minus the circulation wear. :)

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And for the face of the coin to not have any damage on it whatsoever seems kind of odd too.

 

 

Aliens.jpg

Edited by mumu

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A bit of friendly advice...never ask a question if you are going to refuse to accept the same answer from multiple people.

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There are many ways the dime might have been damaged or intentionally mutilated. But for your coin, they are all just guesses. So far as the Treasury Dept is concerned, the dime is mutilated metal and has no value.

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Evarcane, ask yourself how something like that could have been produced at the mint. Answer: no way. It was damaged after it left the mint. Look at the reverse image you posted very carefully---there is (to me) evidence of tooling. It looks like someone may have tried to make a button out of a Rosie. No reputable grading firm will grade that. It is worth ten cents, no more.

 

One other thing comes to mind. In order to properly evaluate a coin, you first need to understand how real ones are made (i.e., the details of the minting process). If you don't understand this well, you cannot really determine what a piece represents--e.g., a genuine & properly made coin, a genuine mint error, a genuine coin but damaged after it left the mint, an altered coin, a complete fake.

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So far as the Treasury Dept is concerned, the dime is mutilated metal and has no value.

It is still identifiable as a US coin so they will redeem it for it's face value.

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Actually, the Treasury would not have to redeem it...but they will as a common courtesy. Of course, it will cost 49-cents to mail it....

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Either way, it's a pretty neat coin and I think I'll hold onto it for that reason alone. Thank you for all of your help and insight. I have always been interested in coins since childhood and will be keeping my eyes on my change.

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