5 Bust half 50¢ - Opinions on submission?
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177 posts

The five bust halves pictured below are from my father’s collection. He passed on to the great coin show in the sky last year and I am just now starting to go through some of the boxes he left me.

 

I realize the pictures are mediocre because they are in old beat-up filthy 2x2 flips, and I did not remove them from the old flips simply because I don’t have any new flips at the moment.

 

So with that in mind…..

 

I’m looking for an over all opinion on if these five coins are worth being submitted for authentication and variety plus or should I just keep them raw. In my uneducated opinion they would all come back with a details grade for one reason or another, such as cleaned, scratched etc.

 

I don’t have much of a US collection as I focus mostly on Newfoundland coins. I do have a good many Morgan’s and Peace dollars but that is the extent of my US knowledge. When I was looking up these bust halves I noticed that there are many varieties in this series. I don’t have a book to look up the varieties so I was thinking on submitting them to NGC under the variety plus tier.

 

The one coin out of the 5 that really got my interest was the 1812 in that to me it looks like it might be a fake. All the pictures I found of this date don’t show a large 8 that is so low compared to the rest of the numerals.

 

So the question is even though they most likely would come back details, is it still worth getting them slabbed to have the varieties identified?

 

All opinions would be appreciated. Thanks so much

Have a great day

Jim

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12,823 posts

The 1812 looks genuine to me.

 

And you should be able to get some help with variety attribution without having to foot the bill for authentication and grading. I think that would be an unnecessary expense.

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794 posts

I'm not a knowledgeable bust half collector, but that 1823 looks like a O-101/R3, Broken 3 variety. That 3 is pretty cool looking to me!

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The 1823 is indeed a broken 3, which is a popular variety. In that grade, it isn't really worth it to get it graded.

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You could try ICG with about $10 a coin on their economy tier, plus they have done attribution for free, but you will have to pay return shipping, for some reason the grading services charge $20 minimum on return shipping unless you have a corporate account with usps, in which case it will still cost around $20 minimum return shipping on the account.

 

In one of the coin clubs I'm a member of Bust halves usually go over $100 a piece in their auction, even VGs.

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Thank You for the replies and suggestions. No disrespect but as far as ICG goes I've never seen a properly graded coin in an ICG holder. For slabbed coins I stick with PCGS and NGC. Again thank you for the replies.

 

Have a great day

Jim

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I've seen plenty of properly graded coins in ICG holders, and many undergraded ones as well, I would say their accuracy rate is over 90%, except for moderns in the near perfect grades. Mr. Fazzari is one of their main graders and if you bother to check their bios on the graders there you may want to revise your opinion.

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This is just one example of why I steer away from ICG. I bought this coin on Ebay, and yes it's my own fault for shopping on Ebay with an unknown seller, but the pictures as you can see from my quick photo below do not show the gouge between the W & F in Newfoundland at around 7:00pm that is so deep it almost goes half way through the coin. Of course the seller never mentioned it and the pictures do not show it due to it's location, and the seller did not except returns on graded / slabbed coins. And I figured OH ICG should be OK right? If this was a NGC it would have gotten details due to the hairlines or the deep gouge or both. If it was PCGS it would have been labeled Genuine. How could ICG slab a coin with a hole so deep you can put a pen point in it and not note that on the slab? Well I chalked it up to a lesson learned and with this being the second ICG slab I have revived with issues that are not noted on the label so I steer away from ICG. I do not blame ICG for the error, I blame *ME* for trusting the Slab with out getting better pictures. But you get the idea. Thanks again.

 

Have a great day

Jim

 

Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr the web site is throwing up server errors when I try to attach the photo. But you get the idea.

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If the problems were as blatantly obvious as described, I would wonder if it was the coin that was originally in the slab, or if it is counterfeit slab.

 

One mistake, if in fact it was a mistake, should not condemn the TPG.

 

After all, you did not send the coin to ICG, you bought it on EBay. If it is a mistake on their part, I would think that ICG would respond, if contacted.

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Unless any of the coins are R 5 or higher I would advise you to save your money as there is no added value in getting these coins graded. As Mark Feld posted you should be able to get some help with the attribution without sending the coins in for a grade.

 

Edited by Mark T

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Jim,

 

Your 1812 is genuine. It is the Overton 108a. die marriage.

The 1823 is O-101--better known as the "Broken 3" variety.

The 1826 looks to be O-111.

The 1834 is O-121. It is an interesting example because it was actually struck in 1835 after the 1835 O-101 and O-102 both of which exhibit an earlier die stage of the same reverse die.

 

As for submitting, IMO, none of these are sufficiently rare or high grade to be worth the fees. Save your money.

 

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Jim,

 

Your 1812 is genuine. It is the Overton 108a. die marriage.

The 1823 is O-101--better known as the "Broken 3" variety.

The 1826 looks to be O-111.

The 1834 is O-121. It is an interesting example because it was actually struck in 1835 after the 1835 O-101 and O-102 both of which exhibit an earlier die stage of the same reverse die.

 

As for submitting, IMO, none of these are sufficiently rare or high grade to be worth the fees. Save your money.

 

Outstanding okbustchaser, thank you for the recommendation. It is very appreciated.

 

Have a great day

Jim

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That should save you a submission, but since they were a family gift you will probably keep them for a long time.

 

On the ebay problem coin, I would just say returns are an absolute right, not a privilege. If you buy a coin with the problem you described both the seller and the grading service should make good. Personally I don't want unhappy customers in any way shape or form, they are free to return for a full refund. I had a customer that indicated unhappiness with a piece of currency where I was losing a little money anyway, and I asked him a couple times to just send it back for the refund. The last thing I would want is someone feeling they must keep something because they bought it with some implicit final deal. If someone contacted me a year or two after a transaction wanting to sell something back to me, I would do everything I could to make sure he/she was happy with the process and not feel stuck.

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Jim,

 

Your 1812 is genuine. It is the Overton 108a. die marriage.

The 1823 is O-101--better known as the "Broken 3" variety.

The 1826 looks to be O-111.

The 1834 is O-121. It is an interesting example because it was actually struck in 1835 after the 1835 O-101 and O-102 both of which exhibit an earlier die stage of the same reverse die.

 

As for submitting, IMO, none of these are sufficiently rare or high grade to be worth the fees. Save your money.

 

Thank you for saving me the work.

 

:)

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