Why had I not seen this before?
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For the most part, I am not an error coin collector except that I think coins displaying clashed dies are rather cool.

 

In numismatic circles, I understand that there is discussion as to whether a clashed die is an error coin or not. My opinion lies somewhere in between and I think that the error occurred to the dies when they clashed together without a planchet. Subsequently, every coin thereafter correctly struck with that die pair carries the image of that one error.

 

A clashed die occurs when the hammer die, usually the obverse die, clashes against the anvil die, usually the reverse die. The striking force of the dies clashing together leaves portions of the opposing dies image on the face of each die. This then transfers to every subsequent coin thereafter using that die pair.

 

Since I have purchased a macro photography rig much like the one THE BRG COLLECTION uses to image his coins, I have methodically gone through my collection to re-image my coins. I still have a ways to go, but I have made significant progress. I have been particularly anxious to re-image the smallest of my coins, in other words my Type 1-3 gold dollars. The Type 1 gold dollar at 13mm and the Type 2 & 3 at 15mm stood to benefit the most from macro photography.

 

The things I saw in my coins using macro photography that I had missed before have fascinated me. That is particularly true about my NGC MS-62 1857 Type 3 gold dollar. While I knew that it was a clashed die coin because of the outline of the obverse bust on the reverse, I had not noticed the transference of the letters ERTY from Lady Libertys headdress to the reverse. When I saw it, I thought to myself, How cool; now why had I not seen this before?

 

Describing how this happened gets very interesting because the coins are an exact mirror of the dies. If the coin has incuse details, the die has those details in relief. Where the coin has details in relief, the die has those in incuse. Interestingly, the word LIBERTY in the headdress of my gold dollar is incuse on the coin. Therefore, the obverse die, which is in relief, struck the open field of the reverse die leaving an incuse impression. This then transferred to my coin in relief. Did you get that? I had to read this sentence several times to make sure I got it right.

 

What is particularly neat is that this die clash flattened the ERTY relief of the obverse die except where portions of the R were protected by the incuse 7 of the reverse die. Wow! Can you tell I get excited about this stuff? Only a coin geek like me and perhaps some of you will find this fascinating. I am posting two pictures on the chat boards, the one will show the outline of the bust on the reverse and the other the fine details of what I have been describing. Remember when viewing the detailed photo that this coin is only 15mm in diameter. Its amazing what you can see using macro photography.

Gary

 

See more journals by gherrmann44

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Neat coin, and great photos! One of my "treasures" from my early collecting days is a 1814 Bust half with so much clashing that you can see essentially all of the reverse design on the obverse and the obverse design on the reverse. Your $1 is more subtle but just as interesting.

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these can be tricky...When I first got back into coin collecting as an adult I first started to collect the 3c nickels. These little beauties are notorious for clashed dies--in fact it almost appears as if it would be a greater challenge to find a 3c nickel without a clashed die.

 

What is tricky is that the image is truly reversed--letters are not only reversed but also inverted and convex becomes concave....the E R T Y on the clash are almost easier to see than on the headband....

 

.........great find, aren't coins fun?...just when you think you know your collection you discover something like this when you're not even looking for it.

Edited by jackson64

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Holy close-up images! Gary, those pics are awesome! I really love clashed dies, and I particularly like this one! (thumbs u

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I suspect you would enjoy reading my book "From Mine to Mint." It gives lots of details about minting technology, machinery and operations for about 1835 to 1937.

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Hi Gary,

That's a very cool clashed die ! It immediately reminded me of a 1880 Indian Cent die clash reverse (Snow- S1) where the denticles of the obverse run in a similiar manner from about 1 o'clock thru the E in One and the top of the N of Cent on the cent's reverse. The indian cent variety is worth about a 5X premium. Your die clash seems pretty dramatic, I am not sure what premium it commands. Clashed dies are pretty common in the "small" 19th century coinage, and its one of the reasons I like collecting 3 cent silvers and Liberty Seated half dimes.

Great photos also !

Best Regards,

 

Rich

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I suspect you would enjoy reading my book "From Mine to Mint." It gives lots of details about minting technology, machinery and operations for about 1835 to 1937.

 

Yes, thank you, I already have a signed copy of your book and it is fascinating the amount of exhaustive research you present in it. "From Mine to Mint" is an excellent book that I heartily recommend to every student of the hobby. In fact I would go as far to say that it is a must have for any numismatic library. If there are others on these boards interested, the book "From Mine to Mint" can be purchased from Wizard Coin Supply.

Gary

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Since I have purchased a macro photography rig much like the one THE BRG COLLECTION uses to image his coins

 

Is that a Digital SLR set up or a USB Microscope type deal? Your pictures look much better than mine with this USB Micro so if that is what you were using I was curious as to which one?

 

I found myself pulling my Type 1 out based on this Journal Entry thinking I may have over looked something but it does not look as though I did.

 

Good info, btw.

 

 

 

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Just for myself so I could figure out exactly what I was looking at I did this. Forgive me for not asking permission to use your pics. Feel free to have this one. -Doug

138956.jpg.9b55d4c13d47b95f9d53cf9aeac52735.jpg

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