Week 546 Happy Friday!
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Q: This famous counterfeiter was never jailed, sentenced or even tried for his crime even though the U.S government knew 100% certainty who was behind the counterfeiting. The fact that he was counterfeiting was actually applauded by those around him. His notes are still obtainable today and are called after his last name. Who was this counterfeiter?

 

 

Our first place winner will receive a coupon for 1 note graded under the Standard grading tier. (You must have an active account with PMG,call PMG for details) There will also be a runner up prize given to a randomly selected player with the correct answer.

 

REMINDER: The Numisma-Quest ends on Saturday at midnight EST. Entries after that time will not be valid. See the Trivia info post for more details.

 

Good luck to everyone and have a great weekend!

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J.S.G. Boggs (born Steve Litzner) is most famous for his hand drawn, one-sided United States bills that he then exchanges for goods and services just like real money. Boggs' drawings show the hand of a master draftsman so much so that he has been arrested for his counterfeiting in England and Australia. Boggs was acquitted in both cases on the grounds that he was creating art and not forging or counterfeiting currency and trying to pass it off as such.

 

 

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Q:This famous counterfeiter was never jailed, sentenced or even tried for his crime even though the U.S government knew 100% certainty who was behind the counterfeiting. The fact that he was counterfeiting was actually applauded by those around him. His notes are still obtainable today and are called after his last name. Who was this counterfeiter?

 

Answer: Samuel C. Upham

 

 

Looks like this was a challenging question this week! Congratulations to our winner, TheSharpGun, and our runner up, Einstein0505. Your prizes will be going out to you ASAP.

 

Have a great week everyone!

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Wikipedia article on Upham is very interesting! At the end it notes:

 

When Upham died of stomach cancer in 1885,[1]a minor mystery ensued over the whereabouts of his wealth. His estate was valued at $4,889.97, but he claimed to have sold upwards of $50,000 worth of counterfeit notes during the war. The proceeds of his counterfeiting operation have never been found.

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