Show me your Star Designation!
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486 posts in this topic

5c-26d_small.jpg

 

OK, NGC gave this a STAR but certainly not for the strike. lol It's a typical 26-D though and the obverse is gem as far as I'm concerned. Overall grade makes sense at MS63.

 

jom

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The newest Star in the sky. I sent it in for regrade, hoping for a 66FBL (or even a 65+ FBL), but alas, no such luck. They did however, finally, give it the Star that it so deserves. It is now graded 65* FBL:

 

1963NGCms66fblObvHR02_1.jpg

1963NGCms66fblRevHR08_1.jpg

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Here are my star designations: NGC-290, Star birth in galaxy M-83, Spiral galaxies NGC-2207 & IC-2163. (Images courtesy NASA, Hubble Space Telescope Institute and European Space Agency.)

 

NGC290jpg.jpgStarBirthinGalaxyM83.jpg

 

SpiralGalaxiesNGC2207andIC2163.jpg

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What does it take to get a PF-70 CAM on Franklin Halves? If it is unachievable, then the 69* should be the Holy Grail....or can NGC actually grade a PF-70 in this series????

 

 

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What does it take to get a PF-70 CAM on Franklin Halves? If it is unachievable, then the 69* should be the Holy Grail....or can NGC actually grade a PF-70 in this series????

 

The star in this case simply has to do with the cameo contrast. It is basically NGC's way of saying the coin is better than a PR69Cameo, but not as good as a PR69UCAM. I don't know if NGC has graded any PR70(Cameo etc.) Franklins. Assuming it hasn't, the ultimate for an NGC Franklin would be a PR69*UCAM.

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RWB..... I think those are AT! They really are you know, they have to take those images with different spectrum lenses to get those colors!

 

As a guy with a doctorate specializing in satellite imagery, basically there are a couple of ways those images can be created. Multi-spectral imaging means that various wavelengths are imaged. EACH of those images, let's say in the near infrared wavelength (NIR), is STRICTLY black and white. All the image shows is the intensity of either the (in the NIR case) reflected energy or, in longer wavelengths, emitted energy. The image can then either be manipulated directly whereby different colors are assigned to different pixels with selected values, or you can also create a false color image another way. In the latter case you plug the image into one of the three color guns on a computer; red, green, or blue. Then you plug OTHER WAVELENGTH images into each of the other two color guns. Different items will reflect/emit differently at different wavelengths, and depending on what you are looking for you will plug different wavelength images into the 3 different color guns. A true color image would appear when you plugged the red wavelength image into the red gun, the green wavelength image into the green gun, and the blue wavelength image into the blue gun. Most useful satellite imagery is done using the 3 color gun approach, or truthfully, in MANY different wavelengths in which case you are using a statistical approach.

 

 

 

EDITED: To change the word camera to computer.

Edited by SkyMan
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What does it take to get a PF-70 CAM on Franklin Halves? If it is unachievable, then the 69* should be the Holy Grail....or can NGC actually grade a PF-70 in this series????

 

 

A quick check of the Pops shows no 70's. There are 93 69UCAMs for the entire series.

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RWB..... I think those are AT! They really are you know, they have to take those images with different spectrum lenses to get those colors!
As a guy with a doctorate specializing in satellite imagery, basically there are a couple of ways those images can be created. Multi-spectral imaging means that various wavelengths are imaged. EACH of those images, let's say in the near infrared wavelength (NIR), is STRICTLY black and white. All the image shows is the intensity of either the (in the NIR case) reflected energy or, in longer wavelengths, emitted energy. The image can then either be manipulated directly whereby different colors are assigned to different pixels with selected values, or you can also create a false color image another way. In the latter case you plug the image into one of the three color guns on a camera; red, green, or blue. Then you plug OTHER WAVELENGTH images into each of the other two color guns. Different items will reflect/emit differently at different wavelengths, and depending on what you are looking for you will plug different wavelength images into the 3 different color guns. A true color image would appear when you plugged the red wavelength image into the red gun, the green wavelength image into the green gun, and the blue wavelength image into the blue gun. Most useful satellite imagery is done using the 3 color gun approach, or truthfully, in MANY different wavelengths in which case you are using a statistical approach.
So, I believe in layman terms, you just agreed with me! lol

 

On another note, Jim, I believe that the 56 is the most common (if there is such a thing) Franklin in 69 cam/ucam or any other cam/ ucam grade out there. They really over did the dies that year as far as polishing and over treating the surfaces. After that they learned their lesson and that's why the subsequent years, up to 59 are much more scarce.

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