Treeman

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  1. What's with the new "Advance Release"? Same coin, but you can get it in different plastic for only 5 times what it's worth!
  2. Popular issues drive new people into the hobby. If you want the same old proof sets, and other high production issues, buy them at a discount aftermarket. If you really want a lower production issue, pay up in the aftermarket. Pretty simple. Those who managed to get a sought after issue feel very gratified, those who do not get it complain. Then, usually, they blame it on flippers. If I think an issue will be "hot", I buy whatever the limit is, whether I collect that series or not. If I get them, I sell quick, and use the profit to get something I collect. I worry about my collection, and not whether or not you were as lucky. When I get skunked, I don't complain about the Mint, I just figure maybe I will get lucky next time. All in all, these issues do make people more aware of the hobby, and keep it from dying off with us older folks. All this is just my opinion, and we all know what an opinion is worth....
  3. First Day of Issue, Early Release, Special Holder, .... Remember when collectors would buy the coin, not the holder? Seems that, these days, the plastic brings more than the coin. Maybe HSN Mike Mazak is smarter that I thought.....
  4. I'm 68, and have been a collector for the last 45 years. I don't understand how you cannot see that making modern coins a bit harder to get actually benefits the hobby. People love the chase, makes acquiring more satisfying. If nothing interesting comes out of the mint occasionally, the hobby will die. By the way, I meant "grow up" in the sense of accepting reality, not in actual age. No disrespect meant, as I am not "grown up" in many ways...
  5. Two things people seem to have trouble understanding... 1) If the Mint doesn't occasionally make a lower mintage, desirable product, people lose interest in the modern market. By allowing some hope of getting a "winner", the hobby continues. ( For those who will say that they only want it for their collection, and don't care about value or scarcity.... If the market were flooded with 1793 Chain Cents, and they sold for 5 cents apiece, how many would love to own one? No challenge to find a nice example, no pride in owning a scarce piece...) 2) The Mint, like any other business, cannot afford to spend a fortune to add everything needed to support an onslaught of customers once, or twice, a year. People need to grow up. If you really want the coin, pay up in the aftermarket. If it's not worth it to you, then I guess you don't really want it. If it still seems hard to grasp what I'm saying, let me try it this way... I would like a nice BU 1978CC Morgan, but I don't like the price. How about you sell me yours for $25?
  6. Thanks. I have been around, but I usually just check out the posts, and rarely post myself...
  7. The truth is that there is no difference in most 69's and 70's from either grading service. Every time I mention this, I would get the same "you don't have the skill to see the difference between 69 and 70" response. However, if the description is no flaws under 5x, I use a 10x, and have found no flaws on many 69's, and have found flaws on 70's. This happens with both services, and my belief is that, during their few seconds of examination, it is most dependant on day of the week, or mood of the grader. Of course, the coin passes through the hands of more than one grader, but humans tend to bias toward a previous opinion. Now, perhaps the second grader does not see the 1st graders opinion, so maybe it's just the quick once over that causes the "mistakes". In any event, if you pay high premiums for a coin that, basically, has to be put under a microscope to see a difference, you are buying plastic, not the coin. The only reason any intelligent person would pay up for a "70" is for points on the registries. A true collector would buy the "69", and have plenty of money left to get another date/type. Okay, now everyone can rip me apart, but it is truly all about registry points. Making a common coin "rare" ,with a basically unnoticeable quality difference, should be left to Mike Mazak and HSN....
  8. Considering the large mintage, I would expect to be able to get one aftermarket for a small premium...
  9. Do they still melt junk silver coins? If so, any idea of how much each year?
  10. Where are the Silver Eagle Registry sets? Couldn't find them under "US"... Never mind, I am old, senile, and a bit blind. Don't know how I missed it first time.....
  11. If they didn't put out a low mintage piece occasionally, interest in the moderns might fall off. I think this helps generate interest in collecting, and actually helps the hobby....
  12. Yes, it was active! I put the coin in my "bag" at 12:00, then didn't finalize until 12:20, because I would get close to complete, get kicked off, and start again several times!
  13. Thanks for the info. I am just wanting to let them go, and get up some cash as quickly as possible. Retired now, and decided it would be more fun to get some upgrades on my truck. Hoping to get an idea of what they are worth, and the insight provided by you guys will help a lot. Thanks to everyone.