TomB

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About TomB

  • Boards Title
    TOTAL NEWBIE

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    www.tbnumismatics.com

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  1. Mr

    Your best bet for a reply would be to contact NGC Customer Service directly.
  2. Would You Buy This 2011 Gold Buffalo? (revealed)

    Obviously, the answer has been posted already, but I meant it when I wrote "No" because there would be no legitimate reason to be able to buy that coin for 80% of melt.
  3. PCGS vs NGC

    In the earliest days of NGC and PCGS existence, dealers (very few collectors had submission privileges at the time) would quite often prepare coins for submission back-and-forth between NGC and PCGS in order to chase the highest grade possible. This was not done with any form of altruism, but was done to maximize the sales price when they sold the coin. So, to answer your question, dealers sent coins to NGC and PCGS using a strategy to increase their bottom-line and would often ping-pong the coins between services if the possible payoff was attractive enough. Later, perhaps in the early 1990s (1992 or thereabouts) the two grading services started to diverge in what they looked for with respect to high grade type, which was much more popular to send in at the time than the modern coins or bullion pieces of today. In my observation and experience, NGC started to award higher grades to coins with original surfaces where the surfaces were devoid of marks, hits, scrapes, etc... whereas PCGS started to award higher grades to coins with great luster or extremely attractive toning. Over time, this started to weight the pools of coins seen in NGC and PCGS holders so that high grade, valuable coins in NGC holders were more likely to have muted surfaces or neutral-to-unattractive toning while coins from this same niche in PCGS holders were more likely to have good luster, cool toning and better arm's length eye appeal. Obviously, this was not universal and did not happen overnight, but I would think that by 1995-1997 there was a clear distinction between the pools of coins graded by the services that were available at auction or on the bourse. In my opinion, the early decisions by PCGS and NGC ended up harming NGC while helping PCGS establish a firm hold on the top spot in the eyes of many folks.
  4. Large cents and half cents

    Honestly, from what you have written I see no reason at all to send them in for certification. There are quite a few of them, they are relatively low grade and you acknowledge that most are not worth the cost of certification. Keep them raw and enjoy them. Buy some sewn-cotton square holders for them and place them inside 2x2 Kraft-style paper envelopes. You will enjoy being able to hold them in-hand, will not have invested the time and expense involved with certification and the coins will take up far less space. Regardless, it would be terrific to see images.
  5. Large cents and half cents

    Honestly, from what you have written I see no reason at all to send them in for certification. There are quite a few of them, they are relatively low grade and you acknowledge that most are not worth the cost of certification. Keep them raw and enjoy them. Buy some sewn-cotton square holders for them and place them inside 2x2 Kraft-style paper envelopes. You will enjoy being able to hold them in-hand, will not have invested the time and expense involved with certification and the coins will take up far less space. Regardless, it would be terrific to see images.
  6. 1881-CC Photography

    Take Mark Feld's advice and buy the book. You will not be sorry.
  7. Amusing Coin World article

    If the article is "Common" 1909 Lincoln, VDB cent is actually a Matte Proof rarity then you should make note that it is graded PR66RB and that the dealer who submitted it is sharing a portion of the proceeds with the variety attribution specialist who identified it as a matte proof and not with a grader at PCGS. If this is the article you read then your take on it and what is written are two very different things.
  8. PCGS vs NGC

    I used the term "might be" intentionally to add a shade of grey to the discussion. The coins "might be" more liquid or valuable because I might encounter a larger pool of dealers, clients and others who prefer, lean toward or require their coins to be in PCGS holders. In truth, I know many folks who will pass on common coins in NGC holders, but may buy those same common coins in PCGS holders. I have no issue with this since not only is it not my money or my business to dictate to others how to buy for their collections, but by definition "common coins" are common enough that they will likely be found in many flavor holders, so the buyer might be best-suited to have the patience to wait for the holder of their choice. Rare or especially unusual coins, however, might be best acquired when the opportunity arises, regardless of if they are in the buyer's preferred holder. I will state, though, that NGC has fallen behind PCGS in terms of brand perception within my niche areas for a large number of folks, but I would not consider this to mean they are "like all the other failed grading companies". After all, we are not about a binary decision process here of "success" or "failure". Rather, we have a relatively large pool of folks of various activity who might prefer one service over another across a continuum of services, prices, company responsiveness and grades and who support and respect each. That is not an on-off switch. My asking price is dictated by cost of acquisition, liquidity and likeliness of opportunity and cost of replacement as well as the characteristics of the coin. I, personally, do not factor into any price the certification company. As for Eric Newman or other sales, I think it extraordinarily unwise to surmise the contents of the negotiations that went into the decision making process unless one were involved in the details. You might just be shocked.
  9. NGC messes up again............

    While it is a pain-in-the-butt to limit images to less than 500kb, or thereabouts, threads like this might not add much to the solution if they aren't seen by NGC. Currently, there appear to be at least two sub-forums where your observation/complaint/rant might resonate better with those who may be able to change the parameters or characteristics of the message boards. There is the Change Requests and Voting sub-forum as well as the Message Boards Feedback/Suggestions sub-forum. Regardless, most computers contain software that allows one to reduce the file size of images and this might be a nice thing to know how to do, when needed.
  10. Post a blue coin

    I feel like Miles Davis in this thread (Kind of Blue). As such, here is the reverse of a coin that is "kind of blue", but also has a fair share of violet in the toning. It was plucked out of a double US mint set-
  11. ICCS Grading - Any Opinions?

    ICCS has been traditionally looked upon as the gold standard for Canadian coin certification in the eyes of many folks. While I believe that this was true at one time, I will also state that in my opinion ICCS is more lenient on surface issues than either NGC or PCGS while they are more conservative on grading standards with respect to remaining meat, also when compared to NGC or PCGS. As far as liquidity is concerned, it is also my opinion that ICCS is less liquid in the marketplace than either NGC or PCGS in the United States, though I do not know the status in Canada. My gut feel is that both NGC and PCGS have made up much ground in the Canadian market in recent years. Overall, I think that ICCS should be doing laps around NGC and PCGS with respect to Canadian coin grading, but they have not taken advantage of their position and it is likely only a matter of time before they are passed.
  12. PCGS vs NGC

    I am also a "toner type of guy" and CAC will refuse to sticker a coin they believe to be AT. For best results, send an email directly to them at info@caccoin.com and ask them if they will apply a CAC sticker to a coin they believe to be AT.
  13. Newest Nickel

    The images in the ebay listing look significantly juiced (altered color saturation). If you have images that are too large you might host them on another server or copy the image and save it with a higher compression setting. The compression setting will reduce the file size, but if you go too high you degrade the image quality, too.