zadok

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  1. jack webb didnt have time for any that poofy stuff......
  2. obviously not unique....prob not rare, poss scarce....reasonable to assume low hundreds??....there were (9) certified in that submission lot with identical error n grade.....2148532-001 thru 2148532-009 all same die crack same grade, possibly others in same submission with higher grade or lower grades, time consuming to search but doable, doubtful that ngc retains that info in a compiled data base but obviously it exists on a one coin cert number at a time basis......
  3. lets see...(1) 1933 $20 SG worth more than (117,448,888) 20 Franc french roosters.....yep much ado bout nothing.....i think id go with the 1933 SG.....
  4. maybe maybe not but try to convince the potential buyer of that.....also the number of pcgs coins verse the number of ngc coins with cac stickers is based solely on how many of each r submitted n how many of each meet the criteria, if ur point is that more pcgs coins meet the criteria than ngc coins then thats an arguable point...my personal experience is that more pcgs coins dont meet the cac criteria, i almost without exception cross over all my US coin purchases to ngc before submitting to cac....one additional thing to consider, virtually all of the major auction houses have their higher l
  5. this topic discussed several times....there is no federal law against making jewelry out of US coins.....moot point....
  6. thoreson numismatics in turlock has good reviews ...no personal experience
  7. im beginning to see the light, smelling the roses n not quite ready to drink the kool-aid....it seems like only yesterday that certain members of our esteemed congress were blaming the methane problems on the cows, the receding ice caps n rising oceans on coal n wood burning stoves in appalachia, the forest fires in calf on gasoline car drivers in texas, fla, ohio n various other non-blue states....n here all along it seems the problems were actually an over accumulation of bullc***p in various govt buildings, over population in non-ice cities, escape of energy at the bureau of printing from
  8. except at coin auctions n then its everyman/woman for him/herself....
  9. hoghead, u can disregard the above...hes babbling on again...
  10. maybe....but i dont consider those buyers collectors in the true sense of the term, they r simply investors n speculators...personally dont think they truly add anything of value to the hobby, of course they supply the fodder that keeps the business aspect of numismatics running....guess it all comes down to why the individual is buying the coins in the first place....
  11. yeppers.....many , many diff reasons to buy coins n equally many, many diff reasons to certify/grade them....authenication, concensus grading, historical documentation, registry inclusion, security, uniformity of display n many more...none of which have anything to do with selling price....totally agree with ur assessment bout "eye appeal" or the beauty of certain coins, afterall some r miniature works of art or mini sculptures....i.e. some of the italian issues of emanuelle III easily rival our own mercury dimes, liberty walking halves, liberty standing quarters, double eagle saints in their
  12. hoghead....its a 45,000 year cycle, if u live long enuf u will be able to hear the glaciers creaking by there in ole kaintuck, by then the liberals will be passing laws to mandate everyone has to burn so many gallons of petroleum products per day n u will have to increase ur carbon footprint by 1% per year, that is if there are any liberals left, if not perhaps we can commission a commemorative half dollar on their passing....
  13. the selling price or monetary value of a coin isnt the only or most likely reason for having a coin certified/graded....most coins are not purchased in the first place based on their selling price....