DWLange

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About DWLange

  • Boards Title
    NGC Research Director

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    coincollectingboards.com
  • Occupation
    Research Director, NGC
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    Florida

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  1. The upper coin is a Small Date and the lower one a Large Date.
  2. That's a good observation, and such a note has been added to the VP page for Ike Dollars.
  3. It seems sharp enough to get 5FS at the least. There's even a possibility of 6FS.
  4. FDR's head has been shrinking since 1981 to improve die life. Having mottoes and legends close to the rim produced rapid die erosion.
  5. There was a sizable run of thick 1941(P) cents, and this was observed at the time. A Mint State coin would have some added value, but that one is worn and corroded.
  6. That is just strike doubling, aka machine doubling. It's interesting but has no added value.
  7. It appears that the planchet split sometime post striking.
  8. NCS can probably remove that spot, but the value of the coin may not be worth the cost. It seems to be lightly circulated.
  9. If you do submit it to NGC you will need to check the Mint Error box to have it examined for that.
  10. The Type 1 and Type 2 designations are added automatically as part of the grading process. The VarietyPlus page for Eisenhower Dollars specifies No Fee for these: https://www.ngccoin.com/variety-plus/united-states/dollars/eisenhower-dollars-1971-1978/
  11. The flattening visible suggests that this was done outside the mint and is not a genuine error coin.
  12. If you're referring to the lighter images directly below the date, those are simply areas that were "protected" from toning by the raised date. This is commonly seen around most peripheral elements on naturally toned coins.
  13. Yes, it's a Texas penny. This gimmick is usually performed with a nickel, particularly Buffalo Nickels, and it's done by placing an ordinary coin between strips of leather and compressing it within a vise.
  14. DWLange

    1977 Pacman

    Looks like a normal cent that suffered circulation damage.