CaptBrian

Member
  • Content Count

    182
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Personal Information

  • Homepage
    www.exonumiaandmore.com
  • Occupation
    Retired collector
  • Hobbies
    Numismatics,Travel,Photog, Foreign Languages, Investing & Economics...Astronomy, Horology,
  • Location
    Florida

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Trying to add pictures. Site is fighting me. Will keep trying.
  2. At a recent coin show, not long ago, I purchased 6 ancient Greek coins, 1 fairly old Japanese and 1 Spanish treasure coin. I don't usually dive into a stack of unknowns unless I know a little bit about what I am doing as my stash got out of control, lapping up coins like a hungry cat on a dish of cream. So, with not the irrational exuberance I used to be under, I have been shedding more common coins and looking to be the only one holding a certain item. So, after asking a coupla dealers what they were worth, I went ahead and bought a bag of unknowns. Right off the bat I sold one for about what I had in the whole stash, so figuring I was onto something, I had the rest of them graded and was quite happy with the results. Got back coins from early as the 5th century BC and I am very excited about 'branching out' as it were. I find that in ancient Greece, there were thousands (2000+) polis's [city states] and each one made its own money/coins/currency. That being said, delving into their history, dates (which are not on the coins) and pedigree (where and when they are from) can be a daunting task. Just going on line and putting in what you think may lead you to your coin, is a fool's errand, unless you have unlimited time and even as a retired fellow, there are 'other things'. So, I had NGC do the legwork, and now I'm taking it from there. I have seen that NGC doesn't cooperate a lot as there are no census figures, actual dates, prices and so on. And with that being said, they don't even recognize the coin beyond their description, so to put one a set, much less the registry, one must begin jumping through hoops. So, be sure you are on track you want to be on. I am going to pursue this avenue as I believe it will lead me down an unknown [to me] history lesson of the 1st magnitude. I am going to attempt to put up pictures of my Greek Treasures, but if not here, perhaps you could go to my set registry and see them there. Anyway, happy collections to all.
  3. Ancient Greek and Greek Islands. With all the new electronic aids, more and more coins are being discovered. With our great expense in finding, having graded and so on with these extremely ancient coins from our history, its a shame for them on to be recognized or given points. A coin's a coin, but one from the 5th century BC (or any coin for that matter.) That we invest in and collect, should be able to be recognized by both the registry and included in the points, pricing, and population. With the computers and knowledge NGC has, why not be on the cutting edge of history. And there is no clear way to identify our treasures without help Please include Greek and Greek Island coins.
  4. Best of luck in your retirement. It took me a long time to get used to it. I would say between 7 to 9 seconds. I did many things during my pre-retirement time, and one thing I did was start collecting early. It's fun, and likely there are coin clubs very near you. I have 3 closeby and that makes it fun. I noticed you don't have a 1907 St. G, High relief, wire rim. It's the belle of my ball. Good luck and have fun Capt Brian
  5. Canadian border guards stop coin returns. A friend of ours in Canada needs our help. Every time he sends a coin for grading from Canada to Sarasota, the border guards give him so much grief in proving the coin he is receiving back is the one he sent. It is creating so much trouble, he no longer sends coins for verification. I think this should be clarified and there must be a method so that this friend of ours can send coins to NGC without problem. Does anyone know what do to? Capt. Brian To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.