Just Bob

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  1. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Hoghead515 in Anybody ever see “Rainbow Toning” like this?   
    That's a Martha Stewart dollar. "Place in a preheated oven. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour."
  2. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from EdG_Ohio in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    The previous post was about Lorenzo Batson, who was the brother of this week's subject: Randolph Batson. 
    In 1883, the two brothers built a store in Hillsdale, Mississippi, to serve the workers who were building the new roadbed for the Southern Railway. As they prospered, they began buying tracts of virgin timber. In 1893, the partnership was dissolved, and L.B moved to Millard (see previous post.) Randolph remained in Hillsdale and continued to purchase timberland, eventually owning 100,000 acres in Mississippi, and another 20,000 in Florida. In 1910, he established the Southern Lumber and Timber Company in Hillsdale, a token of which is shown in the very first post in this thread. That mill burned in 1922. In 1924, he joined with N.P. and W.H Hatten to purchase the sawmill of  the Ingram-Day Lumber Company, and with it, the sawmill town of Lyman, MS. At full capacity, the Batson & Hatten mill produced 200,000 board feet of yellow pine lumber per day, and employed 500 hands. (The town of Lyman still exists today. It is located just north of Gulfport, on Highway 49.)
    "Ran" Batson was an influential figure in southern Mississippi, and was instrumental in replanting the forests after all of the virgin timber had been cut. At the time of his death, he owned 14,000 acres which had been replanted in pines, and stocked with deer and other wildlife, along with other pieces of property throughout south Mississippi.
    The octagonal lumber company tokens are known in denominations of $.05, $.25, and $1; The round mercantile tokens are known in these denominations, plus a one cent token. No ten cent tokens are known for either.
     










  3. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Fenntucky Mike in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    The previous post was about Lorenzo Batson, who was the brother of this week's subject: Randolph Batson. 
    In 1883, the two brothers built a store in Hillsdale, Mississippi, to serve the workers who were building the new roadbed for the Southern Railway. As they prospered, they began buying tracts of virgin timber. In 1893, the partnership was dissolved, and L.B moved to Millard (see previous post.) Randolph remained in Hillsdale and continued to purchase timberland, eventually owning 100,000 acres in Mississippi, and another 20,000 in Florida. In 1910, he established the Southern Lumber and Timber Company in Hillsdale, a token of which is shown in the very first post in this thread. That mill burned in 1922. In 1924, he joined with N.P. and W.H Hatten to purchase the sawmill of  the Ingram-Day Lumber Company, and with it, the sawmill town of Lyman, MS. At full capacity, the Batson & Hatten mill produced 200,000 board feet of yellow pine lumber per day, and employed 500 hands. (The town of Lyman still exists today. It is located just north of Gulfport, on Highway 49.)
    "Ran" Batson was an influential figure in southern Mississippi, and was instrumental in replanting the forests after all of the virgin timber had been cut. At the time of his death, he owned 14,000 acres which had been replanted in pines, and stocked with deer and other wildlife, along with other pieces of property throughout south Mississippi.
    The octagonal lumber company tokens are known in denominations of $.05, $.25, and $1; The round mercantile tokens are known in these denominations, plus a one cent token. No ten cent tokens are known for either.
     










  4. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Quintus Arrius in Train wreck/1978 :) thanks all   
    They are not fake, because they are not there. What you are seeing is exactly what you want to see - extra mint marks. But, they are not real. They are just marks, hits, surface irregularities, stains, or some other anomaly that, in your mind, looks like an "S."
    I am going to try to explain this, and maybe I can do a good enough job so that you will understand what I am trying to convey. If I fail, well, at least I can say I tried.
     
    You have deleted most of your posts and pictures, so I am going on memory and the posts of others, but I think you have stated that you believe that your coin has multiple "S" mint marks of various styles on it, but they have been flattened by a second striking. You stated several other things about the coin, but I will just address this one issue.
    In order for your theory to be correct, several things would have had to happen. First an employee in the Philadelphia die making shop would have to get his hands on a punch that had not been used in 33 years, and use it to punch the die several times. ( I can't recall how many of that style you said you had found on your coin.) Then he would have had to find at least one more, or possibly several more punches, with different style letters (depending on how many more styles you see), and use them to punch more letters into the die - at least 15-20 - since you said you saw, I believe, a total of 25 (or more) "S" marks. ( While we are right here, let me address my remark about using a mint mark punch from the future. You said that the letter under the "D" was from the 1979 die, and since the drawing by Woods did not look like the Type One mint mark - the "blob" that was used from '74 to '79 - I took it to mean the Type Two, which was not used until later in 1979. Still, it was a poor attempt at humor, at your expense. Sorry.)
    Now, back to the explanation: After punching numerous "S" marks into the die, the mint shop employee would have to take the die to someone in the coining  room, to strike the cent, or install the dies in the press himself, and do the striking himself. Once the dies were in place, he would have to feed a planchet, or multiple planchets, if more than one of these coins exist, into the hopper, to be struck. Once the coin with multiple mint marks was struck, it would have to be taken out and set aside. (Actually, it would be caught as it comes out of the chute, not removed from the press by hand.) The obverse die would have to be removed, and another die with a "D" mint mark installed in its place, in precisely the same position as the first die. ( I suppose the die  with the "S" mintmarks could have been resurfaced and reused, but in order to remove all of those marks, enough metal would have to be ground away to remove a lot of detail - something that is not present on your coin. So, we can assume that a second obverse die was used.) Next the coin would have to be placed back into the press in the exact same position as it had been placed earlier. If it or the new die were off by even a thousandth of an inch, or less, the obverse, reverse, or both would show doubling of the devices and lettering. The coin would then have to be struck a second time, and possibly more times, flattening all of the "S" marks, and leaving the "D".
    This is the only way that I can think of that your coin, as you imagine it, could have been produced, and I am not even sure that it is possible to place a single coin in the presses that were in use in 1978. With the Schuler presses in use since 2002, which strike coins horizontally, at the rate of 720 per minute - that is 12 per second -  it would be impossible to place a single coin in the coining chamber in the precise position it had been earlier. I honestly don't know what presses were in use in 1978, but I know that coins were fed into the coining chamber by metal fingers, and not by hand, so I seriously doubt it would have been possible to place a coin in the chamber by hand with any kind of precision, much less  with microscopic precision.
    This does not even take into account the fact that mint records would have to be falsified, in order to account for the missing die, which would have to have been destroyed after being intentionally defaced by the mint worker. (Dies are not just thrown around haphazardly. Each one has to be accounted for.) Nor does it take into account the amount of time that the worker would need - alone with mint machinery - to pull off this feat.
    I hope this sheds some light on the minting process, and on one of the reasons why your coin can not have multiple mint marks all over it. 
     
     
    Edit: I forgot to mention that the die would have had to go through the hardening process after punching all of those mint marks, requiring even more time.
  5. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Sharann in Train wreck/1978 :) thanks all   
    Oh, well.  I tried.
  6. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Sharann in Train wreck/1978 :) thanks all   
    They are not fake, because they are not there. What you are seeing is exactly what you want to see - extra mint marks. But, they are not real. They are just marks, hits, surface irregularities, stains, or some other anomaly that, in your mind, looks like an "S."
    I am going to try to explain this, and maybe I can do a good enough job so that you will understand what I am trying to convey. If I fail, well, at least I can say I tried.
     
    You have deleted most of your posts and pictures, so I am going on memory and the posts of others, but I think you have stated that you believe that your coin has multiple "S" mint marks of various styles on it, but they have been flattened by a second striking. You stated several other things about the coin, but I will just address this one issue.
    In order for your theory to be correct, several things would have had to happen. First an employee in the Philadelphia die making shop would have to get his hands on a punch that had not been used in 33 years, and use it to punch the die several times. ( I can't recall how many of that style you said you had found on your coin.) Then he would have had to find at least one more, or possibly several more punches, with different style letters (depending on how many more styles you see), and use them to punch more letters into the die - at least 15-20 - since you said you saw, I believe, a total of 25 (or more) "S" marks. ( While we are right here, let me address my remark about using a mint mark punch from the future. You said that the letter under the "D" was from the 1979 die, and since the drawing by Woods did not look like the Type One mint mark - the "blob" that was used from '74 to '79 - I took it to mean the Type Two, which was not used until later in 1979. Still, it was a poor attempt at humor, at your expense. Sorry.)
    Now, back to the explanation: After punching numerous "S" marks into the die, the mint shop employee would have to take the die to someone in the coining  room, to strike the cent, or install the dies in the press himself, and do the striking himself. Once the dies were in place, he would have to feed a planchet, or multiple planchets, if more than one of these coins exist, into the hopper, to be struck. Once the coin with multiple mint marks was struck, it would have to be taken out and set aside. (Actually, it would be caught as it comes out of the chute, not removed from the press by hand.) The obverse die would have to be removed, and another die with a "D" mint mark installed in its place, in precisely the same position as the first die. ( I suppose the die  with the "S" mintmarks could have been resurfaced and reused, but in order to remove all of those marks, enough metal would have to be ground away to remove a lot of detail - something that is not present on your coin. So, we can assume that a second obverse die was used.) Next the coin would have to be placed back into the press in the exact same position as it had been placed earlier. If it or the new die were off by even a thousandth of an inch, or less, the obverse, reverse, or both would show doubling of the devices and lettering. The coin would then have to be struck a second time, and possibly more times, flattening all of the "S" marks, and leaving the "D".
    This is the only way that I can think of that your coin, as you imagine it, could have been produced, and I am not even sure that it is possible to place a single coin in the presses that were in use in 1978. With the Schuler presses in use since 2002, which strike coins horizontally, at the rate of 720 per minute - that is 12 per second -  it would be impossible to place a single coin in the coining chamber in the precise position it had been earlier. I honestly don't know what presses were in use in 1978, but I know that coins were fed into the coining chamber by metal fingers, and not by hand, so I seriously doubt it would have been possible to place a coin in the chamber by hand with any kind of precision, much less  with microscopic precision.
    This does not even take into account the fact that mint records would have to be falsified, in order to account for the missing die, which would have to have been destroyed after being intentionally defaced by the mint worker. (Dies are not just thrown around haphazardly. Each one has to be accounted for.) Nor does it take into account the amount of time that the worker would need - alone with mint machinery - to pull off this feat.
    I hope this sheds some light on the minting process, and on one of the reasons why your coin can not have multiple mint marks all over it. 
     
     
    Edit: I forgot to mention that the die would have had to go through the hardening process after punching all of those mint marks, requiring even more time.
  7. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Sharann in Train wreck/1978 :) thanks all   
    You still don't have this figured out, do you? There are no extra mint marks on your coin. Nothing has been flattened out. Nothing has been faked. If you would seriously study the minting process, you would see this plainly.
  8. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Ragulkpm in Conservation suggestions needed   
    UPDATE
     
    After almost 4 months in olive oil, I removed the token and dipped it in acetone, which left a ghastly white film all over it. I scrubbed it repeatedly with Q-tips soaked in acetone, and picked at the green spots with a toothpick. ( I don't recommend this procedure for uncirculated or proof coins!! ) Then I gave it light coating of olive oil, and blotted it with a tissue to remove the excess oil.
     
    Not the results that I had hoped for, but it is better than it was:
     
     
     
     
     

     
     

     
  9. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Hoghead515 in Here are some nickels for Lem E   
    Nice group of Jeffersons. 
  10. Thanks
    Just Bob got a reaction from UrbanDecay4 in Here are some nickels for Lem E   
    Nice group of Jeffersons. 
  11. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from UrbanDecay4 in NEED HELP with this, bogus CC morgan in fake slab??   
    With the terrible pictures, I am betting the seller knows exactly what he/she is selling. I am a cynic in these matters, though.
  12. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Oldhoopster in Colored wheat pennies   
    The '58D looks gold plated or maybe painted gold.
  13. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from J P Mashoke in Conservation   
    Try acetone. Short soak, then a flowing rinse. 
  14. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Hoghead515 in NEED HELP with this, bogus CC morgan in fake slab??   
    With the terrible pictures, I am betting the seller knows exactly what he/she is selling. I am a cynic in these matters, though.
  15. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Lem E in Here are some nickels for Lem E   
    Nice group of Jeffersons. 
  16. Thanks
    Just Bob got a reaction from Hoghead515 in NEED HELP with this, bogus CC morgan in fake slab??   
    Reported both items to Ebay.
    Other than that, I do not know what can be done.
  17. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Woods020 in NEED HELP with this, bogus CC morgan in fake slab??   
    Reported both items to Ebay.
    Other than that, I do not know what can be done.
  18. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Sharann in 2014 P Dime Error Coin?   
    Would you mind explaining how you determined this?
  19. Thanks
    Just Bob got a reaction from Lem E in New images for my registry set   
    Great pics - great coins!
  20. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Hoghead515 in New images for my registry set   
    Great pics - great coins!
  21. Thanks
    Just Bob got a reaction from Woods020 in Opinions on 1838 Capped Bust Reeded Edge “Half Dollar”   
    I waited until I could view the coin on my laptop before answering. My phone pictures weren't good enough for me to feel comfortable offering an opinion.
    It's a pretty coin, to be sure, but I would like it better in a 65 holder. I agree with Mark about the cheek.
    Here's an idea: see if you can get it for 65 money, then send it to NGC for grade review, in hopes of getting it in a 65 holder, then send it to CAC for a green bean. 
  22. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from EdG_Ohio in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    History by Gil Hoffman:
    On March 21, 1900, L. B. Batson and Henry T. McGehee bought the sawmill plant and timber holdings (amounting to 2,880 acres) of R. B. Haney at Millard, Pearl River County. This mill had been built in 1896 and was logged by oxen. For about a year Batson and McGehee operated the Haney mill as a co-partnership under the name Caledonia Lumber Company. The co-partnership was succeeded by the Batson-McGehee Company which was incorporated at Millard on September 19, 1901, by L. B. Batson, of Columbia; Henry T. McGehee, of Millard, and Nathaniel Batson, of Poplarville, with authorized capital stock of $30,000. A new circular sawmill with a cutting capacity of 50,000 feet per day was built at Millard to replace the old Haney mill. In later years this mill was changed to a band type. In the spring of 1902 a standard gauge logging railroad was constructed to log the mill. The mill finally shut down in early 1940.
    Pictured below are two of the companies Shay locomotives, with their trademark side-cylinder engines.
    Batson-McGehee No. 1 sat behind the commissary in Millard after the mill shut down, and was bought by Goodyear Yellow Pine in 1943. It is shown here in Millard about 1940.
    Batson -McGehee No 2 is pictured at the manufacturing yard in Lima, Ohio
    Tokens were issued in denominations of 5 cents through one dollar. All issues are listed as R9 (2 to 3 known.)




  23. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Fenntucky Mike in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    History by Gil Hoffman:
    On March 21, 1900, L. B. Batson and Henry T. McGehee bought the sawmill plant and timber holdings (amounting to 2,880 acres) of R. B. Haney at Millard, Pearl River County. This mill had been built in 1896 and was logged by oxen. For about a year Batson and McGehee operated the Haney mill as a co-partnership under the name Caledonia Lumber Company. The co-partnership was succeeded by the Batson-McGehee Company which was incorporated at Millard on September 19, 1901, by L. B. Batson, of Columbia; Henry T. McGehee, of Millard, and Nathaniel Batson, of Poplarville, with authorized capital stock of $30,000. A new circular sawmill with a cutting capacity of 50,000 feet per day was built at Millard to replace the old Haney mill. In later years this mill was changed to a band type. In the spring of 1902 a standard gauge logging railroad was constructed to log the mill. The mill finally shut down in early 1940.
    Pictured below are two of the companies Shay locomotives, with their trademark side-cylinder engines.
    Batson-McGehee No. 1 sat behind the commissary in Millard after the mill shut down, and was bought by Goodyear Yellow Pine in 1943. It is shown here in Millard about 1940.
    Batson -McGehee No 2 is pictured at the manufacturing yard in Lima, Ohio
    Tokens were issued in denominations of 5 cents through one dollar. All issues are listed as R9 (2 to 3 known.)




  24. Like
    Just Bob got a reaction from Quintus Arrius in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    History by Gil Hoffman:
    On March 21, 1900, L. B. Batson and Henry T. McGehee bought the sawmill plant and timber holdings (amounting to 2,880 acres) of R. B. Haney at Millard, Pearl River County. This mill had been built in 1896 and was logged by oxen. For about a year Batson and McGehee operated the Haney mill as a co-partnership under the name Caledonia Lumber Company. The co-partnership was succeeded by the Batson-McGehee Company which was incorporated at Millard on September 19, 1901, by L. B. Batson, of Columbia; Henry T. McGehee, of Millard, and Nathaniel Batson, of Poplarville, with authorized capital stock of $30,000. A new circular sawmill with a cutting capacity of 50,000 feet per day was built at Millard to replace the old Haney mill. In later years this mill was changed to a band type. In the spring of 1902 a standard gauge logging railroad was constructed to log the mill. The mill finally shut down in early 1940.
    Pictured below are two of the companies Shay locomotives, with their trademark side-cylinder engines.
    Batson-McGehee No. 1 sat behind the commissary in Millard after the mill shut down, and was bought by Goodyear Yellow Pine in 1943. It is shown here in Millard about 1940.
    Batson -McGehee No 2 is pictured at the manufacturing yard in Lima, Ohio
    Tokens were issued in denominations of 5 cents through one dollar. All issues are listed as R9 (2 to 3 known.)




  25. Like
    Just Bob reacted to EdG_Ohio in It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.   
    @Just Bob Interesting, didn't realize there were "coupon" books for such things and I wonder what 500lbs of ice costed back in the day.
    Reminds me of my ration cards in the military overseas.
    ...and perhaps the 1st combination of "Fire and Ice" I've seen in print (coal/ice)....haha