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      Try the new NGC Journals!   03/22/2017

      NGC has launched a new and improved NGC Journals! Available on NGCcoin.com, the new NGC Journals improves upon the popular platform to write blogs and discuss them with other members. The new NGC Journals has an improved design that makes it significantly easier to post and read journals from any device, including smartphones and tablets. Adding images has been made much simpler, and the NGC Journals now give users the ability to create polls and "like" other entries. A popular feature of the old NGC Journals was the ability to open an entry to comments from other users. This feature has been retained and enhanced — users can now comment on the same page as the original Journal entry, creating a seamless experience. Best of all, the same login can be used to post Journals, make comments and access the other features of the NGC website. Old NGC Journals entries will be migrated to the new NGC Journals soon. In the meantime, users can make posts to the new NGC Journals. To get started, create a Journal and make an entry. Unlike the old NGC Journals, you create a single Journal and then add new entries to it. Your Journal can be customized with a cover photo, and you can choose to make it available to all users or only to the users that you select. You can also choose to receive notifications whenever people comment on one of your entries. Scroll below for helpful tips on using the new NGC Journals or go to the new NGC Journals now >   Instructions / Tips To get started, you must first create your Journal and then you can add entries to that Journal. Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

        Click Create a Journal

        Name your journal, add a description, add a photo, and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

        Click Add Journal Entry to add a post to your journal

        Commenting on another user's Journal is easy. After selecting a journal to read, scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the field where you may enter your comments and see the comments others have posted.

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Showing most liked content since 02/25/2017 in all areas

  1. 7 likes
    This baby arrived from John at Coin Rarities Online (CRO): A little history: 50,030 pieces coined at the Philadelphia Mint with 30 pieces reserved for annual assay and 21,000 melted. Designed and modeled by William Marks Simpson. Distributed by the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association, Manteo, NC, D. B. Fearing Chairman. Authorized by Congress on June 24, 1936 and issued to commemorate the three hundred and fiftieth anniversary of Sir Walter Raleigh’s colony on Roanoke Island, North Carolina, known in history as the Lost Colony, and the birth of Virginia Dare, the first child of English parentage to be born on the American continent. Design: Obverse: Bust of Sir Walter Raleigh to left, in ruff and plumed hat; around outer border, at top, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; around lower border, HALF DOLLAR; in inner circle in smaller letters E PLURIBUS UNUM; below, SIR WALTER RALEIGH; in left field 1937; below bust, the artist’s initials, WMS in a monogram. Reverse: Female holding child, representing Eleanor Dare and her daughter Virginia; in background, two sailing ships; right of base a small pine tree; below base the dates 1587-1937; around outer border; THE COLONIZATION OF ROANOKE ISLAND NORTH CAROLINA; in inner circle; THE BIRTH OF VIRGINA DARE; in lower left field, IN GOD WE TRUST. Designed by William Marks Simpson of Baltimore who was director of the Rhinehart School of Sculpture of the Maryland Institute in Baltimore. The coins were distributed by the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association, Manteo, N. C., D. B. Fearing chairman, at one dollar and sixty-five cents each. The Roanoke Island Colony is known in history as the ‘lost colony,’ and is famous as the birthplace of Virginia Dare, the first child of English parentage to be born on the American continent. “Speculation in the field of memorial coins by a few unscrupulous dealers constitutes a problem to organizations fostering historical commemorations,’ declares D. B. Fearing, chairman of the Roanoke Island Historical Association, the group which is actively sponsoring the celebration of the 350th anniversary of the founding of the first English colony at Fort Raleigh. This celebration, which starts on July 4 and ends on September 4, reaches its climax on August 18, the birthday of Virginia Dare, first white child of English parentage born in this country. Sir Walter Raleigh. This portrait was engraved shortly before his last voyage and is the only one published during his lifetime. Courtesy Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, North Carolina, by Charles W. Porter III. National Park Service Historical Handbook Series No. 16, Washington, D. C., 1952 (Revised 1956). This organization has charge of the issuance of the Virginia Dare-Sir Walter Raleigh commemorative half dollar, and it is because of the high price and misrepresentation of some coin dealers in marketing this piece that Mr. Fearing has been aroused to a very real danger to the public. There are several instances which have been reported to us in detail where dealers have declared the issue of this commemorative piece exhausted,’ says Mr. Fearing. ‘That is definitely not so. We have approximately 8,000 of these half dollars available to order through either the Roanoke Island Historical Society or the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association of Manteo. And it is ridiculous to pay a dealer between two and three dollars when these coins may be secured from us at a cost of one dollar and sixty-five cents, fifteen cents of which covers postage, insurance and handling. All proceeds from the sale of these coins will be used in defraying expenses incidental and appropriate to the commemorative festival. So when a dealer claims this issue is exhausted he is talking through his hat. We have enforced the rule that no more than ten coins are available to any one person, and we reserve the right to reject any order that looks to us as if it were a ringer for a dealer. Orders will be filled in the order of their receipt, but only when accompanied by check, postal or express money order.”1 1 The Numismatist, May, 1937. It's a beauty John, much thanks!
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    Well thanks everybody. I just got a GREAT education. I knew it was ultra common. I just for some reason just really like the look of it . It had, what I thought, was a crusty, proof like original surfaces coin I guess I couldn't be more wrong. It was a very inexpensive education, but made realize the importance of sites like this where common interests, experienced professionals, and years of knowledge calminate for the good of each. I will take this opportunity to learn from this. Thanks everybody!
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    Is this thing still on? Took me a while to find the new site.
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    Testing out the forum posting photo option. Here is one of my favorites...
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    Been quiet in here for awhile.
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    The important thing in your statement. ( I just for some reason just really like the look of it.) That is all that counts.
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    Seller's pis. If it holds true, the luster will match my '17.
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    Printer’s proofs of the much anticipated book, “United States Proof Coins 1936-1942,” have been approved and are in the printer’s hands. Thanks to the many collectors and coin dealers who generously provided comments, suggestions and images. Here’s the basic table of contents: Foreword by Q. David Bowers..................................................................................................... 11 Acknowledgements....................................................................................................................... 13 Origin of Modern Proof Coinage.................................................................................................. 15 Manufacturing Proof Coins........................................................................................................... 23 Summary of Proof Coins by Date................................................................................................. 55 Proof Coins by Denomination....................................................................................................... 93 Lincoln Cents................................................................................................................................ 95 Five Cents (Nickels).................................................................................................................... 131 Liberty (“Mercury”) Dimes......................................................................................................... 194 Washington Quarters................................................................................................................... 236 Walking Liberty Half Dollars...................................................................................................... 281 Bibliography................................................................................................................................ 330 The book is 330 pages, full color with hundreds of illustrations. It covers this series in detail down to the number of pieces struck from each die, when dies were pulled from service, delivery dates of coins and quantities sold and returned for destruction. A few brief excerpts have been posted here in the past. Overall, there is surprisingly little duplication of content between the chapters. It has been amazing to go through the data and analysis, and then see results and explanations appear – almost magical. Publication is about a year late due to the cost of color printing. Each book comes with a CD-ROM containing the full text in searchable format. Experience with this approach for the book “From Mine to Mint” demonstrated that it is much more effective, convenient and accessible than a printed index. The digital file may also be transferred to the purchaser’s portable digital device for use away from home or office.
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    Here are the 1934 P and D Washingtons for my A toner Dansco (there was no S mint this year). As mentioned last week, for the 1934 - 1936 stretch of coins, I'm predominantly going for nice AU coins. The P I got raw, and the D I cracked out of a PCGS AU55 slab. The images are by Bob Campbell, and I think he did an excellent job.
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    And why does Heritage Auctions put them in their own category? Before they became a US territory in 1900, the islands of Hawaii had been unified into a kingdom that existed for nearly a century. The Kingdom of Hawaii issued their own coinage, cents in 1847 and a series of silver coins in 1883. The cents were struck by a private firm in Massachusetts and the silver dimes, quarters, halves and dollars were designed by Charles Barber and were produced at the San Francisco Mint. These issues are what I consider to be the coins of Hawaii. Even though Hawaii is now a US state, I think of the coins of Hawaii as "world" coins and would expect to see them in world coin auctions just as I expect to see the coins of Puerto Rico and the coins of the Philippines (although I admit the argument for including the US produced coins of the Philippines in US coin auctions is compelling). However, if you browse a Heritage world coin auction you will typically see the top categories as Ancient coins, World coins and Coins of Hawaii. I don't have an answer for why they have their own category but I imagine it has to do with bidding action. I have gotten used to seeing the coins of Hawaii in their own Heritage category but lately I have observed a trend that I personally do not care for. Within the Coins of Hawaii category, Heritage has started to include bullion "medals", with Hawaiian themes issued by a company calling themselves the Royal Hawaiian Mint. Some of these may have a connection to a State of Hawaii government office but I believe the majority are strictly private issues. Now there's nothing wrong with collecting exonumia; I just find their placement in the same category to be potentially confusing. Now that you know a bit of the history of the official coins of the Kingdom of Hawaii, please understand the difference when you come across a Hawaiian themed medal, regardless how "royal" it seems. Here's my example of the silver dollar (akahi dala). ~jack
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    I took a few years off after college. Been slowly getting into it again. I was looking for a nice Morgan. One that just had that look. I went to 2 shows , looked online. I looked at 100s and nothing. I want to be a lot more pickey this time and finally I saw this one, just thought I would share.
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    A few examples of nice pls or semi-pls that I have sold, these aren't that hard to find:
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    Bryce, I've been collecting US coins on and off for 60+ years. I always defer to the professionals when it comes to authenticity and probable grade/market value. When practical, I want more experienced eyes to look a coin over for me as well, to point out defects that I may have missed. A seasoned professional or collector (or even a more objective observer) can spot things in 10 seconds that you and I might not see for days, months or years. "Problems" will effect the ultimate market value, and, more importantly, our long-term satisfaction with a coin. However, once I've done all that, the only opinion I care about at all is mine. These things are little works of art, to me anyway, which are ultimately matters of taste. I've been married for 50 years and have never asked another human "do you think my wife is pretty?". I know you were just sharing and not asking for advice, but I couldn't help myself. Thanks for sharing.
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    Apparently, I'm in the minority. There look to be noticeable abrasions on Liberty's cheek and some haze or cloudiness on the coin. As it's a very common coin, I think you can do quite a bit better. I hope you take my remarks as honest feedback, rather than an attempt to be negative. What counts, above all, is what YOU think of the coin.
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    I've been collecting wine lately. I've been primarily focusing on Bordeaux. Yes, I enjoy buying it, but I've also been enjoying drinking it (when it is the right age). The highlight of my fledgling collection is a 2001 Chateau D'Yquem, ex-chateau.
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    As many of you know, I collect space memorabilia, particularly pieces from the 1957 - 1975 time frame (launch of Sputnik to end of Apollo era). My original collecting goal was to collect at least one flown item from every Mercury, Gemini and Apollo (MGA) mission. There were 27 missions in total, 6, 10 and 11 respectively, with another 4 post Apollo flights using Apollo equipment; Skylabs 1 - 3, and Apollo-Soyuz. Along the way, I've branched out into trying to collect at least one signature from all the astronauts on the assorted MGA flights, as well as the very earliest Soviet space missions (Vostok). I've also picked up a certain amount of Skylab material, as well as Space Shuttle material. One of the neatest aspects of the whole process is that I've met and had the chance to talk with 12 of the 24 men who went to the Moon including 6 of the 12 who walked on the Moon. The centerpiece of my collection is the Flight Plan for Apollo 12, in essence the log for the second manned Moon landing.
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    Hobby people tend to be hobby people. Here's one of mine:
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    Yes, I understand this. Hobby's I suppose are sort of like genre, using music as a analogy. We all collect different "things" so each hobby shares a language that is identifiable among collectors in that particular "genre." rrantique knows what I said, but I should share a bit more with this particular vein of collectibles so all are on the same wave length. Apologize for previous terms mumu. I'll post a few pics with description concerning Indian Artifacts! Never thought I'd do this on a coin forum- but here goes! This projectile in center is a piece I found about 15 years ago. It's a Paleo piece known as a Folsom type, noted for it's discovery at a paleolithic site in Folsom, New Mexico. The Paleolithic hunters of North America are believed to have crossed the land bridge between Alaska and Russia some 14,000-15,000 years BC. Paleolithic peoples were nomadic hunters- they followed the meat. The projectile was either used as a knife, or, as a projectile in conjunction with the atl-atl, a spear throwing device used to fell big game. Such as the Mastodon. This relic is known as the 3/4 grooved axe. It wasn't used to chop down trees, but used perhaps for girdling trees, "burn down tree." I believe it was more of a utilitarian tool to bust open the brisket of a deer, elk, or, other large game for easier consumption in the process of cleaning game. This particular relic is middle-archaic, roughly 3,000-4,000 BC. The next item was one of spiritual qualities, and of relaxation. This is a pipe, made out of green banded slate. This was a late archaic item- about 3,000 years BC. This particular piece is known as an atl-atl weight. It was on the spear throwing device, and believed used as a counterbalance. The atl-atl was used before the bow and arrow came into use with North American indigenous people. It is a middle archaic piece, and is roughly 4,000 BC. Lastly, to bring up to "historic" times. A gun flint. This was an item that was traded to indigenous peoples as the influence of European technology took hold, and shed light on our proud native inhabitants of nearly 16,000-17,000 years. There's always a better way- perhaps not the "best" way, but a means... All items are personal finds throughout Northwest Ohio. There's many relics that are waiting to be found. The story in stone is yet another chapter of our pre-history / history. Rich
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    With respect to the 67+ star coin - I would check for other dates of similar rarity and populations, to see what they have sold for. I would also consider what other dates of similar populations and rarity have sold for in the MS68 grade. Because, for example, I might ask myself "Would I rather have this exquisite 67+ for the same amount of money that an ordinary looking 68 would cost?" And sometimes the answer will be "yes".
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    And what is the new purchaser cracks it out and send it to PCGS again trying to get a + but instead it comes back as a straight MS-64. would you still agree with PCGS? We all know of coins that have been resubmitted multiple times that came back at different grades, and even sometimes coming back straight graded and other times as details. Grading is subjective and their is no "Right" grade and you can never guarantee the coin will come back graded the same way twice (at least for crackouts)
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    JD--- Regarding: My question(s) … Master Engraver George T. Morgan and Anthony de Francisci made a sample(s) (specimens) of the original 1921 Peace Dollar prior to the imaging of the Satin(s) or the Proof(s) which were presented to the various dignitaries. I understand that they were under a time constraint where as, Mr. Morgan had to step in to expedite the entire process. But, I truly can’t see a perfectionist like Mr. Morgan, sculpting a master with a time constraint, not wanting to take a chance of damage to these precious dies, without finding some kind of remnant planchet, maybe even some scrap soft metal there in the mint, in order to make a sample, in order to see if the sculpturing and grinding(s) were perfect. Comments: First, you should understand that although George Morgan was a very skilled die engraver and designer, he was not the “perfectionist” some allege. During his tenure as Engraver there are multiple overdate dies for which he, as Department Superintendent, was responsible. He did not have a working knowledge the Janvier reducing machine – this work was done by Harry Blythe, a diesinker in the Engraving Department. His hands-on work was almost entirely limited to cleanup of reductions and date changes on Annual Master Dies. As for “grinding,” it’s not clear what you mean. Master dies, hubs and working dies were not “ground" with anything. The steel shanks were cut down to size before final hardening and tempering on a rotary lathe. For the Peace dollar of 1921, de Francisci had about 10 days to come up with preliminary and revised models for the coin. After approval by the Secretary of the Treasury, Jim Fraser made casts in New York and these were sent to the Philadelphia Mint. Blythe made reductions. A press notice was sent out by the Mint Bureau which mentioned the broken sword on the reverse. This caused considerable pubic objection. This is the point at which Morgan showed his skill. Morgan took the reverse reduction and, with de Francisci watching, retouched the reduction to remove the sword, and convert it to the 1921 details seen on the coins. This was all manual work and all done by Morgan; de Francisci only watched and probably offered comments. A master die was made from the altered reduction and this was further retouched to repair areas that were best handled incuse instead of relief. From this point, a master reverse hub was made, and several working dies. Impressions could be made from the soft steel dies to check the work, but the material had to be very pliable – bees wax, wet paper board, possibly a fusible alloy of very low melting point, etc. (We have no examples for the Peace dollar, however.) One or more of the hardened/tempered working dies, paired with an obverse die, were used in a medal press to make samples for approval by the Mint Director and others. Some were left as-is and others were sandblasted in the style of medals – these all are the “proofs” commonly referred to. These pieces were both engineering test samples and design approval samples. The part of the story that is missing – and that was otherwise normal procedure – was manufacture of several thousand test or trial pieces on normal toggle presses. (This was done in 1922 for each of the design variations.) The reason was that President Harding wanted 1921-dated Peace dollars produced ASAP as part of publicity for the Conference on Reduction of Armaments then in progress in Washington. This meant there was no time to run the usual production tests, and even if that had been possible, there was no time to go back and redo all the master dies and hubs before the end of the year. Hoping this was helpful.
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    Looks like you have a couple broken paleo base's in your frame- very rare finds. Would be nice to stumble upon a "5 1/2 Cumberland type fluted to tip on both sides made out of Carter Cave flint in your area...would be worth more than a UNC 1907, High Relief Wire Rim DE!
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    Blue with Textile. You don't see Morgans colored like this very often. Nice Coin Jack.
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    You do know that the coin ended up in a 66 holder, right?
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    Tom, close enough! Here is another close one...
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    Most recent acquisition for my personal collection... 1909 PF66+BN CAC Lincoln Wheat Cent