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  1. 4 points
    This plaque was awarded to United States Proof Coins 1936-1942 at the NLG Bash last Thursday evening. I want to thank all the collectors and dealers who generously contributed photos, information and suggestions. It was your assistance that helped make this an award-winning project. This award is as much yours as mine.
  2. 4 points
    leeg

    Post Your Most Recent Acquisition

    Some great coins all! 66+ from GC (Highland Collection.)
  3. 3 points
    MarkFeld

    is CAC overrated?

    CAC is "worth it" to some people, but not others. And it's "worth it" for some coins, but not others. if you're an expert grader, perhaps CAC isn't worth it to you, as a buyer. But if you plan to sell someday, keep in mind that CAC might be worth it to some of your potential buyers. No one made JA God, other than perhaps a few individuals, in order to set up straw-man arguments from time to time. JA has earned his stellar (even if merely mortal) reputation, including among his peers, based on more than 30 years of experience.
  4. 2 points
    ldhair

    ICG GRADING VS NGC AND PCGS

    Old thread but I'll still reply. I have found great coins in all kinds of different slabs. I don't care about the plastic as long as I get to see the coin before I'm stuck with it. I'll worry about the plastic when I go to sell it. With that said, I have a great deal of respect for Skip and Randy at ICG.
  5. 2 points
    BillJones

    is CAC overrated?

    Sadly I've come to the conclusion that there are a significant number of collectors who are not that concerned about the grading issue. I learned my lessons in the days before there were third party graders. Sure, some dealers would sell a coin like that 1852 gold dollar as a "Choice Uncirculated" (term for MS-63 in the old days) piece, but when the same or different dealers were buying it, that "L" played a huge role in what they were willing to pay for it. You could easily lose half or more of what you paid on a coin like that. Those practices were one of the main reasons why third party grading services gained a major foothold in the U.S. coin market. Now it seems we are coming full circle, and that lose grading is becoming once again acceptable. It will be interesting to see how long this lasts, if these examples become more prevalent.
  6. 2 points
    First, I apologize for this report being posted so late. I had lots of family things to take care of right after the show. Also, my hubby finally retired just before I left for Denver (I'm very glad he's home, but his only instruction from me is "do not bug me so I can get my work done"! - let's see how long that lasts!) So the first thing we decided to do was to get away to our place in Lake Havasu when I returned from Denver and I had to get things ready. The good thing about Arizona is that the gas prices are quite low compared to California which helps take a little sting out of the 113 degree temperatures! Can't wait to take the boat out on the lake! But first, I told myself I have to get this report posted before I can relax, so I'm preparing this show report while on "vacation." Unfortunately, I left my notes at home, including some of the names of the folks who stopped by my table. I'll do my best and will update this report when I get back home next week. So now on to the show report! Wow! What a show this was! Even though it was long, it went by very quickly. I went into this ANA Denver WFM show with only medium to low expectations since the last show I did in Denver a few years ago was not very good at all. So I'm not sure whether it was my excellent table location, all the new Pretty Pennies I had recently acquired, or just that collectors were in the mood to buy, but this Denver ANA was one of the best shows I've EVER had! I seemed to be busy from the opening of the show to later in the afternoon. Sometimes I'll judge how well a show is doing (at least for me) by how many times I leave my table, and I can tell you that I barely left my table until late in the afternoon each day! So I left Orange County on the afternoon of Sunday so I would have the opportunity to hunt for more Pretty Pennies at the preshow on Monday. I always arrive at the airport two hours early just in case there is a glitch going through security, but this time I sailed through in about 15 minutes, even with a bag check. So I had some time to kill and there just happened to be a wine tasting bar directly across from my gate so, well, you know.... I thought I'd start this trip off right! This Faust wine was amazing, and I look forward to finding it and getting some for home. Soon it was time to board my flight. I settled into my seat, and felt so very happy to be fortunate to be doing what I love and heading to another coin show! It didn't seem to take too long before we were landing in beautiful Denver (actually only n easy 2-hour flight)! I checked into the host hotel at the Sheridan, unpacked, and fell right to sleep. I woke up to this beautiful view of downtown Denver from my hotel room. I wet over to the convention center so I could drop my bags off at security until set up day. Well, I was quite surprised at the distance the security room was from the front of the convention center, and all on carpet no less (which makes pulling heavy bags much more difficult)! The security room was at the complete opposite side of the convention center. Hauling two very heavy bags that far on carpet, in thin air compared to sea level air, well let's just say, it took my breath away and made me perspire more than just a little (remember, girls don't sweat, we perspire)! Even those folks who were obviously quite fit had a hard time with the extra thin air. It does take some getting used to. Then I headed over to the PNG preshow, walked around to all the dealers, starting with some of my favorites. I'm guessing there were a total of about 40-50 dealers set up at the preshow. I was pleased to be able to find quite a few more Pretty Pennies which helped to fill some holes in my inventory. After the preshow, I stopped by the auction lot viewing. Then I walked around the convention center and took a few photos (however, Kenny Snow's photos of the bear were better than mine so I used his!). It's a very large and attractive convention center. Most unusual, there is this huge bear right in front of the convention center which is a very popular photo subject! Then I met up with Rick Snow and Greg Hannigan for a late lunch at the Yard House. Then we headed off to the PNG dinner. Since I didn't have a table at the PNG preshow where each table holder gets two tickets to the dinner, luckily one of my other PNG dealer friends had an extra ticket. The PNG dinner is held at a wonderfully nice restaurant and they usually serve very delicious wine at dinner. They also honor some of the great folks who work behind the scenes to help make numismatics better for all of us, especially those helping to curtail counterfeiters and coin thieves. So I was very pleased and honored to be able to attend. This dinner was held at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, and boy, was it beautiful inside. The menu for dinner I always feel honored to be in the presence of David Bowers, he definitely an amazing man, still going strong and such a wonderful personality and wealth of knowledge. And John and Nancy Wilson are right up there with folks who work hard to make numismatics a better place for all of us. Their tireless efforts often go unsung, but they give their time, service, and knowledge freely and with great delight to countless numismatic organizations. My fun little bff Nina, holding "court" as usual! She is definitely the life of any party!!! More numismatic greats! Chris McCawley (and his lovely wife, Julian Leidman, Jimmy Hayes and David Sundman Part of my posse! Rick Snow, his son Kenny, and Gary Knaus Ghost Pines puts out some very good wine! The next morning was set up day. There was quite a crowd of dealers waiting to get into the show. I set my booth up pretty quickly, and soon vest pocket dealers were coming up to my table showing me more Pretty Pennies. I was happy to pick up several more pieces for inventory, including these Pretty Pennies (since I'm a little late getting this report out, Todd had already finished preparing my new purchase photos!): I took an opportunity to see the ANA's exhibit and they had some amazing pieces on display! My buddy Dino Koromvokis showed me this beautiful Flying Eagle pattern piece he had for sale: So the folks at CoinWeek stopped by and asked to interview me LIVE on Facebook about a "Cool Coin" in my case. Of course, I said "Sure!" I chose this 25 planchet piece from the 1960's that got jammed together in a feeder shoot and sort of welded together. Pieces like this don't usually make it out of the mint, but for some reason, this one did and it's the only piece known to have made it out and not melted. So I took a photo of them photo-interviewing me! Also, here's a link to the actual video piece on Facebook in case you're interested: https://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1103900460 They also did a video interview with me about the 1943 cent, and its popularity among collectors, its history, etc. I think this piece will air at a later time. After the show ended on Tuesday, we went to the very famous Buckhorn Exchange restaurant. It's Colorado's oldest restaurant having been established in 1893 by Henry "Shorty Scout" Zeitz, a big game hunter and the youngest member of Buffalo Bill's band of scouts. So for those of you who aren't a fan of big game hunting, you may want to skip over these next set of photos. My dad was an avid hunter and provided us with meat that sustained our family of seven throughout each year. My dad still has a large buck head mounted on the wall of his house. However, even though I grew up learning how to use firearms from an early age, I personally was never a hunter. This is a beautifully carved piece hanging also on the wall about two feet in diameter. It looked just like the reposse/push out pennies I collect so I just had to take a photo of it. Someone in our party even commented that we just can't escape coins even at a restaurant like this! While we were waiting for dinner, we tried some of the various beers they had. I really enjoyed this cherry beer, it was very refreshing. The menu was printed on the other side of this "newspaper." As you can imagine, they served all kinds of game, including buffalo and alligator! Since I grew up on venison and never was a huge fan, I enjoyed a delicious tenderloin! The next day Wednesday was the first full day the public was let in. This is me and Rick's son, Kenny, headed up to the bourse floor. James Houghtaling was the first to stop by and say hi! Followed shortly by John/Claychaser, his son (forgive me, I forgot his name), and my buddy Buck I was very busy most of the day and was pleased to have sold quite a few pennies. Things finally slowed down around 3pm, so I opened one of the bottles of wine I had brought with me. I really enjoyed this Sonoma Zinfandel, and so did several other folks who stopped by for a taste! I have always been impressed with how hard ANACS works and how many shows they attend, including taking submissions at many of the smaller club shows throughout the country. Since ANACS is based in Colorado, they had a strong presence at the show. Here's a great group shot of all the hardworking ANACS folks. From left to right: John Roberts (Director of Attribution Services), my BFF Cindi Snow (West Coast/Pacific Northwest Rep), Christian Merlo (Texas Rep), Paul DeFelice (Vice President), Brett Williams (President & CEO), Bill Arnold (Denver Rep), Quent Hansen (Midwest Rep), and Matt Adams (Southeast Rep). ANACS also held a wonderful reception at Ruth's Chris Steakhouse. It was a really nice event, and everyone really enjoyed it. Here are pics of various people who attended the reception. Rick, Neal, Kenny, me, and Cindi Cindi and me Raeleen Endo and Ian Russell (GreatCollections), and Paul DeFelice (ANACS) James Sego Dennis, Rick and Neal After the reception, Rick and I headed over to the Black Hawk casino which is located in the mountains in what looks like it used to be an old mining town. It was raining on and off and the sun shining through the clouds along the way was really beautiful. I found my favorite Buffalo Stampede penny slot machine but sadly had no luck this time. Thursday I had to get up very early in order to attend my Dealer Relations Committee meeting at 8am. We had a very productive meeting. I had distributed all the comments posted on the message boards, so we discussed them, and several other important issues involving the ANA shows. We made several recommendations to the Board so now it's up to them to decide what can and can't be implemented. Just so you know, the ANA commits to show venues about 4 years ahead of time, so some things can't be changed until a few years down the road. We also discussed having an ANA rep respond to various questions you all have so that you will have a better understanding of what goes into putting on these shows, some of the specific criteria required in choosing a location as well as the costs. Any way, like I said, I feel it was a productive meeting and hopefully you'll be hearing more details soon. Thursday was another very busy day for me, yay! I bought a few more pieces and sold a lot more! I didn't even get out on the bourse floor once until later in the afternoon! I had even forgot that Rick Harrison of Pawn Stars was making an appearance at the Modern Coin Mart booth, so I missed taking his photo there, but the MCM photographers graciously let me use one of their photos! Also on display at the show was America's First Coin! David McCarthy (Kagin's) did exhaustive research on this piece to determine that it was the first coin ever minted by the U.S. government in 1783, the precursor to our U.S dollar issued 10 years later. (fyi, These two photos are not mine.) Then Thursday afternoon was the "Shave Miles" event where Miles Standish was holding a fundraiser to help support his Child and Family Healthcare nonprofit. Rick Harrison and the Broncos Cheerleaders made an appearance, with Rick being the first one to shave Mile's hair. Also, Dave Halperin (Heritage) had his hair shaved off first! On Thursday afternoon, I opened the other bottle of wine I had brought with me, a very tasty Carr cab. It didn't last long! After the show was over on Thursday, we went to an absolutely wonderful restaurant in Little Italy called Luca. It was recommended to us and they indeed did not disappoint! We started off with this awesome 2014 Rosso Toscano Followed by this 2006 Il Fauno Wow, both were amazing wines, especially for the value! These are some of the entrees we had. Mine was the brazed shortribs with creamy polenta and grilled brussell sprouts. The sortribs practically melted in your mouth, they were soooo yummy! If you're even in Denver, I highly recommend Luca! Friday morning I had to be at the convention center early again for my Women In Numismatics board meeting, followed by our general meeting. We had Steve Dippolito give a fascinating presentation on "A Century of Empresses, Russia in the 18th Century," which focuses on Russian Imperial coins. Back at my table, business began anew. I was so pleased with how well this show was going for me, particularly since coin shows and sales slow down during summer! Then this gentleman walked up to my table and handed me a Lincoln cent and asked me what I thought. I immediately could tell it was a fake and looked up at the gentleman. He had a big grin on his face, so I looked at his badge and it was Dan Carr! He showed me this beautiful portrait of Lincoln and said the coin was carved using that portrait as a model. This portrait had several differences than the design of our Lincoln cent. Very cool! Next up was my Fly-In Club (for Flying Eagle and Indian cent enthusiasts) meeting where Rick discussed Flying Eagle pattern cents and passed around several amazing specimens. I sat next to Mark (from Colorado) at the meeting, who recently volunteered to be the Colorado State Rep for the Fly-In Club (I'm the club's District Rep Manager, as well as the California State Rep). District Reps help promote the Fly-In Club at any club meetings and shows they attend around the country. On my way back to my booth, I passed by this scene where a car is on its side. I am guessing they were getting ready to set up for a car show at the convention center? After the show was the ANA's Awards banquet and silent auction fundraiser. In addition to the exhibit and other awards, this year they were "changing the guard" and swearing in the new board members. They had some interesting and fun items up for auction and bidding was quite active! This is the item I won at the auction! Then it was time for dinner and the banquet. There are always some neat souvenirs left at each table! Me and my table buddies! Barbara and Neal, and Rick and me The room was filled with lots of numismatic luminaries! In addition to the exhibit awards, the ANA gave out several service awards. This year I was extremely honored to be given the Elvira Clain-Stefanelli award which honors "women who have made significant contributions to numismatics. These contributions, whether in research, leadership or mentor-ship, must have made a lasting impact on the numismatic community and demonstrated a lifelong commitment to the betterment of numismatics." While I knew I was to receive this award, I seriously didn't know how special it was until that evening. When I went up to receive the award, several people cheered, whistled, and hooted and I became very emotional, so much so that I wasn't able to say much when asked to give a few remarks. I know, me being speechless was amazing in and of itself, but it was true. So let me now just say that I am so thankful and grateful to the ANA and everyone who supports me throughout my adventures in numismatics. I hope I can be an example to young women numismatists that they can do anything they put their minds and passions to, and not let anything or anyone stand in their way! Then the new board was sworn in. Even though I know Gary Adkins will work hard and be a great ANA leader, I very much enjoyed working with Jeff Garrett on the Dealer Relations Committee. He was very involved, had some great ideas, and worked hard to make the ANA a better organization for all of us. It is this type of hard work and dedication that any organization needs and the ANA was very fortunate to have Jeff. Thank you Jeff, for your service to the ANA and numismatics! Saturday morning I finally had some time time to view the exhibits. As always, there were several amazing exhibits, but what I really noticed and was pleased to see this year was that there were several "woman" themed exhibits. Then I visited the U.S. Mint booth. I came across these young numismatists gathered together going through their treasure trivia loot! Then it was time for our WIN Summer Seminar scholarship raffle drawing. The days before the drawing, one of our board members, Dreama went around to every table on the bourse floor and was able to sell over $800 in tickets. Together with that, we had sold over $1,800 in raffle tickets. Fifty percent of the sales of these tickets goes towards our Summer Seminar scholarship, while the other 50% gets split between two winners. These are photos of Dreama giving the winners their winnings! This is David Lange (NGC) along with his well-deserved award for Numismatist of the Year! Brent Pearson is an talented hobo nickle engraver and I ran into his table at the show. The Denver show was first show. He knows I collect hobo pennies and gave me this pretty piece that he had carved: The PCGS folks! Always-happy-Paul at ANACS! My awesome booth neighbors, Northern Nevada Coin! It's always a joy to see Lance! My friend Oded Paz, the Reposse/Pop Out Expert! LAs photo of me and my lil ol medal and placque! It's time to pack up and ship out! Nina and I had flights close together so we took an Uber together to the airport. When she lived in Orange County, we used to meet up at the airports quite often, so it was fun to spend some time together catching up on our families, etc. When we got to the airport, we weren't surprised that our bags needed extra screening which is pretty usual for us. However, what we didn't expect was a very rude and nasty TSA agent who had no patience and clearly wanted to be an alpha dog. And this is why we get to the airport at least TWO hours before our flights! It started when alpha dog picked up one of my bags and began walking to the private screen room. However, I asked her to stop because my other bag was still at the xray machine and i needed to keep my eyes on both bags at all times. That's when she got the "attitude." When the other TSA agent grabbed my bag and Nina's bag, we proceeded to the room. However alpha dog wanted us to enter the room first, but I said I would follow her (again, wanted to keep my eyes on my bags). But she insisted on being behind us, so I instead walked NEXT to her, but had to enter the room immediately ahead of her. Then she began going through my raw coins very roughly with several of them falling out and her tossing them just anywhere back on the tray. Then while the alpha dog was going through Nina's PCGS boxes, pulling each coin out one at a time, she couldn't get the lid off one of the boxes. She tossed it on the table and demanded to Nina to "open it." No please or would you mind, no politeness whatsoever. So I said "PLEASE?" but of course she just scowled and ignored me, and continue meticulously pulling out each and every coin. While she was going meticulously trough my SIX doublerow boxes of certified coins, I eventually began to video tape her while Nina snapped some pictures, but then alpha dog went outside and got her superior who told me I was not allowed to video tape his agents. I said I just wanted to make sure nothing went missing because the coins were falling out of the trays. He told me "his agents don't steal!" I just shook my head. He forced me to delete the video right in front of him. Then alpha dog kept leaving the door wide open every time she went out to do the swipe test, and we kept closing it for security purposes. She complained to her superior about that too and he told us to keep it cracked open, which we had never heard of before. However, when alpha came back in I ignored that command and again shut the door behind her (small victory). When we were finally finished, we saw several of our dealer friends waiting to go into that room for private screening. We warned each one of them to be careful about alpha dog, that she had a really bad attitude and would draw out the whole process as long as she could. After that experience, Nina and I really needed a drink! We found a nice bar that had great Cadillac margaritas and chips and salsa! We also took some selphies and Nina added those funny filters to some of our pics. That was a hoot! While I greatly enjoyed this Denver show, it was a long week and I was worn out and so glad to be headed home! Bye bye beautiful Denver! Hello Orange County! So glad to be home with my hubby and adorable soft fluffy kitty Penny! So as I mentioned, this Denver show was a huge success for me. I thank the ANA for working so hard and doing such a good job putting on this show. All of your staff and volunteers did a great job and everything seemed to run very smoothly. Next up: Long Beach, then Santa Clara!
  7. 2 points
    jtryka

    Post Your Most Recent Acquisition

    Well, she ain't the prettiest girl at the dance but she's mine!
  8. 2 points
    BillJones

    outrageous auction fees

    These guys are fast making me reconsider how I will sell my collection. The higher the buyers' fee, the lower the hammer prices. I know they are willing pay more than 100% of the hammer price to consignors to get the plum collections, but it's not improving the market for what they are selling. Let's hope that the smaller and smarter auction firms will eat the dinosaur auction house's lunch. The time has come for market forces to alter the dinosaur's ways or force the dinosairs into extinction.
  9. 2 points
    PocketArt

    Eisenhower 1976-D PL

    I can't believe it...I found another 1976-D Type 1 PL. This one I'll roll the dice and send out to NGC. I also picked up a Gem BU 1987-P Jefferson Nickel PL. I'll try to get better photo's of that and post soon.
  10. 2 points
    David W. Lange received his Numismatist of the Year award at the ANA's annual convention banquet Friday evening in Denver. To help recognize Mr. Lange's accomplishments, NGC provided each attendee with a special sample 2017-D half dollar.
  11. 2 points
    Six Mile Rick

    The 100 Year Test

    I LOVE my modern U.S. collection!!! It is absolutely fun to build the sets and I also enjoy helping others as they get into the modern quest. Who cares what they will be worth in 100 years??? I will be dead and they will survive, somewhere in my family or world. I just know that I am enjoying putting the sets together while I am here, alive , and having a great time with MOST of U-guys!!
  12. 2 points
    jtryka

    Post Your Most Recent Acquisition

    I picked these two up at the post office today.
  13. 2 points
    Lucky One

    Time to eliminate the phony "Struck At" labels.

    what is so screwed up about the whole situation is that there is really no difference between the first strikes off the first sets (yes, plural, as in many) of dies. I don't know how many tokens (yes, these are not coins in any honest sense and will never circulate officially) they can get out of a die before stresses appear or details disappear but my guess is they go through several hundred dies. If this is true, then there are 'early strikes' from EVERY die, making the whole concept faulty. If I got a late strike from a die used during the 'early strikes' period it would be far inferior to the first ingots off any die after that striking period, so IF I was presented with two coins- one lacking full detail and with less than outstanding luster and surfaces from a 'first strike' and the other a fully struck piece with perfect luster and surfaces from a brand new set of dies used after the 'first strike' period, my obvious choice would be the nicer coin. Why are people fooled into buying a label instead of the coin that they are supposedly collecting? P.T. Barnum said it right- there's a sucker born every moment. What Barnum never saw coming was supercorp players who could fool large numbers of people into believing a common turd was a gem to be cherished. Shame on all the fools who bought into and helped them perpetuate the scam...
  14. 1 point
    toneddollars

    Unique GSA graded

    It looks like from the NGC pop reports that the one and only 1893-CC hard pack has been found and graded MS-63+
  15. 1 point
    Insider

    is CAC overrated?

    Yeah, you are correct. It's said that each of us has two things and one of them is an opinion. Mr. Jones (who claims to have seen the coin) and I are just guessing. What you and I may agree on is the professionals didn't see what you don't see either. ROTFL! Have fun and good luck in your collecting pursuits!
  16. 1 point
    LINCOLNMAN

    is CAC overrated?

    Loose grading makes it easier for collectors to acquire "tough" coins while kidding themselves that they have maintained minimum quality standards. I've victimized myself in this regard on a few occasions. In each case I've had to pay the piper, or expect to.
  17. 1 point
    coinman_23885

    is CAC overrated?

    My understanding is that a "C" quality coin is low end but appropriately graded for the grade. Using this definition, this is not a "C" coin but is an "F" quality coin and should not sticker at any grade if it has graffiti on it.
  18. 1 point
    Afterword

    is CAC overrated?

    I agree completely, but it also demonstrates how the problem is created by the collector - not CAC. If CAC claimed to be perfect in its assessment of coins that would be a different matter altogether, but I do not believe they have made any such claim. Like the TPGs, the best they can do is give their opinion based on their experience and hope that their inherent fallibility as members of the human race does not produce too many errors. Anyone who claims CAC is infallible is either amazingly gullible or trying to light your fuse. I believe, in most cases, it is the latter. I, as well, advise collectors not to depend on CAC blindly, but I do not condemn CAC for their lack of perfection, being that they are only humans.
  19. 1 point
    I phrased that poorly. What I meant to convey was that among the more advanced collectors most of us are older. There were many millions of young new collectors when I was a boy just as there are now. Of course newbies don't attend coin shows just like as has always been the case. My point was chiefly that the young people might be less prepared to own "all" the coins than they were in the '50's and '60's since the aggregate value of all coins is many multiples of the aggregate value of the coins in those days. Inflation has increased ten fold but the value of all coins has increased fifty fold. Let's just say it's been a good 70 years! The number of boomers who collect today is pretty high since we are collecting later in life and we are such an enormous demographic. But in few areas is this demographic more profound than in coin collecting whether seen in terms of numbers or in terms of the total value of the coins we own compared to the total value of coins owned by other age groups in this country. Like everything numismatics requires a lifetime to acquire significant expertise. Older people will always have some advantages and prominence over younger people in most walks of life. They'll always have had more time to have acquired, knowledge, wisdom, wealth, and coins. They might always be more visible in coin collecting though there was a time when this current crop of oldsters were quite visible as beginners because there were so many of us.
  20. 1 point
    Mr.Mcknowitall

    is CAC overrated?

    I have never read a comment that states CAC protects a person from buying problem coins, or read that a person blindly depends on on the opinion of CAC, or that a person claimed CAC always get it right. I certainly understand your position via CAC as it has been stated on many occasions. You have a level of judgement of quality that those of us that are not as seasoned can appreciate and maybe even envy a little. You have from time to time posted observations of less than stellar opinion grading by TPGs and 4PGs. Awareness is a good thing, and good for the hobby. But (there is always a "But"), the anecdotes that are posted to illustrate a TPG or 4PG swing and miss should never be interpreted by the reader as a lack of credibility (or ability) on the part of the TPGs and 4PGs. Each and every coin that is opined by a person with your credential and ability as a swing and a miss can and should be brought to the attention of the TPG and/or 4PG for re-evaluation and correction, if indeed correction is needed. The TPG and 4PG would much rather have this occur, because it increases trust and credibility and benefits the hobby and all who partake in numismatics. The TPGs and 4PGs are not a business model that wants to have unhappy customers because of interpretation of human error now and then as blatant swings and misses that cause dramatic statements of opinion that many read and perceive as a continuing event of failure on the part of the TPG/4PG. As an aside, when you, as a very respected, seasoned and experienced numismatist, observe the human errors of judgement, do you contact the TPG/4PG and discuss the issue, so such pieces can be corrected, if necessary, for the benefit of all in the hobby?
  21. 1 point
    Dude. Anytime you bring a '94 to the party, she's just about the prettiest girl. I mean, I'd take her home.
  22. 1 point
    Another fun post, thanks for taking the time and sharing.
  23. 1 point
    Mr.Mcknowitall

    outrageous auction fees

    My opinion is that when collecting merged with investing, creating the collectorvestor, the growth of auction houses and condition experts (TPG) was assured. The collecting venue does not matter...art, autos, comics, numismatics. We are human. We want to increase our economic position. The purist collector (not concerned with the economic aspect at all), is a very very rare individual.
  24. 1 point
    bsshog40

    Raw 1936 Buffalo Arrived Today

    Looks nice!
  25. 1 point
    Nice coins!
  26. 1 point
    RWB

    is CAC overrated?

    It appears more a matter of many not understanding what CAC does and why they exist, than over- or underrating.
  27. 1 point
    coinman_23885

    is CAC overrated?

    From a selling perspective, CAC is worth the submission fees on coins worth more than $500. Anything I can do to increase liquidity and value is worth the trivial submission fee to me. From a buying perspective, the CAC sticker garners zero premium for me. If the coin is PQ, it is worth a premium regardless of sticker. I have also seen a fair number of coins stickered by CAC that I hate and would not buy at the stickered grade. IMHO CAC is far too forgiving of scratches and ugly toning on certain series, especially antebellum coins. That doesn't mean I don't respect them, only that my personal standards are stricter in some regards.
  28. 1 point
    DWLange

    Unique GSA graded

    Mechanical Error that has been fixed.
  29. 1 point
    I asked the local librarian in Vermont what they had on Hetty Green on original documents, they had this folder. Interesting how the estate was distributed that gave Col. Green a lot of buying power for his numismatic collection. His sister got the lion's share after he died and everything ended up distributed to good causes. http://i.imgur.com/ZyH7cFw.jpg http://i.imgur.com/o7SmnWA.jpg http://i.imgur.com/kG3APZL.jpg http://i.imgur.com/XLjGkDe.jpg http://i.imgur.com/mYUa4pH.jpg http://i.imgur.com/qwSCycX.jpg http://i.imgur.com/UpGRjOK.jpg http://i.imgur.com/vdXf6Kq.jpg http://i.imgur.com/Y2zGBb6.jpg http://i.imgur.com/GQsegUT.jpg http://i.imgur.com/oRn61Yk.jpg http://i.imgur.com/oMGF6oG.jpg
  30. 1 point
    jtryka

    225th enhanced coin set?.

    Glad to hear you all got one!
  31. 1 point
    disme

    1792 half disme – new documents found

    For those interested in the 1792 half disme coinage it is perhaps worth mentioning that new documents from 1792 have recently been found and will be published in the August 15 issue of Numismatic News. These documents show, for the first time, the President’s role in this coinage and the legal basis by which the coins were struck. The documents also raise the question of just when the Mint was founded; the year 1792 is now a little less certain.
  32. 1 point
    What a wonderful article! Thank you for sharing it with us. It provides with a much better understanding of Washington's role in the coin, which was not as hands off as some have led us to believe. The mintage comments that the July coinage might have been as much as 1,700 to 1,800 pieces leaves some questions as to who supplied the silver. Did Jefferson commit more than $75 of his $100 withdrawal from the Bank of the United States, or did someone else provide the extra funds? Could the silver used in the coins have been prepared for coinage at the time that Jefferson provided the silver? In a mintage operation it is impossible to submit $75 and get $75 worth of half dismes in return. There is always a small amount of metal lost in the coinage process and there is always "web scrap" left over from the planchet punching operation. Also who might have supplied the silver for the 200 to 300 pieces that were probably made at the mint in the fall of 1792? The die state evidence seems to point to the existence that coinage. We will probably never know the full story about the 1792 half dismes, but the additional information and speculations about what did happen make these coins even more intriguing.
  33. 1 point
    Here is the link to the Numismatic News article containing the ground-breaking 1792 half disme research by R.W. Julian. 1792 half disme
  34. 1 point
    The only toning I have ever seen on a MS steel cent is a faint blueish cast. The zinc tends to oxidize too rapidly for a thin film toning to occur.
  35. 1 point
    Sorry to disappoint, but there is absolutely nothing natural or genuine about that toning. That is artificial - some sort of chemical was applied. If you like it, then good for you. Just understand that is definitely artificial toning.
  36. 1 point
    some of the reprocessed and copper plated tone up well
  37. 1 point
    RWB

    1792 half disme – new documents found

    Advance notice of articles like this is always helpful. It gives everyone the opportunity to be alert to new information.
  38. 1 point
    BillJones

    Please help me find a coin

    This is not good advice. You can waste a lot money on grading fees and postage by doing that. PR-70 coins are a combination of truly high grade pieces and luck. The dealers who sell that sort of thing send in many coins to get the cream. A collector who sends in only a few coins, who gets the PR-70 they want, has had an experience a kin to buying a $500 scratch ticket. Buy the coin in the holder you want. Don't depend on getting what you want from raw coins or coins in "third world" certification holders.
  39. 1 point
    Here is a walking liberty half that got more https://coins.ha.com/itm/errors/1945-s-50c-walking-liberty-half-dollar-double-struck-second-strike-55-off-center-ms63-pcgs/a/1191-3797.s?ic4=GalleryView-ShortDescription-071515
  40. 1 point
    bstrauss3

    Please help me find a coin

    There is this site called eBay, lots of people sell lots of stuff there... https://www.ebay.com/b/State-Quarters-1999-2008/41093?Certification=NGC&Year=2002&Strike%20Type=Proof&Grade=PR%2070&rt=nc&Mint%20Location=San%20Francisco
  41. 1 point
    Chris B

    I got another one

    I like the slab pages. I use them for my favorite stuff. The rest go in storage boxes. Congrats on the 70.
  42. 1 point
    CBC

    Time to eliminate the phony "Struck At" labels.

    Amen to that. I refuse to play that game.
  43. 1 point
    World Colonial

    Grading thoughts

    Why limit it to the 1900's? Under the reasoning you apply, it should apply to coins from any period regardless of location. To use the criteria you are describing would render this grade meaningless. Of course, since only common coins ever receive a 70 and there are hundreds, thousands, or even millions of others which look identical or essentially so, it is a contrived significance anyway. To a limited extent, I believe the TPG (NGC and PCGS) already do what you prefer, but just with all other grades. I've seen many coins with incomplete, weak or terrible strikes whose grades don't make any sense. This past weekend, I noticed that NGC has now graded a handful of Guatemala pillar 1/2, one, two and four reales (1754-1771) in AU or MS, If I ever see the MS-64 or MS-65, it still won't surprise me if the details are substantially missing, as occurs with practically all of the few decent but lower grade coins I have ever seen. But yes, it's probably the best this mint could produce at the time.
  44. 1 point
    Here is my most recent purchase. It is a MS 62 - 1806A France 2 Francs that I picked up for my Napoleon Type Set. It has an incredible surface which the pictures just don't do it justice. The observe picture does a slightly better job of showing the different colors that dance across the surface depending on the way the light is hitting it. Thanks for looking.
  45. 1 point
    Here are 2 of my unchopped M23 yen. I bought the first one from Yahoo Japan , so I'm not sure about the authenticity. The second one is from auction-net (one of the Japanese auction site) , but unfortunately , it's been cleaned in the past ( I believe).
  46. 1 point
    As far as the color goes, I love this coin best among all of my collection. Bought it raw, took 4 times to get into a holder ( BB 3 times for questionable color) The actual coin is a bit darker and has more purple than the image suggests. It's a Japanese 2 sen copper from 1875
  47. 1 point
    Mohawk

    cleaning zinc coins

    Hey JKK, You know what? If I can dig up some more zinc rusted coins cheaply to experiment, I'll try lemon juice as well! Sadly, the only one I have around with white on it currently is a 1944-A German 5 Reichspfennig with a couple small spots of white. That coin is too valuable for me to experiment with, but I'll see what I can find at a good price. If I find some cheapies to experiment with, I'll let you know how it goes! Good Luck! ~Tom
  48. 1 point
    Hi Augustus, You are so correct. It has taken me decades to amass the coins I have but the last few years, especially with the RCM and Perth Mint, the number of coin varieties they are spitting out is ridiculous. I think I have a preety good collection but when I went through and calculated what it would take to just fill the balance of the Canadian coins I still need, it's over 600. When you look at $100-$200 per coin, that's between $60-$120K. I hope I win the lotto soon because I just can't keep up. On the other side of that argument is the fact that I love the hobby and enjoy it as such. Good luck with filling your sets! -Dan Hughes
  49. 1 point
    I just looked into your custom set and that's one sweet 8 reales. I never realized that Agustín de Iturbide had pork-chop sideburns -- all the other coins with his image that I've seen were either too worn or weakly struck to bring out that detail. ~jack
  50. 1 point
    NGC has my loyalty, as well, but it would have been impossible for me to assemble the sets that I have put together with a mutually exclusive company such as 'only-PCGS' or 'only-NGC'. That is why I really love NGC and their Registry Set, since BOTH are allowed in the US sets categories. If they ever make it so only NGC coins are allowed in all sets. I will be done with all registries and that is the same reason why I don't compete ATS. I would never crack everything out and resubmit it to have just one or the other TPGS---that's nuts. All of my NGC coins are among my best and I could never replace them----they are every bit as good if not better than PCGS. My collection wouldn't be the same without them but I need my PCGS coins, too, b/c not everything is readily available in NGC plastic. The only thing that I could see myself doing is getting involved in a registry set that is owned and operated by a unbiased, objective, third party, numismatically-related company, such as Heritage for example, that would allow both NGC AND PCGS slabs to compete. Those are the only two companies that I care for and would not want any other TPGs included such as ICG or ANACS.