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  1. 6 points
    leeg

    Post your most recent acquisition: US

    I think I see some color on the obverse. Heritage Images.
  2. 5 points
    Coin Cave

    For the love of copper

    Added another 1852 large cent to my collection. N-11 I bought the coin for the strike. It may have been cleaned, but, the strike is outstanding. A little brown coin envelope should fix up that nasty old cleaning.
  3. 5 points
    ldhair

    Follow the lead picture post.

  4. 5 points
  5. 5 points
    robec1347

    For the love of copper

  6. 4 points
    From a recent show......
  7. 4 points
    JKK

    So!

    If that type of PMD was common (and it is; as I mentioned, I have seen several), that would also explain your second coin. Evidently at some point pennies were indented, probably by percussion but perhaps by enormous pressure, sometimes once and sometimes repeatedly, with a thin pie-piece-shaped instrument or bit making an impression resembling Akkadian cuneiform. That is a supposition (the explanation) based on observable fact (the type of indentation). That is as far as I can see the facts going. The most unexplained aspect is why this was done, who benefited from it. Sometimes the benefit is simple amusement (a kid got hold of it). Perhaps, also, in some industrial application people found that the perfect way to shim two surfaces apart was to force a penny in there. Laugh if you want, but I used to work in a planing mill with equipment that dated back to the 1940s. To get the last board out, one had to pull a cord and hold it, waiting for a certain steel rod to rise up past a chalk mark on a steel plate, and then take a quick jump. I can assure you that we McGuyvered anything we needed to. How much more so would that have been in the early 1900s with less precise machining? And since you're receptive to help, please for the love of God begin using periods and ending sentences. Doesn't matter in short paras, but the longer ones are excruciating. It will help us help you. This is not a punctuation police issue, but a fundamental readability issue for people trying to understand what you type. It will show respect, and frankly, we have shown enough respect for what most of us consider a very absurd idea that I think we have earned that courtesy of you. It will help you and us.
  8. 4 points
    Coinbuf

    For the love of copper

  9. 3 points
    I personally think you have an awesome outlook on this whole thing Coin Cave. It sounds like you collect your coins first and because you love the coins, not necessarily because of the holder they're in and you're on the Registry because it's fun for you. This is a hobby and it's supposed to be fun! Sadly, I think a lot of people, particularly Competitive Registry collectors, seem to forget that. They get so caught up in plastic collecting, Registry points and competition that they forget that they collect coins. For me, the Registry was about one thing.....proving to myself that I could win a major award. And I did. Twice. But, if I'm to be completely honest, Registry collecting lost its luster quickly once I had won that first award. I quickly found myself wondering why I was continuing to do it.....I had reached my goal and that was good enough for me. So I stopped and started chasing my ancients, which I love and which have so much to learn and so much variety that they will sustain me for years. The second big win was for a set I had completed years ago aside from one big non-competitive rarity. I know a lot of people would just keep trying to win again and again, but that's not the kind of guy I am. I reached my goal and I was content with that. The second award was an unexpected bonus. I'd rather step aside gracefully and contentedly and allow others who haven't won have their shot at achieving that big goal for themselves while I move on to another chapter. The best thing about the whole NGC thing for me (even better than the awards actually) was becoming a part of this community, and I've learned that I can be an active member here without Registry collecting. You guys are my virtual coin club because the clubs around me.....well, they're not the greatest. But I don't feel a void because I have you guys
  10. 3 points
    Just Bob

    1969

    1969
  11. 3 points
    Just another simple service I offer. I'm now imagining Donna Douglas throwing the director over her shoulder and heading for the see-ment pond. "Mista DAH-recta, you never told me the critters done messed up the water! Now Ah'm gonna whoop you an' tote you to the see-ment pond, an' if you mess it up lahk ma critters, Ah'm a-gonna throw ya raht back in! An'Ah ain't sorry, neether!" I watched the episode recently and you may assume that I scrutinized it with obsessive care to see if there were a blooper dook sighting, but did not notice any.
  12. 3 points
    Mohawk

    Have a Cigar! Show your Gold Coins!

    Actually, I do have a gold coin to share! I forgot about one of the US coins I have that I do enjoy:
  13. 3 points
    Coinbuf

    Have a Cigar! Show your Gold Coins!

    Some day I need to get a better pic of this and some of my other gold coins.
  14. 3 points
    Those couches are the WORST to sleep on. Itchy fabric. Smelling like sweat. Retaining heat. After you cash in all your big finds upgrade that mofo pronto. I'd suggest something non-fabric like vinyl, leather, etc... Will always feel nice & cool and no need to Febreze it errryday.
  15. 3 points
    Mohawk

    Genuine 1969s Doubled die obverse

    You're absolutely right Mokie.....that one is probably one from the first thousand or so he found, sent to ANACS before he found NGC and began to grace us and reward us with his presence, his high level of numismatic skill and his coherent, rewarding content. The rest of the pile, along with his equally large pile of 1958 Doubled Dies, will undoubtedly be in NGC holders. Maybe NGC will even give him a special label for his hoard because he is the Dalai Lama of DDOs.
  16. 3 points
    Mokiechan

    Genuine 1969s Doubled die obverse

    But we forget, He is a DDO Master and has found numerous 69S DDOs while they pass under our unknowing loupes. So the one in the ANACS holder was an earlier find, the one on its way to NGC will prove his zen mastery. (:
  17. 3 points
    Unfortunately I think a lot of people have become plastic collectors. (And I don't mean people like myself that actually collect the slabs for what they are.)
  18. 3 points
    Conder101

    Genuine 1969s Doubled die obverse

    Of course a simple look at the toning pattern on the ANACS piece shows it is NOT the same coin as the one he originally posted.
  19. 3 points
    Conder101

    What would be the error of this coin

    That's NOT die deterioration. Looks more like a double strike, first strike in collar and second broadstruck.
  20. 3 points
    some of these threads crack me up, lol!
  21. 3 points
    NGC offered both NGC and PCGS coins in their Registry for a long time. PCGS never has. I thought it inevitable that NGC would eventually make this change. My only set's are in the NGC Registry.
  22. 3 points
    Dukemnm

    Genuine 1969s Doubled die obverse

    @Collector3745 Do post NGC results when you get the coin back. I am curious by nature and I am now curious. I have sent in some 1972 coins that I thought were DD only to come back machine doubling. of course, they don't put that in the slab, so now I have 1972s that are worth 1 cent, slapped. LOL
  23. 3 points
    RWB

    "Branch Mint Proof" Morgan dollars

    This was posted on another board by writer Kevin Flynn. I though it might be of interest to members here. What defines a proof coin? I received a Heritage catalogue of the Platinum Night and Signature Auctions, April 24-28, 2013 in Chicago. This included the 1913 Walton Liberty Nickel. On the 5th and 6th pages, several Morgan Dollars are listed with photographs. This included several coins that are listed as Branch Mint Proofs, including 1879-O Morgan Dollar, PCGS PR64 1883-O Morgan Dollar PCGS PR67 CAC 1884-CC Morgan Dollar NGC PR66 Cameo 1893-CC Morgan Dollar PCGS PR65 By definition, the term ‘proof’ refers to the method of manufacture, and not the condition of the coin. Proof coins are made by the Mint for presentation, souvenir, exhibition, or numismatic purpose. They normally have mirror-like fields, sharp detailed designs, and high squared rims. In the eyes of the collector, proof coins represent the essence of beauty and the attainment of perfection in a coin. The sharp details of the design bring life to the images portrayed. The mirror surfaces create an aura around the figures, and the wire rims create the distinction between perfection and the rest. The working dies to be used for striking proofs are hand-picked for their sharp details, and the dies are then cleaned and polished to create a mirror-like surface. The planchets to be used for proof coins also are cleaned and polished to create mirror-like finishes. Coins are struck in a coining press that can exert greater pressure and the coins are struck at a slower speed to produce sharper details and a wire edge rim. The coins, once struck, are handled by hand so as not to get any contact marks. Coins from Uncirculated Mint Sets also show sharp details in the design. One of the reasons that proof coins show such great detail in the design is that the working obverse and reverse dies are only used to strike about 2,000 to 3,000 coins per die. Normal working dies can be used to strike hundreds of thousands of coins, wearing down the design elements. Sharply struck coins from new dies can have subtly reflective mirror-like fields, but fall short of true proof-like surfaces. Proofs are defined by the process in which the coins are made. If the obverse and reverse dies were not polished, these coins could just be sharply struck specimens from new dies. During this time period (between 1873-1900), the mintages for the business strikes and proof coins are specifically listed in the Annual Report of the Director of this Mint. For these years, proof coins are only listed for the Philadelphia Mint, no proof coins are listed for the Branch Mints. The working dies for the Branch Mints were normally hubbed starting in late October of the previous year they were to be used. All working dies were sent in groups, none were listed as separated out as proof or especially prepared working dies. The Branch Mints did not offer coins for sale or distribution as proofs. There is absolutely no National Archive or Mint records to indicate that these coins were intended to be struck as proof coinage. There is absolutely no Mint records to indicate that proof coinage was authorized for the Branch Mints during this period. As another example, the 24 1894-S Barber were never called proofs by the San Francisco Mint. They are listed as business strikes in the Director of the Mint Report. They do not show wired rims, or mirror-like fields, and also have flaws on several on the design elements. They were not called proofs until an auction decided to call them proofs in the 1940s. This was most likely done in the belief that it would increase their value. There have been some instances, especially when a Branch Mint was opened, that proof coins were sometimes struck, and documented as such. Sometimes the process used in making proofs such as polishing the working die or planchets is used for coins that are not proofs. For example, all of the 1893 Isabella Quarter Dollar commemorative coins were struck on polished planchets, these are not considered proofs. I have seen plenty of Morgan Dollar Branch Mint coinage that have cameo design elements and mirror-like fields, especially those of the Carson City Mint. All of these I have seen to date have correctly been called proof-like. I would challenge the grading services that certified these as proofs to provide evidence that they are proofs, that they were intended by the Mint to be struck as proofs, that they are Mint records that they are proofs, that they were sold or distributed as proofs, and that they were struck as proofs. In my opinion, they are not proofs. Kevin Kevin Flynn
  24. 3 points
    I was anticipating that this Long Beach show, like other June Long Beach shows, would be on the slow side, but I was pleasantly surprised to find overall it was quite a busy show with both abundant coins to buy and very active sales. As usual, I arrived at the loading dock Wednesday morning, unloaded my car at the bottom of the ramp, and me and my booth mate Rich then pushed the loaded cart up the ramp to wait for the noon setup to begin. With two booth helpers, set up went smoothly and quickly, and soon vest pocket dealers were stopping by my table showing me lots of Pretty Pennies. My bff Cindi stopped by to say hi. She had just bought this moose puzzle for her sister. It wasn't long before my good friend Victor and his brother-in-law Clark who just flew in from New Zealand came by my table. He flew to the United States just to pick up some coins, and submit some others to PCGS for show grading. Yes, he is a very passionate numismatist! And they even brought me a nice bottle of Australian wine. We opened that bottle of wine and shared it together - it was very tasty and we all enjoyed it immensely. After the show, we went to our usual Wednesday night spot for dinner, Cafe Piccolos, with my long-time foreign coin dealer friends, Karl and Joanne Stephens, and my dear friend Ron Guth, as well as my boothmate Rich! We brought a few bottles of wine to share and had a really nice evening catching up with each other! I ordered the exact same thing I order every time, the goat cheese chicken and Caesar salad, which was as good as ever! Then we shared the tiramisu for dessert! The next morning I arrived at the show a little early so I could stop by some dealer tables to see if I could fill some want lists. I stopped by to see a dealer who I had bought several pieces of penny exonumia from over the years. We had talked a few shows ago about my capped cent collection and he mentioned that he had quite a collection of original capped cents that he had acquired from a dealer who bought them directly from Louis Werner, the maker of the capped cents. I asked him at that time if he wanted to part with them and he told me he would think about it. Well, he brought the collection to the show and we ended up working out a deal for all of them. The collection included to scarce Joe Louis pieces, as well as several rare Santa Claus pieces in their original Christmas card holders. Also, there are several silver-plated pieces and others with attached bezels to be worn as jewelry. I'm just so thrilled to have add all these pieces to my capped cent collection! In case you're interested in learning more about Capped Cents, here's the article I wrote which appeared in the Numismatist in April: https://reader.exacteditions.com/issues/80630/spread/50 Also included in this collection were two sports-related capped cents that I had never seen before but I thought they were so detailed and interesting that I decided to buy them as well. I'm hoping to learn more about them, what they were made for, etc. They were made in the 1960's so if any of you have more info, please let me know. After I bought the capped cents deal, that dealer's wife came by my table and gave me this cute little mouse holding a penny! When the show opened on Thursday, there seemed to be an endless stream of people coming to the show. For me and most of the dealers I spoke with were pleasantly surprised that the show was very busy most of Thursday. Todd came over to my table to show me this beautiful glass token from the 1892 Columbian Expo that he bought at the show. I have never seen a glass token like this before. He thought it would make an interesting photographic subject, and he was right! After the show on Thursday we headed to our usual Thursday night restaurant - Naple's Ribs! Victor and Clark had heard us talk so much about how good the ribs are that they joined us as well! Friday started out much more slowly than Thursday but soon became steadily busy. I had several regular customers come by and even some YNs like this very adorable young lady! And this cute boy and his mom Also, Dave99b came by and showed me his 1929 1/4 dollar he picked up at the show And John at CN Numismatics and I shared some of my Rombauer Zinfandel at the Central States show, so he was very gracious and gave me a bottle at the show - thank you John! Here are a few of the amazing proofs from the EMS Collection that will be up for sale at the Stack's auction in August! Me and my group are very much creatures of habit because after the show on Friday, we went to our usual Friday night restaurant - King's Fish House which is just behind the convention center on Pine Street and has the most amazing macadamia nut crusted halibut! They also have these silly riddle napkins. We all brought a bottle of wine to share, though we must be slowing down in our old age since we seem to only drink about half of each bottle these days! This is the halibut - it's so yummy that I get it every time, as does half the table! Me and my booth mate, Rich - his wife refers to me as his "show wife"! The rest of our group! Saturday was pretty crowded with lots of families, scouts and other YN's, but it was slow sales-wise, as expected. Me, a little worn out, on our final day of the show! I made my usual rounds with the grading services and they were busy as usual! After picking up their coins, my New Zealand pals needed to head out to the airport for their long trip home. And they even brought me ANOTHER bottle of Australian wine, this time a very nice cab! Let me just say a little something about Victor. I've been working with him for several years now, helping him put together registry sets. Earlier this year his toned set of Indian cents became the all-time finest, and one of his requirements was that every one of them had to be purchased from me! Wow, I was extremely honored. And Victor is such a delight to deal with, always trusting my judgment in the coins I chose, and making it very easy for me to help him. It's truly been an honor and pleasure for me helping Victor with his collections! And I can see why Victor brought Clark with him, he's a wonderful side-kick! Gentlemen.... until next time! So that's about it. Overall, it turned out to be a good show for me, I'd probably give it a B. I realize my experience can be very different from other dealers, but since Long Beach is close to my home, I have a lot of local customers who help make my show even more successful. And as usual, my hubby was waiting for me when I arrived home - I am always grateful that he is there to help me unload all my heavy bags at the end of a show. And then of course there's my sweet Penny who just lays there and watches all the commotion, then goes back to sleep! Next up: The San Diego Coinarama show July 13-14, then the ANA in Rosemont Chicago August 13-17!
  25. 3 points
    robec1347

    For the love of copper

  26. 3 points
  27. 3 points
    ldhair

    Follow the lead picture post.

  28. 3 points
    This thread keeps getting bumped, so my hand is being forced to speak more of my mind once again. I have been an NGC proponent from the very beginning. My best coins are in NGC slabs and they are graded very accurately. I have always bought the coin and not the holder. What I collect is so rare that it requires the resources of both major grading services for me to properly put together a good quality set. I started my registry set in 2005 and have been working on it ever since. I am 97% complete with only two coins left. Five of my last coins that I acquired were after the decision to no longer include PCGS coins, so I could not add them to my set. So instead of 97% complete; I am only 89% complete according to NGC. That is extremely disappointing, even though I know it is not true. I started here long ago and made many friends here on the chat boards. I never even thought about venturing across the street, until years later, as I was more than happy here. I have used NGC grading and conservation services and have found them both to be equal, if not far superior to PCGS, even if the majority of the market makers don't feel this way. I also like the look of the NGC slab better than PCGS's slab. But now, after all these years, I can't complete my set with the best coins from both services. How can you tell me this is a good decision? This has to be hurting NGC's bottom line, because sooo many people have dropped out of participation on the Registries and the chat boards, now, and are angry and more and more are buying PCGS coins instead. That is not conjecture... that is a fact, as I have talked to literally about a hundred collectors who have told me they feel this way. And don't tell me that I can register my coins in the Custom sets. It's not the same. There's no organization, there's no ranking and, unless you are really looking for something specific, it all gets lost in cyberspace and nobody actually sees it. Even if NGC would give me zero points for my newer PCGS coins; I would be happy, because then I could at least complete my set and showcase it here. Please reconsider NGC. You are better than that and I feel it will be a much better financial decision for you. As for CAC...well, they don't bother me, at all, because I know what I'm looking for and I know how to grade, so if I can buy a GOOD non CAC coin for less money, then all the better for me. And, if I do happen to see nicely graded CAC coins; I will pick them up, if they are not priced to the moon. Most of my set was acquired before CAC was even in existence, anyway, so many of my coins would sticker today, if submitted. Regardless of what happens; I will always love NGC and will always be loyal to them and support them. Respectfully submitted, WF
  29. 3 points
    Coinbuf

    For the love of copper

    Working on taking some pics myself, best so far but still a long way off from the pros
  30. 3 points
    MorganMan

    Follow the lead picture post.

  31. 3 points
    leeg

    Post your most recent acquisition: US

    Snagged these two off eBay with my "Best Offer:" Seller stated "Original Box." It isn't, According to Charles Keck, the designer, and Medallic Art Company the Manufaturer. The original box is an "easel type" box. Still cool though.
  32. 3 points
  33. 3 points
    Mohawk

    So!

    This is starting to feel familiar in all the wrong ways......The Travis Hale Story is not a movie I want to see the sequel for.
  34. 3 points
    JKK

    So!

    It's not about levels of numismatic knowledge. Anyone here can be wrong. It's about how you interpret what you see, and how well you can support your conclusion. If you did the research to discover some aspect of the minting process that could leave such marks, and presented evidence, people would consider it. My question was dead serious. I also have IHPs and Lincs with similar PMD marks. If they were actually error coins, I would be ecstatic. But if you do not in fact do that research (or do it, but do not come up with support), and thus cannot convince with evidence, it will make sense to accept the consensus until you are in a position to contest it with better evidence.
  35. 3 points
    Conder101

    So!

    Well it doesn't have the "same" indentation, it has A similar indentation but not the same and not in the same place. You just have a second damaged coin.
  36. 3 points
    CRAWTOMATIC

    So!

    Great input from everybody as usual. To Mason I feel like this would be a casebook example of confirmation bias. You mention you've had the coin on the right for 5-6 years and always hoped you'd find another with the same characteristics. So you find another coin with a similar indentation and automatically presume it's the same cause and now you're proven right. I'd like to point out that the indentation on the left coin is not the same as the coin on the right. On the left, only half of the 'M' is missing. The....ya know, I'm not going to list out all the reasons it's a different mark. But look at them again buddy and trust the opinions here.
  37. 3 points
    ldhair

    For the love of copper

  38. 2 points
    Conder101

    Cupronickel?

    Yes. Standard Catalog of World Coins 37th edition. The catalog only lists the weight for the silver version and it lists it as 28.28 grams. Since the crowns are roughly the same size as an Ike dollar (they are a little larger) I assumed the weight of the copper nickel would be a little more than the weight of a coppernickel Ike which should be around roughly 24 grams. So based on the weight listed in the standard catalog they should be silver. Interesting. The silver version of the coins shown though would be a little less than the weight shown for the cat coin in the link that was provided because the cat is .999 fine and the Aircraft of WWI coins are sterling .925 fine. I find their listed weight for the coppernickel unusually high. For that number to be correct the coin woulld have to be very thick, about 25% thicker than an Ike dollar. The tissue test should be a quick and easy way to determine if they are silver of not. Just put a single layer of facial or toilet tissue over them. It they are silver it will be obvious. If you want put a coppernickel Ike, kennedy half, or even a quarter in with them to see if there is a difference in the color seen through the tissue.
  39. 2 points
    A Hippo raising legitimate concerns about Hippo exploitation on the NGC Collector Forum.
  40. 2 points
    Grabbed this up at the coin show today. A better struck 1935 Buffalo nickel.
  41. 2 points
    You've provided me an excellent opportunity to tell of a little-known instance of authentic hippo muckspreading. On the old 60s sitcom Beverly Hillbillies, Jed and his kinfolks once ended up with a hippopotamus in the see-ment pond (pool). What audiences never realized is that the creature, probably frightened, dropped a number of hippo deuces in the pool, and the crew had to fish them out (and as you may imagine, hippo deuces are not trivial in volume; even worse than our former Labrador retriever). The actors did not learn until later that the pool water was not actually changed after this, so those who ended up in the see-ment pond eventually found out that they had dunked in hippo-*spoon*-tinged water. There was discontent.
  42. 2 points
    wheat'swheats

    For the love of copper

    nice one
  43. 2 points
    Mokiechan

    Genuine 1969s Doubled die obverse

    OKAY, I'll bite, so in 24 hours, you were able to get the cent you initially showed, the badly photographed one, slabbed as a DDO by ANACS when you stated it was On Its Way to NGC? Interesting!
  44. 2 points
    Collector3745

    1972 Doubled die

  45. 2 points
  46. 2 points
    1900 NGC MS61 Gold Half Eagle* Sincerely to Everyone in the Community! NGC has been Such a big Part of My Life! Capone1929!
  47. 2 points
    Timely

    Have a Cigar! Show your Gold Coins!

    New addition!
  48. 2 points
    mumu

    "Branch Mint Proof" Morgan dollars

    That's not even a well struck business example.
  49. 2 points
    Greenstang

    1981D Lincoln cent

    Hess4 Please do not believe anything that R420coins has stated on this posting. You just have to read some of his other posts to know why. There is a saying that is very appropriate here "He knows not of what he speaks".
  50. 2 points
    I've given up on trying to make any sense out of what the US Mint does. That's part of what I love about collecting ancients......it doesn't matter what any of the mints do.....my coins were struck long ago.