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A VISUAL PROOF OF EXISTING VARIETIES FOR FIVE BOLÍVARES 1926 VENEZUELAN COINS.

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FAS_Coins

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A VISUAL PROOF OF EXISTING VARIETIES FOR FIVE BOLÍVARES 1926 VENEZUELAN COINS.

Using Adobe PhotoShop (PS) we will compare 5 bolívares 1926 coins with the objective of proving the existence of several varieties not recognized by the grading companies (NGC; PCGS; ANACS; etc.)

We will explain the method used and then will proceed with our conclusions.

To compare coins we will first align them and then resize them. For alignment we will use the top horizontal line of the shield.

 

image.png.942ad644471591dd9b6b22f4e2fe8c51.png

 

After alignment we will convert all coins to the same size. I will choose 1300 x 1300 pixeles. All coins will be cropped to a square with all borders touching the coin.

 

image.png.0754b20d5ccba97af03820b31de4fbdb.png

 

We will next make a “mask” of the stars and date by overlaying a transparent layer to the coin photo in PS. This “mask” will be used to compare different dates. The example below was made with a 3 pixel white brush, however, for different varieties we will use different colors. We generally use a 1 pixel brush for exactness.

 

image.png.a99073073de870ad52c27deea53cf19a.png

image.png.caa3f99fe814c529f369ad34a6197c80.png

 

“Masks” are quite easy to draw with a mouse using PS, however, If you have a pad and pencil it will be much easier. I use a WACOM ONE pad (about $60) and it works great.

 

In the following images we have created masks for 5 different varieties in 5 different colors.

1 - Orange. Corresponds to NGC 3645265-002 MS 62

2 - Red: Corresponds to NGC 4184415-002 AU 58

3 - Dark green: Corresponds to NGC 2847072-010 AU 55

4 - Light green: Corresponds to NGC 3722337-004 MS 61

5 - Light blue: Corresponds to NGC 2809065-062 AU 50

 

image.thumb.png.2fb9a4ce6f3078421e66c891996a937c.png

 

In the next image we will see all 5 “masks” superimposed.

We can clearly see that the dark green “mask” is narrower than the rest. We will call this dark green “mask” the “NARROW DATE” variety.

 

image.thumb.png.fc957f136786786c8ea5c0c5a248cfd0.png

 

We remove the dark green “mask” and can now see that the red “mask” number “2” is higher than the rest. We will call the red “mask” a “HIGH 2” variety.

 

image.png.3e053d0963c23f8d17ff872bd5948825.png

 

We then remove the red “mask” from the image and observe that the light green “mask” number “19” is wider than the others. We will call the light green “mask” the “19 WIDE” variety.

 

image.thumb.png.9e62a519a8a5bc499adcc0e0b60e046c.png

 

We will now remove the light green “mask” and are left with two colors. The light blue “mask” number “6” is higher and we will call this the “6 High” variety. We are left with the orange “mask” which we will call “6 LOW” variety.

 

image.thumb.png.5cadd91d6d93a2a50cffaf567cc1e517.png

 

Even though we have provided descriptive names to these 5 varieties we believe that the correct method to identify the different varieties is using “masks” which will visually give us a more exact detail of which variety we are looking at.

 

We have searched many 1926 5 bolívares coins but we can not guarantee that more varieties than those mentioned exist.

 

Fernando Aguerrevere Sánchez
F@Aguerrevere.com

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This is interesting.

A couple of questions: How were the dates punched into the hub or die? In other words, was the complete date punched into each die, or into the working hub, or into the master die, etc? Or was it the last two digits, as in earlier US coins? Or, something else?

And, since I have never used Photoshop, this next question may be ignorant, but is there any possibility that cropping, resizing or other manipulation of the image might cause distortion? Obviously, the "high 9" is a known variety, so I am not implying  that the misalignment was caused by the manipulation. I am just wondering exactly how accurate the photos are once the images are all sized the same. If it is completely accurate, this seems like a really good method of comparing like coins.

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55 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

And, since I have never used Photoshop, this next question may be ignorant, but is there any possibility that cropping, resizing or other manipulation of the image might cause distortion? Obviously, the "high 9" is a known variety, so I am not implying  that the misalignment was caused by the manipulation. I am just wondering exactly how accurate the photos are once the images are all sized the same. If it is completely accurate, this seems like a really good method of comparing like coins.

The main challenge to my mind would be getting 2 very consistently made images of the coins and getting them properly rotated and aligned so that any differences you're seeing area actually differences in the coins and not in the image creation / editing process. This is more a camera / image creation issue than a photoshop issue.

It's going to be very difficult to so this with a camera unless you have the camera on a tripod, have the camera on a wireless trigger so you don't touch it at all after you set it up and you lock the focus ring into manual only and you'd want to have things set up with the placement of the coin / slab so that you place both coins in the exact same place, preferably at or near a perfect right angle to the lens of the camera. If you don't do all that just right, with the small size of the features you're looking at, you could easily be seeing distortions and not real differences. You'd probably want to keep the coin just towards the center of the camera / image frame to minimize barrel distortions and other optical distortions that happen in the lens.

Alternatively, you could just scan the coins on a flatbed scanner and hope for the best.

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Hi! I don´t have an answer for the die question. Regarding Photoshop I can assure you that the program creates no distortion when resizing. With regard to the distortion when taking the picture I agree one has to be extremely careful. Up to now I´ve worked with photos obtained from third sources, grading and auction companies. I´ve been stuck in Madrid for 5 months, when I get back home I´ll take photos of my own coins. Regarding the validity of the method, I believe, if you do this with extreme care it is surely better than comparing two coins with a loupe.

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18 hours ago, Revenant said:

The main challenge to my mind would be getting 2 very consistently made images of the coins and getting them properly rotated and aligned so that any differences you're seeing area actually differences in the coins and not in the image creation / editing process. This is more a camera / image creation issue than a photoshop issue.

You can get a pretty good idea if the images are correct because once you compare them everything matches except the dates (variants).

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