My wife is finally impressed

2 2
deposito

308 views

For more than 13 years I have been maintaining a slush fund, making sure I get the mail first, discarding all packaging and most documentation, and immensely discounting the value of the coins I have around.  NGC has helped by serving as an excuse for getting coins in the mail that were "already mine."  My wife has not been hostile to the collection, and has occasionally expressed some interest in a historical figure she has heard of showing up on a coin, but not much.  Ancient coins?  She doesn't really believe it.  When NGC sent back one coin out of a submission ungraded as "questionable genuineness" she said "of course they are going to do that sometimes - so you believe the rest are real."  

About nine years back I started picking up Thai coins since she is from Thailand, and her mom and nephews have shown more interest in these than my wife has.  These really opened up some memories for the mom in law, and surprised my wife and her nephews with how much the value of a baht has deteriorated (like the dollar) since the late 1940's and 1950's.  Whereas a satang (like a cent) is pretty much a throw-away unit of currency in their lifetimes, (a baht is worth about 3.3 US cents, so a satang is worth 0.033 US cents), the mom in law remembers going to the market and most transactions taking place in satangs.  Thai coins, and a few banknotes, have run thin cover for the rest of my collecting.  As I have mentioned in prior entries, almost everyone from Thailand admires a big silver King Chulalongkorn coin.  Except perhaps the most virulent anti-monarchists.

Anyways, I recently picked up a 100 Baht banknote from a 1929 series, issued May 1, 1932, just under two months before the mostly bloodless coup that resulted in King VII abdicating and the institution of a constitution in his place.  It basically looks the same as the 1 Baht note of the same issue, just bigger and bluer. 

328268532_1932100BAHTVF25.jpg.511daec2e76a73ca18701bf86648f634.jpg

I left it on the counter for my wife to look at after dinner and she promised to take a look.  I expected the usual quick glance, "that's nice", and that's it.  But this time we got some emotion and awe-struckedness.  I can't read Thai but obviously she can.  What was getting the remarks "is it real?  Can it be?"  She recognized the name of the signature on the note.  It was one of the founders of her University, Thammasat.  Pridi Banomyong.  This guy (I have learned) was one of a few up-and-coming western educated "commoners" known as "promoters" who had been exposed to the ideals of Western democracy, nationalism, and, unfortunately communism.  The good news is that communism never took hold in Thailand, and everyone lived happily ever after under a sort of compromise between old-line traditional monarchy and constitutional democracy.  But this guy's role in founding the University my wife went to is what she knows him for.  She posted a scan of the note to a group of friends from college on-line, and confessed that she was impressed.  

I used the opportunity while she was facing her computer to place some bids on secret prohibited coins of course.

2 2


4 Comments


Recommended Comments

Given the diversity of coins, banknotes, tokens etc there will always be something that people will have an interest in it is just finding it, it is great that your wife has now joined the community even if only in a small way!

My wife likes animals on coins - so I also have some modern pandas and lunar coins but I try and keep that quiet as they are less than a 100 years old :roflmao: 

Share this comment


Link to comment

Very cool post! 

I had almost the exact same story about 7 years ago when I bought some paper Riel from Cambodia. 

My wife was born in Cambodia and happened to escape from the Khmer Rouge and make it to the United States in 1975.

When I bought the Cambodian Riel, it was the first time she and my mother in-law had seen any of their money in 30 years. They looked at the bills and studied them like children looking at something for the first time.

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 3/2/2020 at 8:02 AM, ColonialCoinsUK said:

My wife likes animals on coins - so I also have some modern pandas and lunar coins but I try and keep that quiet as they are less than a 100 years old :roflmao: 

I confess to having some pandas and the 2016 monkey coin.  Pandas are the only appealing modern bullion coin I can think of.

My wife probably cannot be said to have joined the community, but I think her mom was in it before I was born.  She gave me a huge pile of copper Thai satang coins a few years back that she'd accumulated in the 50's or 60's.

Share this comment


Link to comment
23 hours ago, THE WELSH DRAGON said:

Very cool post! 

I had almost the exact same story about 7 years ago when I bought some paper Riel from Cambodia. 

My wife was born in Cambodia and happened to escape from the Khmer Rouge and make it to the United States in 1975.

When I bought the Cambodian Riel, it was the first time she and my mother in-law had seen any of their money in 30 years. They looked at the bills and studied them like children looking at something for the first time.

Cambodia - that's a rough deal there.  If anyone wonders what could be worse than a monarchy or great wealth inequality, look next door to Thailand.  In any direction.  Your example is great.  It is a good feeling to be able to share something with people and bring them back forgotten memories especially if they come from a good time, or at least much better time.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now