I Couldn't Be More Pleased!

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gherrmann44

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A few months ago, I purchased a Spanish Provisional Government 1868 5-peseta copper pattern from an E-Bay seller in Argentina. The listing picture wasn't too good and it seemed like the pattern was a little suspect. Still, this piece is scarce and I have wanted one for quite some time. If I could get it on the cheap, all the better. With what I thought was a fair bid, I won the piece for about half what I could expect to pay for a certified piece.

When the pattern arrived, I was very happy with it except that there were areas of the piece with a tarlike sticky residue. The residue was trapped in some of the crevices, lettering, and knife edges of the piece. I knew that I wanted it certified and I decided to submit it to NCS for review, conservation, and grading. 

I got my 5-peseta pattern back last week, conserved and graded MS-63. According to the population report, there was one MS-62, one MS-63, and two MS-64's. Add mine to it and its two MS-63's! Looking at my pattern in the hand, the overall look didn't show significant change except that it looked a lot sharper. The tar was successfully removed from the legend making the letters look much sharper. The knife-edges of the rim were clean and sharp only leaving a lightly stained surface with no pitting or metal corrosion. The real change was in the mountain area of Hispania's left elbow. Some of the other offensive toning was subdued but not removed. NCS states that they cannot reverse or remove copper toning. 

I offer this pictorial evidence of before and after conservation. The before photo of the mountains is slightly out of focus but it shows the most significant changes. The mountains and in particular Hispania's fingers are clean and much more detailed. The crevices are all clean and sharp. In the hand it makes a tremendous difference. What detail, like it just came off the dies! 

There is one more thing that I found quite interesting. Sometimes when digital cameras have either lighting or surface anomalies issues they can't focus correctly on the subject. In this case, if you look closely in the center of the before mountain picture, there is horizontal detail where there should be vertical detail like the mountains of the after picture. 

I have used NCS on several occasions and in some instances, I have not liked the results. Over time I have become better in selecting candidates for conservation. This piece was a no-brainer for me and I am delighted with the results. Gary

1868_5P_side_by_side_Espania.jpg

1868_5P_side_by_side_Mountains.jpg

1868_5P_side_by_side_obv.jpg

1868_5P_side_by_side_Pillar.jpg

1868_5P_side_by_side_rev.jpg

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That coin looks so much more defined-- from fingers, mountains to simple lettering ( has "depth").. they did a fantastic job and kudos to you for preserving such a fine coin.

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I have used NCS on several occasions and in some instances, I have not liked the results. Over time I have become better in selecting candidates for conservation. This piece was a no-brainer for me and I am delighted with the results.

I've been using NCS for many years, and most of the time the results have very positive.  Nearly all have been submitted on the recommendation of NGC personnel, so only a few have been a disappointment.  I'm getting better at recognizing good NCS candidates based on their recommendations but I've still got a lot to learn.

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23 minutes ago, coin928 said:

I've been using NCS for many years, and most of the time the results have very positive.  Nearly all have been submitted on the recommendation of NGC personnel, so only a few have been a disappointment.  I'm getting better at recognizing good NCS candidates based on their recommendations but I've still got a lot to learn.

The instances I haven't liked were two silver coins that I thought had near fatal toning which took away from the eye appeal. NCS reviewed them and conserved them. When they came back numerous hairlines and generally poor surface conditions were unmasked. A couple of things I learned. First I should think about the eye appeal and toning BEFORE I buy the coin. One of the coins I am referring to I still own. It came back the same way it went with an MS-64 grade. It is still in my registry but I use the old pictures to show the coin rather than the new ones. Of course if I ever list it for sale, I'll use the new ones. I have had my best luck in conserving copper coins like this one! Previously, I did send in a silver coin with PVC green residue on the coin that came back very nice.

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Congratulations :)  it is always nice to be "right" once in a while in this hobby.  It helps heal the pain of missing so many other times.  :);)  That is a nice a nice looking both before and after.  Your thread has encouraged to send in an 1870 IHC that is a bit of a mess. I will keep you posted. 

Edited by rons

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