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    • dena

      Try the new NGC Journals!   03/22/2017

      NGC has launched a new and improved NGC Journals! Available on NGCcoin.com, the new NGC Journals improves upon the popular platform to write blogs and discuss them with other members. The new NGC Journals has an improved design that makes it significantly easier to post and read journals from any device, including smartphones and tablets. Adding images has been made much simpler, and the NGC Journals now give users the ability to create polls and "like" other entries. A popular feature of the old NGC Journals was the ability to open an entry to comments from other users. This feature has been retained and enhanced — users can now comment on the same page as the original Journal entry, creating a seamless experience. Best of all, the same login can be used to post Journals, make comments and access the other features of the NGC website. Old NGC Journals entries will be migrated to the new NGC Journals soon. In the meantime, users can make posts to the new NGC Journals. To get started, create a Journal and make an entry. Unlike the old NGC Journals, you create a single Journal and then add new entries to it. Your Journal can be customized with a cover photo, and you can choose to make it available to all users or only to the users that you select. You can also choose to receive notifications whenever people comment on one of your entries. Scroll below for helpful tips on using the new NGC Journals or go to the new NGC Journals now >   Instructions / Tips To get started, you must first create your Journal and then you can add entries to that Journal. Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

        Click Create a Journal

        Name your journal, add a description, add a photo, and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

        Click Add Journal Entry to add a post to your journal

        Commenting on another user's Journal is easy. After selecting a journal to read, scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the field where you may enter your comments and see the comments others have posted.
    • dena

      Chat Boards Briefly Down for Maintenance Thursday, April 13 at 9am ET   04/12/2017

      We are performing some maintenance on the chat boards Thursday,  April 13. The message boards will be unavailable for a brief time starting at 9am ET. Thank you and we apologize for any inconvenience.

Journals

Our community journals

  1. Please do not add any "likes" to anything I post on journals ( or the chat boards). I find the whole facebook phenomenon to be a sad indictment of our self involved society. An entire aspect of modern society focused on self-centered, "hey look at me, what I did, ate, drank, vacationed" etc-- in desperate need for some petty validation by being "liked".  Thank You............

     

    Now to you, journal....

    One of my strategies I've had with collecting is to keep several sets in the process of building simultaneously. Often I will have a world set or 2, a themed "custom set", an album of thumbuster grade/quality coins, and a few US coin short sets. This strategy has worked well since I have many items to look for at each premium auction or when my coin budget is flush. I never feel like I have not added any additions to my set and am then  never tempted to overpay for a new hole-filler to sate my collecting desire.

    With several sets going at once ( but not too many) I can usually find a few hole fillers for different sets, then I simply weigh which one to purchase ( factoring scarcity, a good price, PQ quality, likelihood of finding another etc) based on the varying factors.

    With my 2 US coin sets down to the final 2 or 3 slots needed and pickings slim, I looked toward my themed sets and world sets. I snagged 3 really nice coins for my Bear themed coin set. A 2017 polar bear coin with diamond dust sprinkled to make it look like the snow and ice sparkle--very cool coin. The second bear coin was one I've been watching for since Gary posted his ( he got it because the obverse is an allegorical female, I bought the Greenland coin because of the regal beast which is on the reverse.) The 3rd bear coin was a clever geometric configuration design which forms a swimming polar bear and cub under the northern lights...all 3 are already on their way to Sarasota with a few others.

    I did find a few coins to add directly to registry sets however--my Jersey 1/12th Shilling set is a cool set and I just like the series. The series encompasses 89 years from 1877 until 1966 but only has 23 coins in it. There are several combinations of the reverse shield ( lion design, pointed or rounded shield, size of shield, lettering, etc) along with 9 different busts of monarchs on the front from younger Victoria to the youthful Elizabeth II and all of those between. There are no extremely scarce or pricey issues but they are low enough mintage to make it a challenge--especially if you are going for BU quality coins. I added a 1923 Rounded tip shield and the 1937 issue--pictured is my newest addition the 1937 with Georgus VI..............

    2955580_DetailsThumb_Rev.jpg

    2955580_DetailsThumb_Obv.jpg

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    morganthebrave
    Latest Entry

    Richard Lobel minted many Edward VIII coinage  - mostly in the 1980's 58fdd0c2b2fc6_bi-metalEdwardVIIIobv.JPG.bdf6ce0cb241dd055fa17fa56bcda724.JPG

  2. chris

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    mean s&w are pedigree and philly the standard if no mint mark

  3. rmw
    Latest Entry

    Here is an example of the first farthing in the milled series, from 1672. 

    These were often not produced with quality control in mind but this one came out very well for the type.

    It is made from copper and after 345 years i still has some original mint red on it!

    1672 farthing obverse.jpg

    1672 farthing reverse.jpg

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    Anyone done business with World-Numismatics?  Looking at some of their coins and wondering how they are.  Do they ship fast?  Have quality products, trustworthy.  Returns hassle free?  Just some info on them if anyone has bought from them in the past.  I believe they are in England, because they list everything in pounds for prices.  That is no big deal though.  As always Thank you everyone.

  4. I'm an avid fan of the American Silver Eagles.  I take pride in maintaining a 100% NGC collection.  I may not be the highest ranked but I have all of them, varieties included.  I'm just wondering where, from April 10, 2017 to April 16, 2016, a mysterious 2016(S) Minted in San Francisco variety was added?  I've never seen one listed for sale and there is no population report available.  It's second quarter 2017, they didn't just mint them.  Where's this mysterious coin?  I notice there is now a spot for the 2017(S) Minted in San Francisco variety so I expect it will be issued sometime this year (but, why have a slot for a non-issued coin?) and will be on the look for it.  The 2017S PF slot is now available as the coin was released recently and I already have my coin ordered for it.  I missed out on the unlimited purchase quantity available from the mint because the big companies bought all of them in 2 minutes.  I would welcome a reply from NGC as to how these mysterious slots came from.

  5. Stack's Bowers conducted the auctions associated with the recent Baltimore show, including internet-only sessions after the show. I won three lots (six coins) from one of those internet-only sessions. One lot was a decent circulated 1844-O placeholder for my collection of half dimes. A second lot consisted of four half dimes, the first of which was the one I wanted - an AU 1842 with reverse die cracks. I will probably write something about those two lots in future journals.

    The topic for now is the third lot I won. It is an 1848 "medium date" half dime. What caught my eye is that the date is noticeably farther to the right than on other 1848 half dimes. I looked for info, but neither Valentine (1931) nor Blythe (1992) mention it. The newer book by Bowers (2016) says only a few examples are known. The variety is discussed in a couple short Gobrecht Journal articles from 1993, where discovery credit is given to Neil (1927).

    I was not specifically aware of the "date far right" variety of 1848 half dimes when I first saw the photo of my new coin. But I have been looking carefully at Liberty Seated half dimes for some time now. And when something catches my attention, I check it out. In this case, I noticed what appears still to be a rare variety.

    The auction session occurred when I was on vacation several time zones west. Before the trip, I wasn't sure I'd be able to bid live, so I entered an absentee bid. Because the coin is a rare variety in a series that is not (yet) especially popular, I had no idea what to expect to have to pay to get it. The coin is in a PCGS AU53 holder. I bid about four times the FMV for a garden variety 1848 half dime. While on vacation, I received email notification that I had won it - for garden variety price! Apparently no one else noticed or cared that it was an unusual variety.

    So this is another case of finding something interesting and rare for regular price. More such things are certainly out there. If you learn about the things you collect and have the time to look, you can find things like this too. It has been a lot of fun for me...

     

    Alan

    1848 V-9 P53 Obv 600.JPG

    1848 V-9 P53 Rev 600.JPG

  6. The Buffalo Nickel since its release in 1913 is still a collector favorite. Today the legacy of the Buffalo Nickel and its sculptor live on in the 2001 American Buffalo Silver Dollar and $50, .9999 fine, Gold Buffalo. As such, when collectors hear the name of James Earle Fraser they almost invariably think of the Buffalo Nickel.

    Likewise, but to a smaller degree are some of the medallic works of Laura Gardin Fraser and in particular her rendition of “Fame” featured on the obverse of the National Institute of Social Sciences gold medal. The National Institute of Social Sciences gold medal, first awarded in 1913 continues to be awarded today on an annual basis. The obverse image of Laura Gardin Fraser’s portrayal of Fame appears prominently at the head of every page on the National Institute of Social Sciences website. As such the image of this beautiful medal is permanently associated with the National Institute of Social Sciences and it is a legacy to the artistic abilities of Laura Gardin Fraser. [1]

    The National Institute of Social Sciences was founded in 1912 under the charter of the American Social Science Association incorporated by Act of Congress, January 28, 1899. From Article II of their constitution the object of The National Institute of Social Sciences is to, “promote the study of Social Science and to reward distinguished services rendered to humanity, either by election to the National Institute, or by the bestowal of medals or other insignia.”

    Consequently, the annual awarding of their gold medal is one of their primary functions as an organization. This medal is of such importance that its design is set forth in Article XI of their constitution as follows: “Presentation medals shall bear the Figure of Fame resting on a Shield, holding wreaths of laurel. The shield to bear the name of the Institute. In the left hand, the figure to hold a palm branch. The reverse to show a torch with a name plate and Dignus Honore, the motto of the Institute.” The Latin phrase Dignus Honore is translated, “Worthy of Honor.” [2]

    It is said that within the context of armed conflict you will find both the best and worst of humanity on display. To recognize the humanitarian contributions of those persons involved with the war effort during Word War 1, the National Liberty Committee of American Social Science Association adopted the following resolution dated January 18, 1918: “In view of the fact that, except in the army and navy, no provision has been made by any competent authority for the recognition by a medal or other suitable insignia for notable humanitarian or patriotic services for the national welfare: Therefore, the executive committee of the American Social Science Association, one of the oldest of nationally incorporated bodies, recommends that a medal to be designated "Liberty Service" medal be authorized. The committee further recommends that the National Institute of Social Sciences be empowered, in accordance with the object of its organization, to award and bestow said medal upon such person or persons as have rendered or may render notable services which merit such special mark of distinction and recognition.” [3]

    The effect of the National Liberty Committee resolution was that Liberty and Patriotic Service medals were awarded to a number of individuals, both civilian and governmental for their service in a time of war from 1918-1920. The medal in my collection is a bronze Patriotic Service Medal awarded to the Director of the Bureau of Field Nursing Service of the American Red Cross, Clara D. Noyes. The following is the text of her medal citation and response.

    July 1, 1919

    To Miss Clara D. Noyes,

    As Director of the Bureau of Field Nursing Service of the American Red Cross at national headquarters, you rendered to your country and its wounded a service of high and inestimable value. During the entire period of the war you had charge of the distribution and placing of all the Red Cross nurses assigned to the army, navy and public health. Under your direction, 19,877 nurses have passed through your bureau.

    American Red Cross, Washington, D. C.

    My dear Dr. Johnson:

    It is with keen appreciation of the honor conferred upon me that I acknowledge the receipt of the citation and the Patriotic Service Medal, presented to me by the National Institute of Social Sciences, in recognition of the services I have performed during the war as Director of the Bureau of Field Nursing Service of the American Red Cross. In the selection and assignment of approximately 20,000 nurses to military and civilian duty, I was always keenly alive to the privilege that had been accorded me. Any work or anxiety connected with this responsibility has been more than offset by the devotion, the courage, and the fine character of service rendered by the nurses while engaged in the care of our sick and wounded soldiers and sailors, and the civilian population of our allies. In the name of the nurses I represent, and my own, I again thank you for the honor conferred upon me.

    Believe me, Very Sincerely yours, Clara D. Noyes, Acting Director, Department of Nursing. [4]

    According to Medallic Art Company historian D. Wayne Johnson, Laura Gardin Fraser utilized one of eleven monograms when signing her medallic creations. Of interest to me is that she signed this medal “Laura Gardin Fecit,” which is reminiscent of C. GOBRECHT F. on the Gobrecht Dollar. Thus, as long as the National Institute of Social Sciences awards their gold medal, those persons associated with the institute are reminded that “Laura Gardin made it.” [5]

    As I become more familiar with the work of Laura Gardin Fraser and by extension the work of her husband, James Earle Fraser I am able to see certain similarities in their medallic art. For instance, except for the flame, the torch on the reverse of this 1913 medal is exactly the same as the torch on the obverse of the 1914 American Museum of Public Safety Edward H. Harriman Memorial Medal modeled by James Earle Fraser. Furthermore, I also see similarities in the fonts both Frasers used on their medals. When I mentioned this to a friend who is much more knowledgeable in all things “Fraser” than I, he suggested that if James couldn’t expeditiously finish a medal, Laura would complete the minor devices of the medal such as the torch and legend on the aforementioned public safety medal. Accordingly, it seems that not only did the Frasers have a good marriage but that they were also an artistic team complementing each other.

    1. http://www.socialsciencesinstitute.org/

    2. Proceedings of the ... annual meeting of the National Institute of Social Sciences., 9th:no.1 (1922) pg. 99-100

    3. Journal of the National Institute of Social Sciences Volume IV April 1, 1918 pg. 173

    4. Journal of the National Institute of Social Sciences Volume VI July 1, 1920 pg. 103

    5. http://medalartists.com/fraser-laura-gardin.html

    The 1913 National Institute of Social Services Medal_small.png

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    Friends,

     As I was really thinking of getting away from the state quarter series I did decide to do another submission on the quest. A little surprised on the conflicts needed to enter this journal but I see things getting rougher as time passes. Anyway -- seeing that our journals are no longer part of our member page I have a hard time thinking that all is so well with NGC!! This is definitely going to be a rough ride!!  I will renew my membership in a month and try a few submissions.

     Hope things get better!!!

    Rick 

  7. This is related to Hawaii !!!

    NOTE: You can tell the writing style difference of an author's journal entry  by the subject matter. On one hand you get regurgitation of previously documented information or what one owns. It's OK, but not exciting or groundbreaking. On the other hand you get thought provoking or I did not know this with a dumbfoundedness result. I hope I'm in the later category.

    Bernard von NotHaus was one of the co-founders of The Hawaiian Mint, which evolved into the Royal Hawaiian Mint, and he got into a heap of trouble with the US Government with his National Organization For the Repeal of the Federal Reserve Act (NORFED) coinage and currency.

    As a Hawaiiana numismatist, I must cover all numismatic aspects related to the Hawaiian Islands. The original NORFED Liberty dollars is such a coin. It's listed in World Price Guide at the NGC website:

    https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/united-states-10-liberty-dollars-x-201-1998-cuid-1075971-duid-1633923

    Waifs in Gold Boots, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, was created by the Royal Hawaiian Mint to document their issues. This spreadsheet was in the public domain at one point. Anyway, listed in this spreadsheet are three design elements that tell the story of the 1998 NORFED Libery dollar.

    wigb.thumb.jpg.0a782c1a94fbdb7eb4afff5db0756275.jpg

    This is a must have reference for Hawaiiana numismatist. Note the mintage (column J) and other key numismatic information!

    The image below is a visual of my original research finding. (I used a silver specimen of the 1975 Kamehameha issue with the "EARTH" design)

    norfeddesign.thumb.jpg.9a54bf817670a6635366ec00512f3faa.jpg

    As you can plainly see, the incorporation of design elements to form the original 1998 NORFED Liberty dollar came from previous issues of the The Hawaiian Mint/Royal Hawaiian Mint.

    This research would make a splendid exhibit, along with the controversy of this first 1998 NORFED issue.

    I was in a state of dumbfoundedness when I first discovered this and the first to document this find in my personal blog a few years ago.

    Finally, the mintage of the 1998 Liberty Dollar X# 201 is 150 specimens (which is not documented anywhere , except in  Waifs in Gold Boots).

     

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    Well My gut feel on the S mint Proof Silver Eagle would sell out fast.

     

    But I got to say it sold out faster than even than my assumptions. I logged on early at 11:30 made sure my log in and credit card was up to date. All of this prep helped me out because I had my order confirmed within 30 seconds. I feel the mint kind a blew it They release a popular coin, the 2nd lowest mintage of all time for the series and they didn't put a order limit on it.  Why would they do this? It motivated the dealers to scarf them up at a record pace! It also blocked a lot of the collectors from adding one to their personal collections. I own a complete set of Proof silver eagles and knew the hype would explode.  

     

    It really was a bit of a secret that the Congratulations Set 2017 would have a Sanfrancisco minted silver eagle,  But you would learn this if you were subscribed to mint blogs or checked coin  world weekly?  So what are the opinions of the collectors, do you feel the mint left most of us high and dry?

     

    It even appears that even NGC was caught by surprise. Because the default trolley label won't be available until April 19th.

     

    2017_S_Eagle_S1_Congrats set.jpeg

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    When I arrived home today I noticed a thick large padded envelope sitting on the kitchen table that my wife brought in sometime today from the mail box and it was from NGC and thinking what can this be and to my delight it was a plague with my Registry award for my Icelandic Kingdom Era Collection. Was not expecting this at all, maybe a paper certificate.  Thank You NGC for this wonderful plaque and I will proudly display it in my home.    

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    Chris B
    Latest Entry

    I have been collecting my whole life. My collection has taken many wandering paths to arrive where it is today. For years I built sets of U.S coins because that is what I thought you were supposed to do. The few dealers that I had access to (pre-internet) had no interest in foreign coins or really anything that they didn't have. In fact they tried to steer me away from anything other than US coins. They lead me to believe that world coins were junk and not worthy of being collected seriously.

    In recent years I have had my eyes opened. It started when I got bored with the coins in my collection. I decided I wanted to build a set of large cents by date. That was quite an eye opener. This set is still a work in progress and will never be truly complete. Large cents introduced me to collecting by die varieties. I know, not my original intention, but there has been so much research done on these that it is a natural progression. I fell in love hard with my large cents but as the set grew the pieces needed became increasing pricey so I started looking for alternatives to our large cents.

    When I first started dabbling with world coins I kept hearing in my head all the reasons I have been given not to do this. Larger world coins were my first interest. There are so many different examples in all price ranges. My favorites are from the 1700's and 1800's but I do not limit myself to these areas.

    As I said my collection has and still takes a meandering path. My feeling is that you shouldn't avoid an item simply because it doesn't fit in your collection. I have said many times, buy a coin you like and if it doesn't go up in value you will still have something you like. This goes against the advice of a lot of well known collectors. They say you should be more focused. Sorry, to me focused is boring. I am excited to spend time with my collection as often as possible. Collect in a way that excites you, whatever that may be. Don't let anybody tell you what you should like and how to collect.

    Photos:

    1) German States 1705 2/3 Thaler NGC XF45 ex Eric Newman

    2) Angola 1814 Macuta NGC MS62BN

    Ger170501.jpg

    Ang181401.jpg

  8. I was trying out my new book I got today, "COINS OF ENGLAND & THE UNITED KINGDOM" put out by SPINK, and I am having a hard time understanding its reference to a coin that I'm realizing that I know very little about.  I have a 1849 Florin and I thought that only 48'S & 49's were the "godless" type A.  But in my new book it looks like they can also be the "gothic" type B.  Can anyone shine some light on this?

    20170401_191554-1.jpg

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    Does anyone know what the current modern turn around times are?  Thank you.

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    My intention in writing this entry is not to come across as an advertisement because that is my last intention (you can check out my registry sets right here on the site). In all honesty, I want to share the following information for fellow collectors who find themselves in the exact position I was in merely a month ago.

    In saying that, over the years, my collection has grown to be quite valuable. I take pride in the work I have put into my collection, as I have dedicated years of my life to the hobby. As time progressed, I started thinking more and more about protecting my collection. I do not necessarily see my collection as an investment since I collect for sheer love of the hobby, but I knew it would have been naive to not at least attempt seeking some type of insurance that went beyond just a safe.

    This leads me to my ultimate topic I wish to discuss. Currently, all my coins are housed in pretty sturdy safes; nevertheless, a safe only goes so far. A good friend of mine is in the insurance industry here in Colorado so I thought I would approach her about what options I might have in insuring my collection.

    She took on the task and spent a great deal of time and work trying to find a company that would take on the risk and provide a policy that would insure the full value of my collection. Eventually, she found a great company that specializes in insuring coins. So, what are some of the specs that go along with such? Well, for those of you that find yourselves in the position I was in, I have proof-of-purchase for the majority of all my coin purchases, an inventory list, they're housed in safes and I was able to come up with a ball-park estimate of the collection's value. With these details alone, my friend was able to get me a great policy. They insured my entire collection for its full value. A few perks included in the plan is coins that are shipped for grading are automatically covered under the policy. Additionally, the plan includes a 1% increase every month for the total value of the collection which allows for the appreciation of my coins and the addition of new coins (if I were to get a really expensive piece, I could always change the total value of my policy beyond the 1% that's already included). If I were to ever experience a loss (theft, fire, flood, etc.), the company would cut me a check for the value of the coins lost.

    The one caveat in all this is she is licensed in Colorado. As a result of this, if you're interested in insuring your collection, you would need to either be a resident or living in the state of Colorado. Nevertheless, once the plan went into effect, it was almost as though I felt a weight lifted off my shoulders. I am aware that every coin is unique and could never be replaced, even with a check. However, knowing they're now insured really gives me a sense of security and pride. I was shocked by how low the annual premium was and how understanding the numismatic insurance company was regarding the hobby, in general.

    So, if any of you are either living in or a resident of Colorado and are interested in insuring your collection, shoot me an email and I will provide the contact information for my agent. She's talented, smart and looks out for the best interest of her clients while focusing on finding them the most affordable plan that meets their standards and goals for a collecting policy. If you don't like it, there's no pressure to commit. Nonetheless, if you're interested to simply know what's out there regarding the options of insuring your collection, I highly suggest you give her a ring. I have found, especially in this hobby, being informed goes a long way.

     

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    And why does Heritage Auctions put them in their own category?

    Before they became a US territory in 1900, the islands of Hawaii had been unified into a kingdom that existed for nearly a century. The Kingdom of Hawaii issued their own coinage, cents in 1847 and a series of silver coins in 1883. The cents were struck by a private firm in Massachusetts and the silver dimes, quarters, halves and dollars were designed by Charles Barber and were produced at the San Francisco Mint. These issues are what I consider to be the coins of Hawaii. 

    Even though Hawaii is now a US state, I think of the coins of Hawaii as "world" coins and would expect to see them in world coin auctions just as I expect to see the coins of Puerto Rico and the coins of the Philippines (although I admit the argument for including the US produced coins of the Philippines in US coin auctions is compelling). However, if you browse a Heritage world coin auction you will typically see the top categories as Ancient coins, World coins and Coins of Hawaii. I don't have an answer for why they have their own category but I imagine it has to do with bidding action.

    I have gotten used to seeing the coins of Hawaii in their own Heritage category but lately I have observed a trend that I personally do not care for. Within the Coins of Hawaii category, Heritage has started to include bullion "medals", with Hawaiian themes issued by a company calling themselves the Royal Hawaiian Mint. Some of these may have a connection to a State of Hawaii government office but I believe the majority are strictly private issues. Now there's nothing wrong with collecting exonumia; I just find their placement in the same category to be potentially confusing. 

    Now that you know a bit of the history of the official coins of the Kingdom of Hawaii, please understand the difference when you come across a Hawaiian themed medal, regardless how "royal" it seems.

    Here's my example of the silver dollar (akahi dala).

    ~jack 

    http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/usercontent/images/journals/
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    And I bet you are wondering where to begin. Each user may create a journal and add multiple entries to it.

    Create your Journal by following these steps:

    Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

     

    1 choose journals from browse menu.jpg

     

     

     Click Create a Journal

    2 click Create a Journal.jpg

     

     

    Name your journal, add a description, add a photo and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

     

    3 name the blog and add description.jpg3a name the blog and add description.jpg

     

     

     

     

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    How do you use the journals?

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  9. Mancoin

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