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      Try the new NGC Journals!   03/22/2017

      NGC has launched a new and improved NGC Journals! Available on NGCcoin.com, the new NGC Journals improves upon the popular platform to write blogs and discuss them with other members. The new NGC Journals has an improved design that makes it significantly easier to post and read journals from any device, including smartphones and tablets. Adding images has been made much simpler, and the NGC Journals now give users the ability to create polls and "like" other entries. A popular feature of the old NGC Journals was the ability to open an entry to comments from other users. This feature has been retained and enhanced — users can now comment on the same page as the original Journal entry, creating a seamless experience. Best of all, the same login can be used to post Journals, make comments and access the other features of the NGC website. Old NGC Journals entries will be migrated to the new NGC Journals soon. In the meantime, users can make posts to the new NGC Journals. To get started, create a Journal and make an entry. Unlike the old NGC Journals, you create a single Journal and then add new entries to it. Your Journal can be customized with a cover photo, and you can choose to make it available to all users or only to the users that you select. You can also choose to receive notifications whenever people comment on one of your entries. Scroll below for helpful tips on using the new NGC Journals or go to the new NGC Journals now >   Instructions / Tips To get started, you must first create your Journal and then you can add entries to that Journal. Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

        Click Create a Journal

        Name your journal, add a description, add a photo, and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

        Click Add Journal Entry to add a post to your journal

        Commenting on another user's Journal is easy. After selecting a journal to read, scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the field where you may enter your comments and see the comments others have posted.

Journals

Our community journals

  1. Amarillo1

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    amarillo1
    Latest Entry

    :roflmao:Hi, can any please help me to fine the pop list. Since that change this I can not fine any thing, I only hope that I can fine your Nasser. Thanks don

  2. Where can I find Following/Follow

  3.  
    Ancient Greece (Pontos, Amisos): silver drachm or siglos featuring Hera and owl, ca. late 5th to 4th century BC
    full?d=1493453232
    (Presently raw)
     
    Ancient Greece (Kingdom of Macedon), silver "Mercenaries" drachm of King Perseus, ca. 175-170 BC
    full?d=1482831030
    (NGC Ch MS; Strike 5/5, Surface 5/5)
     
    Ancient Roman Republic: silver denarius of moneyer L. Furius Brocchus, ca. 63 BC
    full?d=1493450822
    (NGC Ch VF; Strike 5/5, Surface 4/5)
     
    Ancient Roman Empire: silver "Capricorn" denarius of Vespasian, struck by Titus ca. 80-81 AD
    full?d=1482832082
    (Presently raw)
     
    Ancient Roman Empire: silver denarius of Septimius Severus, "Dea Caelestis" type, ca. 193-211 AD
    full?d=1482832564
    (NGC Ch AU; Strike 4/5, Surface 4/5)
     
    Ancient Byzantine Empire: gold tremissis of Justinian I, ca. 527-565 AD
    full?d=1482832977
    (NGC MS; Strike 5/5, Surface 4/5, "wrinkled")
     
    England (Anglo-Saxon): silver penny of Aethelred II, struck ca. 997-1003 AD
    full?d=1482835278
    (PCGS MS63)
     
    Netherlands (Gelderland): "St. John" type goldgulden (florin) of Arnold van Egmond, ca. 1423-1472
    full?d=1482837861
    (PCGS Genuine; XF details, "Filed Rims")
     
    Belgium (Brabant): gold florin (Carolus d’or) of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, ca. 1521-1545
    full?d=1482838290
    (Presently raw)
     
    German States (Teutonic Order): silver 1/4-thaler of Grand Master Maximilian of Austria, ca. 1615
    full?d=1483098655
    (PCGS XF45)
     
    Great Britain: silver "South Sea Company" shilling of George I, 1723
    full?d=1482840026
    (PCGS MS63+, formerly NGC MS64)
     
    Belgium (Austrian Netherlands): copper 2 liards (2 Oorden), Insurrection coinage, 1790
    full?d=1482841679
    (NGC MS63 BN)
     
    Great Britain: gilt copper proof halfpenny of George III, Soho Mint, 1806
    full?d=1482843904
    (PCGS PR65 DCAM, formerly NGC PR64 CAM)
     
    Great Britain: silver shilling of George IV, off-center mint error, ca. 1826-1829
    full?d=1482845935
    (PCGS XF40)
     
    United States: gold 5-dollar half-eagle, Liberty Head type, 1842-D (small date)
    full?d=1482845081
    (PCGS VF30; CAC)
     
    Liberia: proof copper cent, 1847
    full?d=1482847004
    (PCGS PR65 BN)
     
    France: copper specimen striking of a 10-centime pattern (essai), 1848
    full?d=1482847616
    (PCGS SP65 RB)
     
    United States: bronze Civil War token, "Our Little Monitor" type, 1863
    USA-MonitorCWT-1863-016565-coin-800x500.
    (NGC MS65 BN)
     
    United States: proof copper-nickel 3-cent piece, Liberty head type, 1888
    USA-3cN-1888-057500-coin-800x500.jpg
    (PCGS PR65 CAM)
     
    Great Britain: gold half-sovereign of Queen Victoria, 1901, from the Terner Collection
    GB-HalfSov-1901-029500-coin-800x500.jpg
    (PCGS MS64)
     
     
  4. 36-pl-western-fort-worth-herd-fort-worth-cvb.jpg

    Hello everyone,

     

    I spent last Saturday afternoon & evening using my new camera and copy stand to take pictures of my Morgan Dollar Collection so that I could share them with the community. They are in my collection named Hell's Half Acre Hoard of Morgan Dollars just like the post title if you would like to see them. The camera is really not a professional one but I think it did a pretty good job for a point and click. I would recommend getting a copy stand for anyone who is wanting to take pictures of their collection to share with the group or just for insurance purposes. I was just using the camera on the IPhone with no stand but as you can guess the results weren't very good. The Stand lets me get a repeatable set up and results.

     

    Photo Jan 22, 11 39 47 AM.jpg

  5. This is one of about 100 pieces made of the proof halfcrown of 1746. It was originally one of a 4 piece set, sixpence to crown. Of the 100 pieces, many have been impaired over the last 271 years. This one has not.

    I have a matching shilling as well but not the sixpence. the crown in this condition Im afraid is too expensive for me so I would be content to get an original unimpaired sixpence. Although special proof strikes were made earlier, this 4 piece set is reputed to be the earliest proof set for collectors produced anywhere in the world.

    1746 Proof Halfcrown, obverse.jpeg

    1746 Proof Halfcrown, reverse.jpeg

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    Recent Entries

    Daniel McMunn
    Latest Entry

    I was lucky enough to buy a 1950 s/d Washington quarter in ms67. What was unusual about it is there is no toning what so ever. It looks like it was minted today. Almost all are moderate to heavy toning. They sell on Ebay for between $1800 and $2500 with varying degrees of toning But I paid more than twice that just for the beauty.

    170225224546953604015.jpg

    170225224619953637296.jpg

  6. When I read Jackson64’s journal, “Added coins 4 and 5 to my Jersey 1/12 shilling set” I got stoked because there was much about what he was saying about his style of collecting that matches my own. For instance, I like to manage 4 or 5 sets at a time like he does. Currently, I am working on a US type set, along with my custom sets Inspirational Ladies, The Use of Seated Imagery in Numismatics, and The Coins and Medals of Laura Gardin Fraser.

    Still, there is a bit of a twist to my collecting habits that is slightly different meaning that I am actively pursuing coins for my US type set and LGF custom set while at the same time passively seeking coins for the other two. By passively, I mean that if I run across something that I like and it fits into the Inspirational Ladies and Seated Imagery sets, I will often buy those coins. Recently I bought a new coin for my Inspirational Ladies custom set.

    I get a lot of coin related e-mails listing various coins for sale and I tend to peruse most of them. Much of the time I see nothing of interest and immediately delete them. However, a recent e-mail from Talisman Coins listed a really cool 150th anniversary of Canadian confederation 2017 silver dollar featuring Miss Canada. For a while there, I was hemming and hawing about purchasing it as a single coin.

    A little later I got another e-mail from Talisman listing a Canadian proof set with the Miss Canada Silver Dollar included but with a twist. This coin was different in that it had gold plating in selected places on the coin. When I saw a picture of this coin my jaw about dropped. Rarely have I seen medallic art with the level of intricacy and beauty as is this coin! The only possible show stopper was that it was not offered as a single but only in a set with proof versions of the other Canadian circulating coins. So I bought seven coins to get one.

    I considered cracking out the dollar to submit it separately. That said, this set is not at all cheesy because every single one of the circulating coins were struck up in pure silver, from the nickel to the “toonie.” The standard dollar, Miss Canada dollar, and two dollar all have some level of gold plating. Pulling the dollar and submitting it would have been easy had the coins been mounted in individual capsules.

    When the set arrived it came packaged with book-like leather covers and the coins encased in a single plastic mount. Simply put, this set is way too nice to crack out any of the coins for a submission. This presents a dilemma of how to enter the Miss Canada coin into the Inspirational Ladies set. Perhaps, I will have to buy eight coins to get one. Buy the single all silver uncirculated Miss Canada dollar, submit it, and post the pictures of the gold plated version. This all seems like a pretty big expense just to get one coin into my set. Sometimes this hobby of ours is just not logical! We’ll see, I’m in no hurry.

    On another front, I just purchased a very nicely toned PCGS MS-63 1853 with arrows Seated Liberty Dime for my type set replacing an XF-40 dime. This presents another problem of how to represent this new purchase in my NGC set. Simple, I just keep the old coin and use the MS-63 pictures. …Or, since this coin was toned I could search Heritage to see if my coin was ever auctioned. What I found was that Heritage auctioned it in 2004 in an NGC holder meaning that someone along the way cracked it out and sent it to PCGS. Thus if the holder number is still valid, I might try entering the old NGC number. Naw, this is all ridiculous I’m not going to that degree. Interestingly, NGC had the coin graded at MS-63 also. Happy collecting all!!!!
    Gary

    2017_Canada_Dollar_150_Anniversary copy.jpg

    2017_Canada_Proof_Set_obv copy.jpg

    2017_Canada_Proof_Set_rev copy.jpg

  7. Please do not add any "likes" to anything I post on journals ( or the chat boards). I find the whole facebook phenomenon to be a sad indictment of our self involved society. An entire aspect of modern society focused on self-centered, "hey look at me, what I did, ate, drank, vacationed" etc-- in desperate need for some petty validation by being "liked".  Thank You............

     

    Now to you, journal....

    One of my strategies I've had with collecting is to keep several sets in the process of building simultaneously. Often I will have a world set or 2, a themed "custom set", an album of thumbuster grade/quality coins, and a few US coin short sets. This strategy has worked well since I have many items to look for at each premium auction or when my coin budget is flush. I never feel like I have not added any additions to my set and am then  never tempted to overpay for a new hole-filler to sate my collecting desire.

    With several sets going at once ( but not too many) I can usually find a few hole fillers for different sets, then I simply weigh which one to purchase ( factoring scarcity, a good price, PQ quality, likelihood of finding another etc) based on the varying factors.

    With my 2 US coin sets down to the final 2 or 3 slots needed and pickings slim, I looked toward my themed sets and world sets. I snagged 3 really nice coins for my Bear themed coin set. A 2017 polar bear coin with diamond dust sprinkled to make it look like the snow and ice sparkle--very cool coin. The second bear coin was one I've been watching for since Gary posted his ( he got it because the obverse is an allegorical female, I bought the Greenland coin because of the regal beast which is on the reverse.) The 3rd bear coin was a clever geometric configuration design which forms a swimming polar bear and cub under the northern lights...all 3 are already on their way to Sarasota with a few others.

    I did find a few coins to add directly to registry sets however--my Jersey 1/12th Shilling set is a cool set and I just like the series. The series encompasses 89 years from 1877 until 1966 but only has 23 coins in it. There are several combinations of the reverse shield ( lion design, pointed or rounded shield, size of shield, lettering, etc) along with 9 different busts of monarchs on the front from younger Victoria to the youthful Elizabeth II and all of those between. There are no extremely scarce or pricey issues but they are low enough mintage to make it a challenge--especially if you are going for BU quality coins. I added a 1923 Rounded tip shield and the 1937 issue--pictured is my newest addition the 1937 with Georgus VI..............

    2955580_DetailsThumb_Rev.jpg

    2955580_DetailsThumb_Obv.jpg

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    morganthebrave
    Latest Entry

    Richard Lobel minted many Edward VIII coinage  - mostly in the 1980's

    The picture attached is of a bi-metal coin given to me by Richard Lobel when he visited my house in South Africa. I have only ever seen two of them around so must assume there is a low mintage. Perhaps 10? Not sure and Richard remains silent to my inquiry.

    58fdd0c2b2fc6_bi-metalEdwardVIIIobv.JPG.bdf6ce0cb241dd055fa17fa56bcda724.JPG

  8. chris

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    mean s&w are pedigree and philly the standard if no mint mark

  9. I'm an avid fan of the American Silver Eagles.  I take pride in maintaining a 100% NGC collection.  I may not be the highest ranked but I have all of them, varieties included.  I'm just wondering where, from April 10, 2017 to April 16, 2016, a mysterious 2016(S) Minted in San Francisco variety was added?  I've never seen one listed for sale and there is no population report available.  It's second quarter 2017, they didn't just mint them.  Where's this mysterious coin?  I notice there is now a spot for the 2017(S) Minted in San Francisco variety so I expect it will be issued sometime this year (but, why have a slot for a non-issued coin?) and will be on the look for it.  The 2017S PF slot is now available as the coin was released recently and I already have my coin ordered for it.  I missed out on the unlimited purchase quantity available from the mint because the big companies bought all of them in 2 minutes.  I would welcome a reply from NGC as to how these mysterious slots came from.

  10. Stack's Bowers conducted the auctions associated with the recent Baltimore show, including internet-only sessions after the show. I won three lots (six coins) from one of those internet-only sessions. One lot was a decent circulated 1844-O placeholder for my collection of half dimes. A second lot consisted of four half dimes, the first of which was the one I wanted - an AU 1842 with reverse die cracks. I will probably write something about those two lots in future journals.

    The topic for now is the third lot I won. It is an 1848 "medium date" half dime. What caught my eye is that the date is noticeably farther to the right than on other 1848 half dimes. I looked for info, but neither Valentine (1931) nor Blythe (1992) mention it. The newer book by Bowers (2016) says only a few examples are known. The variety is discussed in a couple short Gobrecht Journal articles from 1993, where discovery credit is given to Neil (1927).

    I was not specifically aware of the "date far right" variety of 1848 half dimes when I first saw the photo of my new coin. But I have been looking carefully at Liberty Seated half dimes for some time now. And when something catches my attention, I check it out. In this case, I noticed what appears still to be a rare variety.

    The auction session occurred when I was on vacation several time zones west. Before the trip, I wasn't sure I'd be able to bid live, so I entered an absentee bid. Because the coin is a rare variety in a series that is not (yet) especially popular, I had no idea what to expect to have to pay to get it. The coin is in a PCGS AU53 holder. I bid about four times the FMV for a garden variety 1848 half dime. While on vacation, I received email notification that I had won it - for garden variety price! Apparently no one else noticed or cared that it was an unusual variety.

    So this is another case of finding something interesting and rare for regular price. More such things are certainly out there. If you learn about the things you collect and have the time to look, you can find things like this too. It has been a lot of fun for me...

     

    Alan

    1848 V-9 P53 Obv 600.JPG

    1848 V-9 P53 Rev 600.JPG

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    Friends,

     As I was really thinking of getting away from the state quarter series I did decide to do another submission on the quest. A little surprised on the conflicts needed to enter this journal but I see things getting rougher as time passes. Anyway -- seeing that our journals are no longer part of our member page I have a hard time thinking that all is so well with NGC!! This is definitely going to be a rough ride!!  I will renew my membership in a month and try a few submissions.

     Hope things get better!!!

    Rick 

  11. This is related to Hawaii !!!

    NOTE: You can tell the writing style difference of an author's journal entry  by the subject matter. On one hand you get regurgitation of previously documented information or what one owns. It's OK, but not exciting or groundbreaking. On the other hand you get thought provoking or I did not know this with a dumbfoundedness result. I hope I'm in the later category.

    Bernard von NotHaus was one of the co-founders of The Hawaiian Mint, which evolved into the Royal Hawaiian Mint, and he got into a heap of trouble with the US Government with his National Organization For the Repeal of the Federal Reserve Act (NORFED) coinage and currency.

    As a Hawaiiana numismatist, I must cover all numismatic aspects related to the Hawaiian Islands. The original NORFED Liberty dollars is such a coin. It's listed in World Price Guide at the NGC website:

    https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/united-states-10-liberty-dollars-x-201-1998-cuid-1075971-duid-1633923

    Waifs in Gold Boots, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, was created by the Royal Hawaiian Mint to document their issues. This spreadsheet was in the public domain at one point. Anyway, listed in this spreadsheet are three design elements that tell the story of the 1998 NORFED Libery dollar.

    wigb.thumb.jpg.0a782c1a94fbdb7eb4afff5db0756275.jpg

    This is a must have reference for Hawaiiana numismatist. Note the mintage (column J) and other key numismatic information!

    The image below is a visual of my original research finding. (I used a silver specimen of the 1975 Kamehameha issue with the "EARTH" design)

    norfeddesign.thumb.jpg.9a54bf817670a6635366ec00512f3faa.jpg

    As you can plainly see, the incorporation of design elements to form the original 1998 NORFED Liberty dollar came from previous issues of the The Hawaiian Mint/Royal Hawaiian Mint.

    This research would make a splendid exhibit, along with the controversy of this first 1998 NORFED issue.

    I was in a state of dumbfoundedness when I first discovered this and the first to document this find in my personal blog a few years ago.

    Finally, the mintage of the 1998 Liberty Dollar X# 201 is 150 specimens (which is not documented anywhere , except in  Waifs in Gold Boots).

     

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    Well My gut feel on the S mint Proof Silver Eagle would sell out fast.

     

    But I got to say it sold out faster than even than my assumptions. I logged on early at 11:30 made sure my log in and credit card was up to date. All of this prep helped me out because I had my order confirmed within 30 seconds. I feel the mint kind a blew it They release a popular coin, the 2nd lowest mintage of all time for the series and they didn't put a order limit on it.  Why would they do this? It motivated the dealers to scarf them up at a record pace! It also blocked a lot of the collectors from adding one to their personal collections. I own a complete set of Proof silver eagles and knew the hype would explode.  

     

    It really was a bit of a secret that the Congratulations Set 2017 would have a Sanfrancisco minted silver eagle,  But you would learn this if you were subscribed to mint blogs or checked coin  world weekly?  So what are the opinions of the collectors, do you feel the mint left most of us high and dry?

     

    It even appears that even NGC was caught by surprise. Because the default trolley label won't be available until April 19th.

     

    2017_S_Eagle_S1_Congrats set.jpeg

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    When I arrived home today I noticed a thick large padded envelope sitting on the kitchen table that my wife brought in sometime today from the mail box and it was from NGC and thinking what can this be and to my delight it was a plague with my Registry award for my Icelandic Kingdom Era Collection. Was not expecting this at all, maybe a paper certificate.  Thank You NGC for this wonderful plaque and I will proudly display it in my home.    

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    Chris B
    Latest Entry

    I have been collecting my whole life. My collection has taken many wandering paths to arrive where it is today. For years I built sets of U.S coins because that is what I thought you were supposed to do. The few dealers that I had access to (pre-internet) had no interest in foreign coins or really anything that they didn't have. In fact they tried to steer me away from anything other than US coins. They lead me to believe that world coins were junk and not worthy of being collected seriously.

    In recent years I have had my eyes opened. It started when I got bored with the coins in my collection. I decided I wanted to build a set of large cents by date. That was quite an eye opener. This set is still a work in progress and will never be truly complete. Large cents introduced me to collecting by die varieties. I know, not my original intention, but there has been so much research done on these that it is a natural progression. I fell in love hard with my large cents but as the set grew the pieces needed became increasing pricey so I started looking for alternatives to our large cents.

    When I first started dabbling with world coins I kept hearing in my head all the reasons I have been given not to do this. Larger world coins were my first interest. There are so many different examples in all price ranges. My favorites are from the 1700's and 1800's but I do not limit myself to these areas.

    As I said my collection has and still takes a meandering path. My feeling is that you shouldn't avoid an item simply because it doesn't fit in your collection. I have said many times, buy a coin you like and if it doesn't go up in value you will still have something you like. This goes against the advice of a lot of well known collectors. They say you should be more focused. Sorry, to me focused is boring. I am excited to spend time with my collection as often as possible. Collect in a way that excites you, whatever that may be. Don't let anybody tell you what you should like and how to collect.

    Photos:

    1) German States 1705 2/3 Thaler NGC XF45 ex Eric Newman

    2) Angola 1814 Macuta NGC MS62BN

    Ger170501.jpg

    Ang181401.jpg

  12. I was trying out my new book I got today, "COINS OF ENGLAND & THE UNITED KINGDOM" put out by SPINK, and I am having a hard time understanding its reference to a coin that I'm realizing that I know very little about.  I have a 1849 Florin and I thought that only 48'S & 49's were the "godless" type A.  But in my new book it looks like they can also be the "gothic" type B.  Can anyone shine some light on this?

    20170401_191554-1.jpg

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    Does anyone know what the current modern turn around times are?  Thank you.

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    My intention in writing this entry is not to come across as an advertisement because that is my last intention (you can check out my registry sets right here on the site). In all honesty, I want to share the following information for fellow collectors who find themselves in the exact position I was in merely a month ago.

    In saying that, over the years, my collection has grown to be quite valuable. I take pride in the work I have put into my collection, as I have dedicated years of my life to the hobby. As time progressed, I started thinking more and more about protecting my collection. I do not necessarily see my collection as an investment since I collect for sheer love of the hobby, but I knew it would have been naive to not at least attempt seeking some type of insurance that went beyond just a safe.

    This leads me to my ultimate topic I wish to discuss. Currently, all my coins are housed in pretty sturdy safes; nevertheless, a safe only goes so far. A good friend of mine is in the insurance industry here in Colorado so I thought I would approach her about what options I might have in insuring my collection.

    She took on the task and spent a great deal of time and work trying to find a company that would take on the risk and provide a policy that would insure the full value of my collection. Eventually, she found a great company that specializes in insuring coins. So, what are some of the specs that go along with such? Well, for those of you that find yourselves in the position I was in, I have proof-of-purchase for the majority of all my coin purchases, an inventory list, they're housed in safes and I was able to come up with a ball-park estimate of the collection's value. With these details alone, my friend was able to get me a great policy. They insured my entire collection for its full value. A few perks included in the plan is coins that are shipped for grading are automatically covered under the policy. Additionally, the plan includes a 1% increase every month for the total value of the collection which allows for the appreciation of my coins and the addition of new coins (if I were to get a really expensive piece, I could always change the total value of my policy beyond the 1% that's already included). If I were to ever experience a loss (theft, fire, flood, etc.), the company would cut me a check for the value of the coins lost.

    The one caveat in all this is she is licensed in Colorado. As a result of this, if you're interested in insuring your collection, you would need to either be a resident or living in the state of Colorado. Nevertheless, once the plan went into effect, it was almost as though I felt a weight lifted off my shoulders. I am aware that every coin is unique and could never be replaced, even with a check. However, knowing they're now insured really gives me a sense of security and pride. I was shocked by how low the annual premium was and how understanding the numismatic insurance company was regarding the hobby, in general.

    So, if any of you are either living in or a resident of Colorado and are interested in insuring your collection, shoot me an email and I will provide the contact information for my agent. She's talented, smart and looks out for the best interest of her clients while focusing on finding them the most affordable plan that meets their standards and goals for a collecting policy. If you don't like it, there's no pressure to commit. Nonetheless, if you're interested to simply know what's out there regarding the options of insuring your collection, I highly suggest you give her a ring. I have found, especially in this hobby, being informed goes a long way.

     

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    And why does Heritage Auctions put them in their own category?

    Before they became a US territory in 1900, the islands of Hawaii had been unified into a kingdom that existed for nearly a century. The Kingdom of Hawaii issued their own coinage, cents in 1847 and a series of silver coins in 1883. The cents were struck by a private firm in Massachusetts and the silver dimes, quarters, halves and dollars were designed by Charles Barber and were produced at the San Francisco Mint. These issues are what I consider to be the coins of Hawaii. 

    Even though Hawaii is now a US state, I think of the coins of Hawaii as "world" coins and would expect to see them in world coin auctions just as I expect to see the coins of Puerto Rico and the coins of the Philippines (although I admit the argument for including the US produced coins of the Philippines in US coin auctions is compelling). However, if you browse a Heritage world coin auction you will typically see the top categories as Ancient coins, World coins and Coins of Hawaii. I don't have an answer for why they have their own category but I imagine it has to do with bidding action.

    I have gotten used to seeing the coins of Hawaii in their own Heritage category but lately I have observed a trend that I personally do not care for. Within the Coins of Hawaii category, Heritage has started to include bullion "medals", with Hawaiian themes issued by a company calling themselves the Royal Hawaiian Mint. Some of these may have a connection to a State of Hawaii government office but I believe the majority are strictly private issues. Now there's nothing wrong with collecting exonumia; I just find their placement in the same category to be potentially confusing. 

    Now that you know a bit of the history of the official coins of the Kingdom of Hawaii, please understand the difference when you come across a Hawaiian themed medal, regardless how "royal" it seems.

    Here's my example of the silver dollar (akahi dala).

    ~jack 

    http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/usercontent/images/journals/
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    And I bet you are wondering where to begin. Each user may create a journal and add multiple entries to it.

    Create your Journal by following these steps:

    Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

     

    1 choose journals from browse menu.jpg

     

     

     Click Create a Journal

    2 click Create a Journal.jpg

     

     

    Name your journal, add a description, add a photo and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

     

    3 name the blog and add description.jpg3a name the blog and add description.jpg

     

     

     

     

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