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      Try the new NGC Journals!   03/22/2017

      NGC has launched a new and improved NGC Journals! Available on NGCcoin.com, the new NGC Journals improves upon the popular platform to write blogs and discuss them with other members. The new NGC Journals has an improved design that makes it significantly easier to post and read journals from any device, including smartphones and tablets. Adding images has been made much simpler, and the NGC Journals now give users the ability to create polls and "like" other entries. A popular feature of the old NGC Journals was the ability to open an entry to comments from other users. This feature has been retained and enhanced — users can now comment on the same page as the original Journal entry, creating a seamless experience. Best of all, the same login can be used to post Journals, make comments and access the other features of the NGC website. Old NGC Journals entries will be migrated to the new NGC Journals soon. In the meantime, users can make posts to the new NGC Journals. To get started, create a Journal and make an entry. Unlike the old NGC Journals, you create a single Journal and then add new entries to it. Your Journal can be customized with a cover photo, and you can choose to make it available to all users or only to the users that you select. You can also choose to receive notifications whenever people comment on one of your entries. Scroll below for helpful tips on using the new NGC Journals or go to the new NGC Journals now >   Instructions / Tips To get started, you must first create your Journal and then you can add entries to that Journal. Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

        Click Create a Journal

        Name your journal, add a description, add a photo, and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

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        Commenting on another user's Journal is easy. After selecting a journal to read, scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the field where you may enter your comments and see the comments others have posted.

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  1. 1 and 7 in the date can be seen as repunched on the 1997 Princess Kaiulani 1/10 oz gold Hapaumi. This is the second repunched date I found in the Princess Kaiulani issues by the Royal Hawaiian Mint.

    My previous find was the 1996 Princess Kaiulani 1/4 oz gold Hapaha.

     

    rd1.jpg

    1997.jpg

    rd.jpg

    kerror1.jpg

  2. So far, starting with James II in 1685, Ive posted examples of official Coronation Medals of the monarchs of England and Great Britain.

    Now, we come to Victoria, who came to the throne as a teenager and gave her name to an age, when the British empire was at its peak and when the sun never set on it, as its possessions circled the planet. Britain was indeed the superpower of most of the Victorian Age.

    This piece is the most recent acquisition and was graded as an MS 64. I thought a nice Victoria medal would be an easier one to get but it turned out to be one of the harder ones.

    Again , the design and engraving are in my opinion superior to most coins, but beautiful coins were produced during this reign as well, notably the Gothic Florins and Crowns.

     

    Victoria Coronation Medal, Obverse.jpg

  3. Rmw,

    Like I said in my past post I have had 5 mis-labeling issues in the past 4 orders. That's not saying anything about the 10 or so before that.

    I have added a pic of two coins that were in the same order as the turned around maundy coins. NGC labeled both these coins 1960 Shilling Scottish Crest. Can you find the screw up? It's kind of like "where's Waldo", but A LOT EASIER!

    Let me know if you can beat the pros.

    20170618_125726.jpg

  4. Re previous entry - I see a posting was made Wednesday regarding tie breakers.

    Seems counter to the original announcement, but so be it.

  5. jto

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    The "journals" are worse not better.  The registry is also worse and I have cut my time there by 80% (maybe a good thing?)  NGC has taken the "high road" out of town and left us, the collectors, behind.  Why do I have to go to page 4 to find my U.S. coins?  The time is ripe for a Third, Third party to open a user friendly Registry for us "the collector" that serve as the fuel for the hobby.  Maybe the ANA, hint , hint...

    A good registry is like a virtual Dansco or Whitman album, with holes to fill and eventually the joy of completing a set.  This is where NGC had a huge advantage toward participation.  Most serious collector have a mix of PCGS and NGC.  In auctions of US coins, currently, the ratio of PCGS coins to NGC is about 3 to 4 to 1 .  For world coin auctions it is reversed with NGC dominating by up to 10:1. That maybe why NGC is putting the world coins in front of U.S. on their Registry.   Is NGC giving up on the U.S. market?

    NGC IF YOU IGNORE U.S. COLLECTORS WE WILL GO AWAY!!!

    Here is what I see as a solution, after having several PCGS coins returned that would not cross ( AFTER NGC GOT THE GRADING FEE) I had an idea.  If NGC is so much purer and dedicated to truth and honesty then here is an idea:

    Submit PCGS coins to NGC to cross (full fee) or just to grade (like the GSA coins.)  These coins have no guarantee from NGC if they are left in the PCGS holder, they just get a grade.  Because they are still in the PCGS holder they:

    1) Don't get included in the NGC population report

    2) The NGC grade is affixed to the PCGS holder so the coin can be used in the NGC registry

    3) NGC has no liability as they do not provide a guarantee (as stated in the small print by NGC on both GSA and Ancient coins)

    4) If the coin is sent in for only an NGC grade but not gross over (the GSA treatment by request) the fee could be reduced (again NGC is not providing a guarantee)

    (About the guarantee, most of you already know all of this but for those that don't, here it is.)The guarantee is what you pay for.  Yes they are guaranteeing the grade in an NGC holder but the big money is in the guarantee the the coin is not a counterfeit.  PCGS has certified at least 2 counterfeit coins that they placed into their holders within the last two years.   If a person buys that coin, in the original PCGS holder without evidence of tampering, they can go to PCGS and expect to be reimbursed for their loss (the fair market value of the coin.)  The grade guarantee is much more difficult to "prove" unless it is a "Red" copper that has turned brown, which is why they don't guarantee color on copper anymore.

    This would bring me back to NGC and I would be willing to pay to get my PCGS coins on the NGC registry (which I liked better before).

    But it is hard to look at a Liberty V in a PCGS MS-66 holder that NGC would not cross and then resubmit to cross at MS-65 or 64,  Would you do it?

     

    John

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    The price gods have smiled on me once again. I got another 70 for my modern half dollar commemorative collection. It's a 1995-S Basketball graded at MS70. It's a great strike and the detailing is very nice. I got it for a good price. You can now bye some of these half commem's for less that fifty bucks per coin.

    Displaying slabs is harder to do. Looking through a binder with great looking raw coins is nice and it's convenient. I don't think I'll sell my raw ones as they look so nice in the binders. I have seen some "slab notebooks" that look nice and each display page has pockets to display 9 on a page.

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    Six Mile Rick
    Latest Entry

    Well --- Dena has deleted my Rick's Keepers member page and added everything to my Six Mile Rick member page. Still I am Rick's Keepers in chat log in.  What a STRUGGLE!!

    Six Mile Rick

  6. There are few things in numismatics that I enjoy more than strong allegories on coins and medals. Where the allegory is unknown, I endeavor to decipher it within the historical context of the numismatic piece. Because of this love I created two NGC custom sets, “Inspirational Ladies” and “The Use of Seated Imagery in Numismatics.” Researching the coins and medals contained in these two sets has given me many hours of enjoyment!

    One coin that I recently acquired illustrating a strong allegory is the 2017 Canadian .9999 Fine Silver $100 Coin, “Juventas et Patrius Vigor” (Latin for “Youth and Patriotic Strength”), 1867 Confederation Medal. This coin is 76.25 mm in diameter and weighs 10 oz. The mintage is 1000 and my coin’s serial number is 321/1000. This year Canada is celebrating their 150th anniversary of confederation. Marking the occasion, Canada is releasing a number of commemorative coins.

    The obverse of this massive coin features an 1867 profile bust of Queen Victoria and a current profile of Queen Elizabeth II along with their corresponding crowned monograms. The obverse represents Queen Victoria as the British queen in power at the time of confederation in 1867 and the current queen, Queen Elizabeth II.

    Faithfully reproduced, the reverse of this coin is modeled from the dies of the original 76.5 mm, 1867 Canadian Confederation Medal. Issued with Queen Victoria’s approval, this medal was minted in silver and bronze. It was awarded to persons of merit for their service to Canada. The original mintages are one gold medal presented to Queen Victoria, fifty silver medals, and five hundred bronze medals. The designers of this medal were brothers JS and AB Wyon. These medals seldom appear on the open market and are quite expensive. I found an auction record for a beautiful original silver medal selling at $2750.00 CAD + $550 buyers premium on 7/13/11 ( http://www.icollector.com/1867-Canadian-Confederation-Silver-Medal_i10734270 ). I also found the record of a bronze medal that sold for $800 USD ( https://www.emedals.com/a-rare-confederation-commemorative-table-medal-1867-c0881 ).

    The reverse features Britannia representing the UK, seated and holding a scroll on which is written “Confederation.” The lion resting its head on Britannia’s lap is reminiscent of “Una and the Lion” from Spenser's “The Faerie Queene.” Around Britannia and idealizing the motto “Youth and Patriotic Strength” are four young maidens representing the four original provinces of Canada; Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick . Ontario is holding a sickle and sheaf representing agriculture. Holding a canoe paddle is Quebec representing commerce. In Nova Scotia’s hand is a shovel representing mining. Finally, New Brunswick is holding an ax to represent forestry. I gleaned much of the information for this post from the following website,  http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/honours-history-awards/conf-medal.page . Here you will also find a lot of interesting facts about the original medal that I had not mentioned in this post. Until next time, happy collecting! Gary.

    2017_Canada_100_Dollars.jpg

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    Daniel McMunn
    Latest Entry

    It is time for me to comment on the Journals. The Journals are not" New and Improved" but" New and Confused". Prolific use of the journals has stopped. The computer" Geeks" have missed the concept of "If it ain't   Broke Don't Fix It". The Journal is not user friendly. It is hard on the eyes. Does not allow easy flow of words. Does not allow a Quick Read and a Quick Comment. Formatted as such, fewer collectors frequent the site. I can only conclude the Journal was changed to save server space. If this is so, why not eliminate it altogether? 

  7. JRs Coins

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    Mint issues statement on “erroneous” branch-mint information on ASE coins

    May 26, 2017 By Mint News Blog

    Now even the mint admits it does not know where they think they minted the silver eagles.  It's about time for the TPGs to simply label the coin in front of them.  If there is no mint mark, leave it at that, don't suggest  or imply one.  It is pretty costly to attempt to complete a set as it is without phony labeled coins to add to the mix.

     

  8. One thing I feel that is needed in coinage is a uniformity on deciding what is an obverse and what is a reverse. Almost all US coinage is quite simple as we declare that the side with the Bust or Lady Liberty is usually the obverse. There are some instances with modern and classic commemorative issues where there remains inconsistency with opinions on which is the obverse and which the reverse.

    Things are far less clear with world coins. Many nations don't use busts at all but have National Shields, emblems or simply have variance on both sides with all issues. It remains often unclear which is considered the obverse. Is it determined by the side with the nation's name? How about the side with the year/date on it?

    The grading services seem to have no idea either- or maybe they just don't place any priority or are unconcerned with the issue. However collectors seem to have a certain inherent desire for uniformity or order in our collections.It seems as if the obverse should always be facing forward on the same side of the coin as the label, be it the Queen's bust, Liberty in one of her depictions or a former POTUS. Yet we don't even see this simple consistency. I have seen PCGS deliberately invert the reverse onto the label side simply because the reverse had some nice toning on it and the TPG decided of their own volition to place the coin in encapsulation with "reverse side up."

    I have a simple Canadian 10c Proof issue set. The Queen's bust in all its aging glory is depicted on the obverse of all 43 issued coins and my set is 100% complete, yet 11 of my 43 coins have the reverse on the label side and 32 of the coins with the Queen's bust on the label side. I do notice a trend though. Six of the coins with the Bluenose Schooner on the label side are perfect 70's...4 of the other 5 are commem issues with the commemorated event on the label side ( and one PF69UCAM just seems to be reversed for no reason at all, no matter how I try and reach.)

    Oh well, not the biggest of issues unless the coins in their slabs are meant for some type of display or group encasing. We can always just flip the coin over in-hand if we want to see the other side...

    What brought this about is the 2 sets I just finished--each having 1 coin inexplicably reversed with the obverse of the coin on the back of the slab. Am I the only one this happens to or has nobody else noticed this randomness? As we always say, it's about the coin and not the holder so que sera sera........

    Happy Hunting everyone

     

    DSC02381.jpg

    DSC02380.jpg

  9. Obviously, NGC doesn't have an all inclusive Silver Eagles competitive set available.  According to Maribeth Bouche of NGC, "Hello, Thank you for the feedback.  The 2013 SP Enhanced finish is a special strike and was inadvertently allowed in the MS ad Proof sets."

    This coin doesn't rate for the Silver Eagles, 1986-Date, Mint State and Proof (Incl. Varieties) competitive set but is good enough for the Silver Eagles, 1986-Date, Bullion Issues competitive set.                                                                   

    This doesn't make any sense.  The are only 281K of this coin available and the reverse proof is part of the complete set but the enhanced finish isn't?  A (P), (S), (W) implied mint mark is a variety but the enhanced finish isn't?  Hey, everybody, you're 2013W SP coin only rates as common bullion by NGC.  Ok, then.  I don't argue with experts.  NGC has perverted numismatics with their varieties.  Watch out, next thing you know, it will be the individual labels you have to collect as these are "varieties".    

      I'm not going to play this game with them anymore.  I've spent too much time and money building a 100% complete set for the issuing company (NGC) not allow recognition.  I'm not renewing my membership and stop my upgrading process.  I'll be selling my entire NGC collection is anyone is interested (serious offers only)  I'm getting away from them.

     

     

     

     

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    There are no bullion coins minted in San Francisco......period.

    They mint them at West Point and fly them to California.

    Please remove it. It is as phony as the "minted at" coins we "had" to have and paid a premium for.

    NGC pulled the last round of Eagles because it cannot substantiated, by fact, where the coins are minted.

    West Point does bullion.

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  10. Amarillo1

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    amarillo1
    Latest Entry

    :roflmao:Hi, can any please help me to fine the pop list. Since that change this I can not fine any thing, I only hope that I can fine your Nasser. Thanks don

  11. Where can I find Following/Follow

  12.  
    Ancient Greece (Pontos, Amisos): silver drachm or siglos featuring Hera and owl, ca. late 5th to 4th century BC
    full?d=1493453232
    (Presently raw)
     
    Ancient Greece (Kingdom of Macedon), silver "Mercenaries" drachm of King Perseus, ca. 175-170 BC
    full?d=1482831030
    (NGC Ch MS; Strike 5/5, Surface 5/5)
     
    Ancient Roman Republic: silver denarius of moneyer L. Furius Brocchus, ca. 63 BC
    full?d=1493450822
    (NGC Ch VF; Strike 5/5, Surface 4/5)
     
    Ancient Roman Empire: silver "Capricorn" denarius of Vespasian, struck by Titus ca. 80-81 AD
    full?d=1482832082
    (Presently raw)
     
    Ancient Roman Empire: silver denarius of Septimius Severus, "Dea Caelestis" type, ca. 193-211 AD
    full?d=1482832564
    (NGC Ch AU; Strike 4/5, Surface 4/5)
     
    Ancient Byzantine Empire: gold tremissis of Justinian I, ca. 527-565 AD
    full?d=1482832977
    (NGC MS; Strike 5/5, Surface 4/5, "wrinkled")
     
    England (Anglo-Saxon): silver penny of Aethelred II, struck ca. 997-1003 AD
    full?d=1482835278
    (PCGS MS63)
     
    Netherlands (Gelderland): "St. John" type goldgulden (florin) of Arnold van Egmond, ca. 1423-1472
    full?d=1482837861
    (PCGS Genuine; XF details, "Filed Rims")
     
    Belgium (Brabant): gold florin (Carolus d’or) of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, ca. 1521-1545
    full?d=1482838290
    (Presently raw)
     
    German States (Teutonic Order): silver 1/4-thaler of Grand Master Maximilian of Austria, ca. 1615
    full?d=1483098655
    (PCGS XF45)
     
    Great Britain: silver "South Sea Company" shilling of George I, 1723
    full?d=1482840026
    (PCGS MS63+, formerly NGC MS64)
     
    Belgium (Austrian Netherlands): copper 2 liards (2 Oorden), Insurrection coinage, 1790
    full?d=1482841679
    (NGC MS63 BN)
     
    Great Britain: gilt copper proof halfpenny of George III, Soho Mint, 1806
    full?d=1482843904
    (PCGS PR65 DCAM, formerly NGC PR64 CAM)
     
    Great Britain: silver shilling of George IV, off-center mint error, ca. 1826-1829
    full?d=1482845935
    (PCGS XF40)
     
    United States: gold 5-dollar half-eagle, Liberty Head type, 1842-D (small date)
    full?d=1482845081
    (PCGS VF30; CAC)
     
    Liberia: proof copper cent, 1847
    full?d=1482847004
    (PCGS PR65 BN)
     
    France: copper specimen striking of a 10-centime pattern (essai), 1848
    full?d=1482847616
    (PCGS SP65 RB)
     
    United States: bronze Civil War token, "Our Little Monitor" type, 1863
    USA-MonitorCWT-1863-016565-coin-800x500.
    (NGC MS65 BN)
     
    United States: proof copper-nickel 3-cent piece, Liberty head type, 1888
    USA-3cN-1888-057500-coin-800x500.jpg
    (PCGS PR65 CAM)
     
    Great Britain: gold half-sovereign of Queen Victoria, 1901, from the Terner Collection
    GB-HalfSov-1901-029500-coin-800x500.jpg
    (PCGS MS64)
     
     
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    36-pl-western-fort-worth-herd-fort-worth-cvb.jpg

    Hello everyone,

     

    I spent last Saturday afternoon & evening using my new camera and copy stand to take pictures of my Morgan Dollar Collection so that I could share them with the community. They are in my collection named Hell's Half Acre Hoard of Morgan Dollars just like the post title if you would like to see them. The camera is really not a professional one but I think it did a pretty good job for a point and click. I would recommend getting a copy stand for anyone who is wanting to take pictures of their collection to share with the group or just for insurance purposes. I was just using the camera on the IPhone with no stand but as you can guess the results weren't very good. The Stand lets me get a repeatable set up and results.

     

    Photo Jan 22, 11 39 47 AM.jpg

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    Richard Lobel minted many Edward VIII coinage  - mostly in the 1980's

    The picture attached is of a bi-metal coin given to me by Richard Lobel when he visited my house in South Africa. I have only ever seen two of them around so must assume there is a low mintage. Perhaps 10? Not sure and Richard remains silent to my inquiry.

    58fdd0c2b2fc6_bi-metalEdwardVIIIobv.JPG.bdf6ce0cb241dd055fa17fa56bcda724.JPG

  13. chris

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    mean s&w are pedigree and philly the standard if no mint mark

  14. Stack's Bowers conducted the auctions associated with the recent Baltimore show, including internet-only sessions after the show. I won three lots (six coins) from one of those internet-only sessions. One lot was a decent circulated 1844-O placeholder for my collection of half dimes. A second lot consisted of four half dimes, the first of which was the one I wanted - an AU 1842 with reverse die cracks. I will probably write something about those two lots in future journals.

    The topic for now is the third lot I won. It is an 1848 "medium date" half dime. What caught my eye is that the date is noticeably farther to the right than on other 1848 half dimes. I looked for info, but neither Valentine (1931) nor Blythe (1992) mention it. The newer book by Bowers (2016) says only a few examples are known. The variety is discussed in a couple short Gobrecht Journal articles from 1993, where discovery credit is given to Neil (1927).

    I was not specifically aware of the "date far right" variety of 1848 half dimes when I first saw the photo of my new coin. But I have been looking carefully at Liberty Seated half dimes for some time now. And when something catches my attention, I check it out. In this case, I noticed what appears still to be a rare variety.

    The auction session occurred when I was on vacation several time zones west. Before the trip, I wasn't sure I'd be able to bid live, so I entered an absentee bid. Because the coin is a rare variety in a series that is not (yet) especially popular, I had no idea what to expect to have to pay to get it. The coin is in a PCGS AU53 holder. I bid about four times the FMV for a garden variety 1848 half dime. While on vacation, I received email notification that I had won it - for garden variety price! Apparently no one else noticed or cared that it was an unusual variety.

    So this is another case of finding something interesting and rare for regular price. More such things are certainly out there. If you learn about the things you collect and have the time to look, you can find things like this too. It has been a lot of fun for me...

     

    Alan

    1848 V-9 P53 Obv 600.JPG

    1848 V-9 P53 Rev 600.JPG

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    Friends,

     As I was really thinking of getting away from the state quarter series I did decide to do another submission on the quest. A little surprised on the conflicts needed to enter this journal but I see things getting rougher as time passes. Anyway -- seeing that our journals are no longer part of our member page I have a hard time thinking that all is so well with NGC!! This is definitely going to be a rough ride!!  I will renew my membership in a month and try a few submissions.

     Hope things get better!!!

    Rick 

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    Well My gut feel on the S mint Proof Silver Eagle would sell out fast.

     

    But I got to say it sold out faster than even than my assumptions. I logged on early at 11:30 made sure my log in and credit card was up to date. All of this prep helped me out because I had my order confirmed within 30 seconds. I feel the mint kind a blew it They release a popular coin, the 2nd lowest mintage of all time for the series and they didn't put a order limit on it.  Why would they do this? It motivated the dealers to scarf them up at a record pace! It also blocked a lot of the collectors from adding one to their personal collections. I own a complete set of Proof silver eagles and knew the hype would explode.  

     

    It really was a bit of a secret that the Congratulations Set 2017 would have a Sanfrancisco minted silver eagle,  But you would learn this if you were subscribed to mint blogs or checked coin  world weekly?  So what are the opinions of the collectors, do you feel the mint left most of us high and dry?

     

    It even appears that even NGC was caught by surprise. Because the default trolley label won't be available until April 19th.

     

    2017_S_Eagle_S1_Congrats set.jpeg

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    When I arrived home today I noticed a thick large padded envelope sitting on the kitchen table that my wife brought in sometime today from the mail box and it was from NGC and thinking what can this be and to my delight it was a plague with my Registry award for my Icelandic Kingdom Era Collection. Was not expecting this at all, maybe a paper certificate.  Thank You NGC for this wonderful plaque and I will proudly display it in my home.    

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    Chris B
    Latest Entry

    I have been collecting my whole life. My collection has taken many wandering paths to arrive where it is today. For years I built sets of U.S coins because that is what I thought you were supposed to do. The few dealers that I had access to (pre-internet) had no interest in foreign coins or really anything that they didn't have. In fact they tried to steer me away from anything other than US coins. They lead me to believe that world coins were junk and not worthy of being collected seriously.

    In recent years I have had my eyes opened. It started when I got bored with the coins in my collection. I decided I wanted to build a set of large cents by date. That was quite an eye opener. This set is still a work in progress and will never be truly complete. Large cents introduced me to collecting by die varieties. I know, not my original intention, but there has been so much research done on these that it is a natural progression. I fell in love hard with my large cents but as the set grew the pieces needed became increasing pricey so I started looking for alternatives to our large cents.

    When I first started dabbling with world coins I kept hearing in my head all the reasons I have been given not to do this. Larger world coins were my first interest. There are so many different examples in all price ranges. My favorites are from the 1700's and 1800's but I do not limit myself to these areas.

    As I said my collection has and still takes a meandering path. My feeling is that you shouldn't avoid an item simply because it doesn't fit in your collection. I have said many times, buy a coin you like and if it doesn't go up in value you will still have something you like. This goes against the advice of a lot of well known collectors. They say you should be more focused. Sorry, to me focused is boring. I am excited to spend time with my collection as often as possible. Collect in a way that excites you, whatever that may be. Don't let anybody tell you what you should like and how to collect.

    Photos:

    1) German States 1705 2/3 Thaler NGC XF45 ex Eric Newman

    2) Angola 1814 Macuta NGC MS62BN

    Ger170501.jpg

    Ang181401.jpg

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    Does anyone know what the current modern turn around times are?  Thank you.