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    • dena

      Try the new NGC Journals!   03/22/2017

      NGC has launched a new and improved NGC Journals! Available on NGCcoin.com, the new NGC Journals improves upon the popular platform to write blogs and discuss them with other members. The new NGC Journals has an improved design that makes it significantly easier to post and read journals from any device, including smartphones and tablets. Adding images has been made much simpler, and the NGC Journals now give users the ability to create polls and "like" other entries. A popular feature of the old NGC Journals was the ability to open an entry to comments from other users. This feature has been retained and enhanced — users can now comment on the same page as the original Journal entry, creating a seamless experience. Best of all, the same login can be used to post Journals, make comments and access the other features of the NGC website. Old NGC Journals entries will be migrated to the new NGC Journals soon. In the meantime, users can make posts to the new NGC Journals. To get started, create a Journal and make an entry. Unlike the old NGC Journals, you create a single Journal and then add new entries to it. Your Journal can be customized with a cover photo, and you can choose to make it available to all users or only to the users that you select. You can also choose to receive notifications whenever people comment on one of your entries. Scroll below for helpful tips on using the new NGC Journals or go to the new NGC Journals now >   Instructions / Tips To get started, you must first create your Journal and then you can add entries to that Journal. Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

        Click Create a Journal

        Name your journal, add a description, add a photo, and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

        Click Add Journal Entry to add a post to your journal

        Commenting on another user's Journal is easy. After selecting a journal to read, scroll to the bottom of the page where you will find the field where you may enter your comments and see the comments others have posted.

Journals

Our community journals

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    Does anyone know what the current modern turn around times are?  Thank you.

  1. Look at this on eBay http://www.ebay.com/itm/252830205616

    Testing out something new.  Trying to add a link to a coin I bought.

    RMW, if you see this then it worked. 

    This is a 1936 six pence.  Nothing special,  I'm just trying something new.

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    Chris B
    Latest Entry

    I appologize if this is showing up twice. Still trying to get used to the new journals.

    Anyone that knows me knows that I tend to collect nice circulated pieces. Despite that when you I see a coin almost 200 years old in almost perfect condition I have to take a second look.  The largest portion of my collection contains coins from the German States. The area of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel put out some fascinating pieces in a wide variety of designs. My favorites by far are the Wildman coins. This particular piece is a 24 Mariengroschen dated 1829. It is not the most interesting design from the area but it is well struck and graded NGC MS66. There were 2 different versions of this coin, this one has the "ZU BRAUNSCHW" legend.

    When I see a coin like this I always wonder why someone pulled it out of circulation and chose to keep it in virtually untouched condition. Although not unheard of finding these in mint state coins from this time period and geographical area is unusual. Typically they are found well circulated. Nicely struck pieces like this are also hard to come by.

    2880471_Full_Obv.jpg

    2880471_Full_Rev.jpg

  2. Here is a new purchase made today in England, a 1674 halfcrown, practically as struck. This is a well struck piece for the type with prooflike surfaces. 

    1674 halfcrown.jpg

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    My intention in writing this entry is not to come across as an advertisement because that is my last intention (you can check out my registry sets right here on the site). In all honesty, I want to share the following information for fellow collectors who find themselves in the exact position I was in merely a month ago.

    In saying that, over the years, my collection has grown to be quite valuable. I take pride in the work I have put into my collection, as I have dedicated years of my life to the hobby. As time progressed, I started thinking more and more about protecting my collection. I do not necessarily see my collection as an investment since I collect for sheer love of the hobby, but I knew it would have been naive to not at least attempt seeking some type of insurance that went beyond just a safe.

    This leads me to my ultimate topic I wish to discuss. Currently, all my coins are housed in pretty sturdy safes; nevertheless, a safe only goes so far. A good friend of mine is in the insurance industry here in Colorado so I thought I would approach her about what options I might have in insuring my collection.

    She took on the task and spent a great deal of time and work trying to find a company that would take on the risk and provide a policy that would insure the full value of my collection. Eventually, she found a great company that specializes in insuring coins. So, what are some of the specs that go along with such? Well, for those of you that find yourselves in the position I was in, I have proof-of-purchase for the majority of all my coin purchases, an inventory list, they're housed in safes and I was able to come up with a ball-park estimate of the collection's value. With these details alone, my friend was able to get me a great policy. They insured my entire collection for its full value. A few perks included in the plan is coins that are shipped for grading are automatically covered under the policy. Additionally, the plan includes a 1% increase every month for the total value of the collection which allows for the appreciation of my coins and the addition of new coins (if I were to get a really expensive piece, I could always change the total value of my policy beyond the 1% that's already included). If I were to ever experience a loss (theft, fire, flood, etc.), the company would cut me a check for the value of the coins lost.

    The one caveat in all this is she is licensed in Colorado. As a result of this, if you're interested in insuring your collection, you would need to either be a resident or living in the state of Colorado. Nevertheless, once the plan went into effect, it was almost as though I felt a weight lifted off my shoulders. I am aware that every coin is unique and could never be replaced, even with a check. However, knowing they're now insured really gives me a sense of security and pride. I was shocked by how low the annual premium was and how understanding the numismatic insurance company was regarding the hobby, in general.

    So, if any of you are either living in or a resident of Colorado and are interested in insuring your collection, shoot me an email and I will provide the contact information for my agent. She's talented, smart and looks out for the best interest of her clients while focusing on finding them the most affordable plan that meets their standards and goals for a collecting policy. If you don't like it, there's no pressure to commit. Nonetheless, if you're interested to simply know what's out there regarding the options of insuring your collection, I highly suggest you give her a ring. I have found, especially in this hobby, being informed goes a long way.

     

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    And why does Heritage Auctions put them in their own category?

    Before they became a US territory in 1900, the islands of Hawaii had been unified into a kingdom that existed for nearly a century. The Kingdom of Hawaii issued their own coinage, cents in 1847 and a series of silver coins in 1883. The cents were struck by a private firm in Massachusetts and the silver dimes, quarters, halves and dollars were designed by Charles Barber and were produced at the San Francisco Mint. These issues are what I consider to be the coins of Hawaii. 

    Even though Hawaii is now a US state, I think of the coins of Hawaii as "world" coins and would expect to see them in world coin auctions just as I expect to see the coins of Puerto Rico and the coins of the Philippines (although I admit the argument for including the US produced coins of the Philippines in US coin auctions is compelling). However, if you browse a Heritage world coin auction you will typically see the top categories as Ancient coins, World coins and Coins of Hawaii. I don't have an answer for why they have their own category but I imagine it has to do with bidding action.

    I have gotten used to seeing the coins of Hawaii in their own Heritage category but lately I have observed a trend that I personally do not care for. Within the Coins of Hawaii category, Heritage has started to include bullion "medals", with Hawaiian themes issued by a company calling themselves the Royal Hawaiian Mint. Some of these may have a connection to a State of Hawaii government office but I believe the majority are strictly private issues. Now there's nothing wrong with collecting exonumia; I just find their placement in the same category to be potentially confusing. 

    Now that you know a bit of the history of the official coins of the Kingdom of Hawaii, please understand the difference when you come across a Hawaiian themed medal, regardless how "royal" it seems.

    Here's my example of the silver dollar (akahi dala).

    ~jack 

    http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/usercontent/images/journals/
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    One might think that shifting gears and a different direction are synonymous. However, the truth is that though related, they are two separate actions. A different direction in that I will be liquidating a portion of my current collection to focus on another and shifting gears in that I will be buying fewer but higher quality coins to upgrade the remaining sets.

    All this started with my losing interest in collecting Morgan Dollars. A year or two into collecting Morgans, I got bored with them. With a goal of completing the 103 coin set I was buying coins at a break neck pace that focused on volume rather than quality. To regain interest I thought that all I needed was a break. Though I fully intended to resume purchasing Morgans and completing the set, the longer I was away the less likely it would be that I'd return. Truth is I never got back.

    After long and careful consideration, I decided to discontinue collecting Morgans and liquidate the bulk of my Morgan Dollar collection. All told, I will be selling 43 coins. I did not make this decision lightly as I have thought about it carefully for the better part of a year. Yet there are a number of things that led to this decision after going trailblazers for Morgans six to seven years ago when I started out only intending to complete a New Orleans Mint collection. (The decision to collect all the Morgans came after completing the New Orleans portion of the set.)

    While away from Morgans, I found myself drifting back to my boyhood roots, type and theme based collecting. I became fixated on completing my 7070 type set and working on my theme based seated imagery custom set. I started to buy the best type coins I could afford and since I was buying fewer coins, I could spend more. I've learned that when it comes to beauty there is nothing like a classic coin in a high state of preservation. These coins are not only more beautiful, they are more likely to hold their value as a highly desirable collector coin. Furthermore, as a person who also loves photography, I have learned that premium quality coins are definitely more photogenic!

    What then was the problem I had with Morgans that caused me to give up on them? I think that a collection of affordable quality coins in a complete Morgan Dollar set are a huge show stopper. Affordable coins are sometimes no higher than low MS grades and many are still lower. A VG 93-S will fetch more than $2000! Still I could live with a lower grade as long as it doesn't have distracting contact marks. Simply stated, most MS-62 to 64 Morgans have numerous and distracting contact marks.

    High grade Morgans are a thing of beauty. Most MS-65 and higher Morgans are a sight to behold and because of this I am keeping my 24 coin set of Morgans that grade MS-65 and higher. I also have this thing about Carson City, there is just something about Carson City that intrigues me. Therefore, I am also keeping my Carson City registry set. Additionally, I have six GSA pedigreed Carson City Dollars of which two are graded MS-65 (1882, 1883).

    Another factor in my decision is that I will be retiring in no more than six years. At that point my collecting activities will be severely curtailed. With this in mind I have targeted a number of coins in my type set to upgrade over the course of the next six years. It is also unlikely that I will be starting any new registry or custom sets but rather find other pieces to add to my custom sets like my Laura Gardin Fraser set.

    Another area of focus will be my gold type sets. Finding nice type-1 and type-2 double eagles has proven to be quite challenging because of the distracting contact marks found on most of these coins. Still after long searches I have managed to get an 1852 type-1 that at AU-55 is remarkably void of contact marks! For the type-2 I had to decide what level of contact marks is acceptable since it is nearly an impossible coin to find without them. In deciding my tolerance level I borrowed from a Bible passage which states that love covers over a multitude of sins. In relation to double eagles I found that luster covers over a multitude of dings, gashes, and abrasions. It doesn't literally mean that the contact marks are covered but that they are not as noticeable. All that said, I am still having a hard time finding a decent upgrade for my MS-62 type-3! Oh well, I am going to thoroughly enjoy the hunt in the few last years I have before I retire! Attached is a photo of the AU-58 type-2 that I found to be acceptable.
    Gary 

    http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/usercontent/images/journals/
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    It may be time to show some discipline and get things in order.

    I am not a procrastinator by nature. I am usually the polar opposite. In fact, if I am being honest in my self assessment, I am a bit compulsive with my desire for order in a universe ruled by the ceaseless tides of entropy.
    For example, if a bill arrives in the mail I will almost immediately pay it, write the date and amount on the invoice and then file it in the appropriate folder. I am never satisfied to rinse a plate and leave it in the sink when the dishwasher is but a few feet away. Of course I could never imagine folding all of my laundry and just piling it on top of the dresser like my kids most often did.
    My dad taught me a few invaluable lessons in the few years I had before he passed. One was that if you were going to do something, then do it right or to the best of your ability. Another was that if you start something, then you finish it. I guess this is where my need for orderliness comes from. 
    I seem to have lost my way with my coin "collection." For the most part I buy either graded coins that fill registry slots, some sets from the mint when I need 2 or 3 for different sets ( or when it's more financially sound to buy a 6 coin silver set for a few bucks more than the single coin) or single coins for custom sets or to send in for grading.
    It is this last part that has gotten WAY behind. Either out of sight/ out of mind is in effect or I am a closet hoarder ( just with really small objects like coins so I can still walk through my house)- whichever it is, it is time for some discipline to be exercised.
    I keep buying more coins for sets, not getting them graded and then looking for more coins. Then the funds for all of the grading becomes too daunting so I procrastinate more...a bad cycle to be stuck in for and orderly collector.
    Just looking into 2 coin cases that I acquired to protect raw coins until grading, I was surprised myself to see that I had pretty much filled up all of the various drawers with mint sets, proof sets, silver issues, themed coins and on and on--I really had no idea of the amount.
    So as I share this photo with you-and it is just PART of the raw coins I have set aside to be encapsulated, it is not to show off in any way, but instead to confess openly of my "acquisition issues." 
    After all, admitting you have a problem is the first step to recovery, right?

    PS: the first 15 have been decided--the final Bahamian 50c to complete that set, the final 4 Bahamian $2 coins with the flamingo at sunset, the Canada "alloy" silver coins from the 2014 and 2016 proof sets of 10c and $2 coins which will complete/update both of those 100% and the final 6 coins will be Bear themed coins for the granddaughter's bear coins collection. This is a step in the right direction to re-establishing order in my collecting I believe.
    PPS: thanks Dena 

    http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/usercontent/images/journals/

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    I should have noticed this before...

    When I started collecting half dimes several years ago, I was still working primarily on my large cent set. My idea with the half dimes was to start with the collector era proofs, 1858-1873. But I ended up getting hooked on the larger, business strike set of Liberty Seated Half Dimes, and only infrequently added to the set of proofs.

    Late last year, however, I did make one of those proof additions. It is a nice 1863 PR 66 Cameo, certified by PCGS - one of the last I got into the NGC registry. But there was something about it that I missed until just recently. My last two journals were about taking new pictures of my coins. The proof half dimes just had their turn. When examining the photos, I noticed something peculiar.

    Some background: Starting in 1871, a defect appears on half dimes: The top of the D in UNITED is broken. According to Valentine, this occurs in all but one variety of 1871 (P), and all Philadelphia and San Francisco half dimes of 1872 and 1873. So the D must have become defective in the hub, but only after at least one 1871 (P) and the 1871-S obverse dies were made.

    My 1863 proof half dime has the defective D. Judd lists patterns dated 1863 and 1864 that were probably struck in the early 1870s, consistent with use of the hub with the broken D. For 1863, only copper and aluminum patterns are listed, though Breen wrote that one silver example had been seen. My coin looks silver to me. I'll be having some more expert folks look at it in the near future.

    On the one hand, I'm a little embarrassed that I did not notice the broken D earlier, or, if I did, that I did not note that it "should not" be on a 1863 half dime. On the other hand, I am disappointed in PCGS (in this case) for missing it too. They are supposed to be experts, after all. (The certification is for a garden variety 1863 proof.) Either way, I am very happy to have a rare item!

    Alan 

    17901.JPG

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    And I bet you are wondering where to begin. Each user may create a journal and add multiple entries to it.

    Create your Journal by following these steps:

    Choose Journals from the Browse menu if you are not already on the Journals page

     

    1 choose journals from browse menu.jpg

     

     

     Click Create a Journal

    2 click Create a Journal.jpg

     

     

    Name your journal, add a description, add a photo and choose if you want all users to see your journal or if you would like it available to a specific audience only. Click Continue to move on to the next step where you can add you first entry!

     

    3 name the blog and add description.jpg3a name the blog and add description.jpg

     

     

     

     

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    How do you use the journals?

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