From the Grading Room: 1870 Judd-814 Pattern Half Dime

Posted on 3/13/2013

NGC has graded this remarkable coin PF 64 Cameo. It is the first and only Judd-814 pattern to be certified by a third-party grading company.

The Civil War resulted in the widespread hoarding of gold, silver and even copper coins. The shortage of copper coins was solved only when tens of millions of a lighter, bronze one cent coin were issued in 1864. Silver and gold coins remained scarce, however, in 1869 a new “Standard Silver” series, which would consist of smaller and lighter silver coins, was proposed.

The US Mint struck pattern Standard Silver coins in only three years: 1869, 1870 and 1871. The series includes dozens of distinct Standard Silver designs, many of which were minted in a variety of compositions, including silver, copper and aluminum. There are also a number of Standard Silver patterns that are known with both plain and reeded edges.

An extremely rare Standard Silver pattern was recently certified by NGC. Attributed as Judd-814, this pattern is an 1870 Standard Silver Half Dime struck in aluminum with a plain edge. The 10th Edition of the Judd reference, United States Pattern Coins, assigns it “Rarity-8,” for two to three known. The last example to sell publicly was in a December 1984 Heritage Auctions sale.

1870 Judd-814 Pattern Half Dime

NGC has graded this remarkable coin PF 64 Cameo. It is the first and only Judd-814 pattern to be certified by a third-party grading company.



From the Grading Room is an occasional feature of the NGC E-mail Newsletter in which we highlight some of the more unusual or seldom seen items submitted for certification. Click to explore other special finds.



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